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For Those In Peril [DVD]

19 customer reviews

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£5.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Actors: David Farrar, Ralph Michael, Robert Wyndham, John Slater, Robert Griffith
  • Directors: Charles Crichton
  • Writers: Harry Watt, J.O.C. Orton, Richard Hillary, T.E.B. Clarke
  • Producers: Michael Balcon, S.C. Balcon
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Optimum Classic
  • DVD Release Date: 27 April 2009
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001TJKVMS
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 18,527 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Turned down by the RAF for air service on medical grounds, Pilot Officer Rawlings (Ralph Michael) instead joins Air Sea Rescue, helping to pull downed Allied airmen out of the sea. Rawlings is initially resentful of his new job, but gradually comes to appreciate its importance. When the crew of a Boston bomber become stranded at sea in a dinghy, Rawlings and his colleagues become involved in a race against time - and the elements - to save their lives.

From Amazon.co.uk

Charles Crichton is fondly remembered for his Ealing comedies, The Lavender Hill Mob and The Titfield Thunderbolt as well as for his later swansong, A Fish Called Wanda, but long before those he directed this little-known Ealing drama in 1944. For Those in Peril belongs to that peculiar genre of wartime features that are part-fiction, part-documentary, part-propaganda (Coastal Command in 1942 was another in similar vein). In this case, the flimsy story is designed to raise awareness of a little-known branch of the RAF, the Sea Rescue Boats. Pilot Officer Rawlings (Ralph Michael) reluctantly joins the crew of a rescue boat and is introduced to nautical life by skipper Murray (David Farrar). After experiencing the mundane day-to-day routine, Rawlings learns how important their task is when they are called in to rescue the crew of a bomber shot-down in mid-channel. Not only is there thick fog and a minefield to deal with, but a German gunboat is looking for the airmen, too. And just when they seem to have accomplished the rescue, they are shelled by long-range guns from the French coast and strafed by the Luftwaffe. All in a day's work.

Crichton injects some melodrama into proceedings--one of the principal characters dies at the end--but his close ups of nervous faces and effects shots of exploding ships and planes exist simply to enhance the documentary aspect of the story. Actors and dialogue take second place to the depiction of what was, at the time of filming, an important part of the war effort. "Of course, the RMLs have got that pom-pom on the foc'sle," comments Murray matter-of-factly amid a barrage of similar naval jargon. Looking back on it now, For Those in Peril should not be considered a movie as such, more a fascinating historical account of the dark days of war in the English Channel. --Mark Walker --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By B. C. Swinbank on 19 Nov. 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
For Those In Peril is a film I suspect many people will have never seen or even heard of. Yet it is directed by Charles Crichton ( Lavender Hill Mob and later A Fish Called Wanda ), was written by Richard Hillary ( who wrote the classic The Last Enemy, and would be dead by the time the film was released ), has, as a screen writer, Harry Watt ( Target For Tonight) and as a side line stars, in an early unaccredited role, James Robertson Justice.
The story is in a semi- documentary style about the R.A.F. Air Sea Rescue service. The boats are the real stars, there is plenty of great footage of the high speed launches (whalebacks) at sea 'thundering' along at speed, (similar in style to the later John Ford film `They Were Expendable '). The RAF boats are gamely supported by RN Mls, with plenty of hardware footage. Best other bits, after the boats, is a Supermarine Walrus taking off, next to the camera, circling back and flying away, in one take, taking about 42 seconds ( not that I've time it!!). There is another brief shot of the ASR boats being attacked by German aircraft ( really RAF Spitfires/Mustangs) very, very low on a choppy sea.
The downside is the acting which is a bit 'ropey' in places. For example there is a 'Noel Coward' Spitfire pilot who is ` orbiting for a fix`, but the worst is at the end when one of the characters dies, he is just left on the floor, forgotten and I assume people having to walk around him.
I videoed this film, about 20 years ago when it was shown on Channel 4 in its Britain At War series and the print they used was damaged. This copy is ( for its age ) almost perfect and I'd like to commend Optimum HE for this on a `limited appeal' film.
Finally it is worth remembering that I think only about 25% of allied crews that ditched in the sea were rescued alive.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Yannis on 20 Nov. 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I'm a fan of Ealing studios black and white war drama. This is one of my special. Much different to all the rest black and white war drama films, touching a most forgotten but important aspect of the WWII war which was sea reascue of pilots in the channel. It is a must to see, short in length however quite a gripping especially when you realise you're in the middle of a mine field! Hope you enjoy it as I did.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Swingtime Steve on 25 Mar. 2010
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An unusual film, shot during World War 2 about the little heralded RAF Air Sea Rescue Service. A basic plot, with good 'stiff upper-lip'acting from the cast, but the real stars are the boats themselves and the type of work they and their crews were called upon to do during those dark days. Coupled with the movie 'The Sea Shall Not have Them', both are a tribute and acknowledgement to the men who served in this service.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By C. C. on 4 July 2010
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A film made closely with Admiralty - Ealing Studios typically understated, of its time. No glory or glamourising. A gritty story too.

Yes characters have their flaws - they must have had in WWll, but that generation all knew "stuff happens" and weeping and moaning didn't help anything, best to keep on cracking. They do in this film.

Love the rival banter between the RN and RAF Rescue teams, none of the present day sneering, as that used to mark one out as 'a bad'n'. These days, its an accolade.

The modesty in this film, and of the time, lends the film its poignancy; that heartfelt understatement of reverence rather than selfish, unrestrained and hysterical emotionalism of these present times.

Anyone who has had the privilege of either people in their family or meeting such men, will definitely recognise the characters and no doubt
will experience prickles in their eyes and lump in the throat.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Silver Surfer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 April 2012
Format: DVD
There are only two movies that show the work of the RAF's least-known section, that of the Air Rescue Service. This is one and 'The Sea Shall Not Have Them' is the other. Both are little-known now and neither is easily available.

The service, as it was then used fast light power-boats rather similar to the more famous motor torpedo boats, but with rather less fire power. They did not have RADAR and used radio and maps to find the downed flyers.

A fighter or bomber flying over the North Sea or the English Channel may well come under attack from the Germans. A plane that may have been on a raid could easily be severely damaged and some of its crew killed or wounded. For the pilot of a fighter, he would for the main part be alone in his aircraft and if shot down he would have a Mae West lifejacket but probably not an inflatable dinghy as there would rarely be room for one. A bomber may have one or two dinghies to accommodate its crew of seven or more.

Without a dinghy, the sea was unbelievably cold and survival often one of minutes rather than hours. In a dinghy, it could be hours or a day os so, but not usually days. The cost of training a pilot was high and losses of pilots and planes almost unsustainable. If a plane could not be recovered, hopefully, its pilot could be.

It wasn't only Allied airmen who would be rescued; a significant number of enemy crews were also saved from the sea. Nowadays, helicopters are used, but it was not a commonly seen craft and not then used by the Allies. A few years later, in the Korean war, they were commonplace.

Although neither of these movies is expressly about the men of the Rescue service but more so the downed airmen, both give an impression just how welcome a sight they then must have been. They were often the difference between survival and a frozen death.

A very good film but rarely seen on TV, ever! It is one of the many retrospective 'war hero' movies of the mid-50s.
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