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Fool's Gold: How Unrestrained Greed Corrupted a Dream, Shattered Global Markets and Unleashed a Catastrophe Hardcover – 30 Apr 2009


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown (30 April 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408701642
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408701645
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 3.1 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 166,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Gillian Tett has worked for the Financial Times for fifteen years, where she runs the global markets. In 2008 she won the British Press Award for the Business Journalist of the Year. She often appears on high-profile discussion programmes such as Today and she lectures widely. She has a PhD in social anthropology from Cambridge
University.

Product Description

Review

`A truly gripping narrative . . . The fact that Tett is able to reproduce such raw private communications is a tribute to her journalistic abilities'
-- Dominic Lawson, Sunday Times

`Her blow-by-blow story is an impressive piece of detective work. She pulls back the curtain on a closed, unaccountable world of finance' -- Will Hutton, Guardian

'A truly gripping narrative . . . The fact that Tett is able to reproduce such raw private communications is a tribute to her journalistic abilities' Dominic Lawson, SUNDAY TIMES -- Dominic Lawson, SUNDAY TIMES

'A very readable, well-informed account of the way investment bankers invented, promoted and profited from the . . . financial products that were at the heart of the financial collapse' Vince Cable, Daily Telegraph -- Vince Cable, Daily Telegraph

'Her blow-by-blow story is an impressive piece of detective work. She pulls back the curtain on a closed, unaccountable world of finance' Will Hutton, GUARDIAN -- Will Hutton, GUARDIAN

`A fascinating and detailed look at the crisis, seen through the prism of the venerable investment bank JP Morgan'
-- Observer

`An absorbing 15-year gallop across the Wild West of the world's financial markets . . . Tett sketches a system in the grip of a great error, emanating outwards from a cadre of elite traders who were able to repel any attempt to monitor, question or restrain them'
-- Stephen Foley, Independent

Review

`Her blow-by-blow story is an impressive piece of detective work. She pulls back the curtain on a closed, unaccountable world of finance'

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Chuck E VINE VOICE on 3 May 2010
Format: Paperback
The subtitle could have been: 'How the Unrestrained Greed of Everyone Else Corrupted J.P.Morgan's Dream, Shattered Global Markets and Unleashed a Catastrophe: How a Saintly Band of Bankers Rewrote the Rules of Finance and Unleashed an Innovation Storm that they can't be Blamed for.

If you were to take a walk past J.P.Morgan's mid-town offices, I wouldn't be surprised if you were to see employees from the PR Dept. handing out copies of this book to passers-by. Although it gives a fairly decent, if superficial, run through of events, it is hampered by its partial perspective - seen exclusively through the prism of a team of J.P.Morgan bankers who claim most of the credit for the financial innovations that ultimately wrecked the world economy, but little of the blame - which is, at least partly, dumped at the door of those dastardly regulators for not breaking up the party when it was in full swing and Chuck Prince was still dancing.

This small band of fun-loving, ambitious, and moreover, idealistic financial geniuses discovered that, if they could dice up various debt products and sell them on, and then 'insure' the risk of default by selling cover even to those not holding that risk - 'exposures could be transferred to the most efficient holders of that risk'. Alternatively, it could be transferred more efficiently to those unaware of what those risks really were - particularly if it could be rubber-stamped as AAA by agencies paid by the sellers of those products. At no point is there the suggestion of any awareness that dislocating the originators of loans from the risk of default might not be an unalloyed boon.

All that was needed was to convince the regulators that these new product markets could be self-policing.
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95 of 101 people found the following review helpful By Tim Scott on 8 May 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is the first properly considered book about the financial crisis to be published. Gillian Tett is well known as a financial journalist (working for the FT in London). Accordingly, you might think this book has been rushed out to simply rehearse the emerging consensus view on the causes of the financial crisis. Not so! This is a very impressive volume. To start with - Gillian Tett knows the spider's web of complex structured products at the heart of this story well enough to be able to describe it simply. That is the mark of true mastery. What is best about this book, however, is the way it tells the human story. That is the story of the innovators at J.P. Morgan who created these products and realised at an early stage that they left behind a kind of nuclear waste that needed to be properly contained - particularly so in relation to derivatives based on residential mortgages (the default pattern of which was essentially unknowable until recently). Other banks didn't realise this (or didn't care) and just left that waste sitting on their balance sheets, or worse, shifted it to quasi-subsidiary vehicles where it was hidden and supported by short-term funding that quickly evaporated at the first sign of trouble. Ultimately, the book shows that financial innovation is not a problem per se - it's the use to which such innovation was put that created problems.

Overall - this is a very informative and interesting read which has clearly been in the planning for some time. A well considered book.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Olly Buxton on 1 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've now read no fewer than seven excellent books detailing the financial atrocities of 2007-9. Each takes a different spin.

British broker Philip Augar covers the historical perspective; hedge fund manager and amateur philosopher George Soros looks to epistemology; former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan provides a wide-ranging survey aimed more or less at self-exculpation; former Goldman Sachs chief and US Treasury secretary Hank Paulson breathlessly covers the regulator's perspective; New York Times journalist Andrew Ross Sorkin impressively covers the CEO's perspective and Michael Lewis writes from the perspective of those motley few who not only saw the crash coming (as we all did!) with hindsight, but bet on it happening ahead of time.

Now Gillian Tett, an excellent writer for the Financial Times, provides the credit structurer's perspective. Surveying the economic and intellectual environment which lent the tools and opportunity for these sub-prime backed products to get off the ground, Tett tells the story through the prism of the J. P.
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