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Fool Kindle Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews

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Length: 337 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Description

Review

There's more murder, mayhem, mistaken identities and scene changes than you can remember, but bestselling Moore turns things on their head with an edgy 21st-century perspective that makes the story line as sharp, surly and slick as a game of Grand Theft Auto (Publishers Weekly)

Wall-to-wall, farcical fornicating and fighting...a jolly good time can be had (Booklist)

Wretched excess doth have power to charm, and there are great reeking oodles of it strewn throughout these irreverent pages (Kirkus Reviews)

Funny, literate, smart and sexy, all at once! (Jeff Lindsay (Dexter))

Book Description

A bawdy Shakespearean romp from the brilliant author of Lamb

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1081 KB
  • Print Length: 337 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (5 Jan. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0032TYQN8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #276,343 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Christopher Moore was born in Ohio and lived there until he was nineteen, when he moved to California. Before publishing his first novel, Practical Demonkeeping, in 1992, he worked as a roofer, a grocery clerk, a hotel night auditor, and insurance broker, a waiter, a photographer, and a rock and roll DJ. Chris divides his time between Hawaii and San Francisco.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Maybe I am outgrowing Moore. I loved Lamb and A Dirty Job, and enjoyed his other books enough. The concept here and the moral ambiguity of Pocket are the strongest points, but this one really dashed my hopes. Moore can't stop making American jokes when he is trying to be British, and unlike Lamb, where this sort of worked, here it was a crashing mess. As an ardent Shakespeare fan who recognized and could quote the plays he cross references, the goofy tone and inability to let the darkness of the material show through, bugged me. Lear is just too unsympathetic and the material is too silly, with frivolous bells rather than the black comedy it needed. The thing that annoyed me most was that it ended like every other Christopher Moore book. I could wax at length about what else was wrong with it. A lot of people will disagree, but if you are hoping for a dark and serious comedy, skip this one.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had high hopes for this book after the first chapter or so. Very witty and funny, but then the vulgarity of the book came through and I just lost interest. It just feels so unnecessary and really puts off the flow of the book as you don't really want to sit there and visualize some of things written. It may very well get better further in but the simple fact I was so put off so much so early really put an end to my experience with this book.
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Format: Paperback
In writing Fool, Christopher Moore has set himself quite a challenge - he has attempted a radical (and rascally) reimaging of King Lear, one of Shakespeare's most revered tragedies. As unlikely as it may sound, however, Moore has pulled off his foray into surrealist Shakespearean satire with great aplomb. Fittingly, given Moore's desire to turn tragedy into comedy, the narrator of Fool is King Lear's court jester. The eponymous Fool is Pocket, a short of stature and shorter still of morals foundling, who was raised in a nunnery until various nefarious teenage shenanigans led to his being turn out to earn a living through his wits. Being a multi-talented fellow - he can caper, insult, throw knives, forge letters and even make the melancholy Princess Cordelia chortle - Pocket found employment at the court of the unwitting and indeed witless King of the Britons, Lear. Unfortunately for Pocket, while the fool can do no wrong in the eyes of the King, just about every other original Shakespearean character wants to kill him.

As Fool opens, the plot stays fairly true to that of King Lear. Lear is growing old and so wants to divide his kingdom between his three daughters but, being a vain and conceited old man, he decides to base the apportionment on how much his daughters tell him that they love him. While his two eldest daughters, Goneril and Regan, flatter him with false words of love, Lear's youngest daughter tells him the truth and so he foolishly disinherits her. As Cordelia is banished and married off to a French Prince, Lear divides his kingdom equally between Goneril and Regan on the proviso that he will spend half the year living with one of them and half the year with the other.
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By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I must admit that before reading this I quickly re-read King Lear as I haven't read it for a couple of years. To be honest Christopher Moore has kept the main story as it is in the play, more or less. King Lear, based on a Celtic legend is one of the if not the greatest tragedy penned by the immortal bard and it is something that may make you cringe thinking that someone has tried to write a new comic version.

I started this with some trepidation, not really knowing what to expect, but I must admit that this was an easy read that did have me laughing out loud in places. Although you don't necessarily have to know the play or have seen a version of it, it obviously does help, also if you do have a knowledge of Shakespeare's other plays (which fortunately I do). This isn't just a parody of King Lear though, as there are lines from and references to other plays by Shakespeare that you can easily work out as you read along. With lots of swearing and other displays of bawdiness this is well written and will bring a smile to your face. If you are a purist you may not wish to read this, but even so I think that it could well attract people to actually sitting down and reading the plays by the greatest writer of all time. A good effort at trying to tackle something that is part of our heritage. If you wonder why Moore has set this in the period when he has, and with unerring lack of understanding of our history then you will find the answers in his afterword, which is well worth reading.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Christopher Moore was not an author I'd read previously but looking for something new I decided to give Fool a try. I must confess to being a little sceptical about his being compared to Terry Pratchett, who I have been reading for over twenty years. However it only took me a couple of chapters to realise that I was going to really enjoy this book.

The story is loosely based on Shakespear's King Lear, with a few alterations, and is narrated from the perspective of Pocket. Pocket is the King's fool who is rude and cheeky to everybody without exception - imagine Rik Mayall in jester's clothes improvising satire about the events going on around him whilst simultaneously pursuing anything in a skirt and you're about there.

We follow Pocket as his master disowns his best friend and his youngest daughter Cordelia, gives her and his kingdom away, loses his knights to his scheming other two daughters and is finally reconciled as Cordelia returns from France to take the Kingdom. Along the way Pocket, who is introduced as an orphan, gets into cahoots with three witches, discovers his parentage and plots mercilessly with all and sundry to achieve his own ends.

This is definitely a bawdy tale, the language might take you back a bit at first - get past that and it is also a hugely entertaining read from beginning to end. I thoroughly enjoyed it and have subsequently sought out other Christopher Moore books to read.
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