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Flying Colours: The Epic Story of Douglas Bader (Wordsworth Military Library) Paperback – 19 Oct 2000


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Product details

  • Paperback: 303 pages
  • Publisher: Wordsworth Editions Ltd; New edition edition (19 Oct. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840222484
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840222487
  • Product Dimensions: 21.5 x 13.6 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,428,647 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By W. Weinstein on 12 July 2001
Format: Paperback
In two hundred and ninety interminable pages, Ladddie Lucas tells the extraordinary story of his friend Douglas Bader's life. Like a film with only one memorable character, the book is fine as long as Bader is on the page. Mr Lucas unfortunately devotes endless space to describe the machinations of various characters in the Air Ministry as well as the comings and goings of the faceless executives of Shell Oil, a company that Mr Lucas appears to want to work for, so fulsome is his praise. Paul Brickhill's original biography, Reach For the Sky does a much better job of telling the bare bones of Douglas Bader's amazing life. It is obvious that Mr Lucas has taken great pains not to simply reiterate the well-known facts, but by not doing so he seems to plays down much of what Douglas Bader was about. The gripping nature of the subject saves this book from faltering completely but the flat, dull chapters about long-forgotten disputes in the corridors of power, and the somewhat turgid prose style left this reader underwhelmed.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The author was Bader's step-brother in law. He married Bader's wife's half sister. He looks at Bader's early life, his early flying and the story behind his crash and rise again from the terrible injuries. Of course these days there are many, 30+ double and triple amputees who all get about after months of therapy and rehabilitation but one has to remember that this was 1931 and most people, as can be seen from pictures of WW1 veterans, were consigned to wheel/bath chairs after losing their legs. Bader, with his grit, determination and sheer bloodymindedness (which kept him going) conquered what was then unsurmountable odds and was never entirely without pain for the rest of his life.

I met him several times by working for the same organisation. He could be brusque and frightening to a young girl but the air was electric in his presence and he was, above all, a very very kind person. A honour to know.

This book does him justice.
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By Sus on 14 Dec. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this - I had read Reach for the Sky years ago and this gave so much more detail about his life. It is fascinating.

I heard about it when listening to his Desert island discs from around the time this was published and he mentioned it. Laddie Lucas was his brother-in-law, married to Douglas Bader's first wife's sister.
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Very interesting, a different take on the film and held me from start to finish. So glad I purchased this I was in two minds as to whether to or not
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Douglas Bader is a true HERO - This book is not to be missed 31 Mar. 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Douglas Bader lost both of his legs in a terrible plane crash just before the start of WWII. Bader had to learn to walk again, with two aluminum legs. Bader was strong willed and refused to let his disability change him.

Douglas Bader was determined to do his part in the War and convinced the RAF that he could fly again. Due to the absolute need for pilots, the RAF granted Bader permission to fly again after demonstrating his ability to indeed fly.

Bader shortly became a top Ace for the RAF.

You have to read this book if you love action and adventure.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Poorly handled bio of a great man 19 Feb. 2007
By John H. Green - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This books does not stack up well against the superlative Reach for the Sky. Lucas' link to Bader is via marriage to Bader's first wife's (Thelma)sister. Some good personal memories and insights, however, if you want the full, detailed story of Bader's remarkable life, stick to the Brickhill classic.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Reach For The Sky 26 Jun. 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Reach For The Sky is a biography of Douglas Bader. It is one of the most exciting and inspriing bools I have ever read. I obtained this book in a surplus library discard. It was so exciting that I got no sleep untill the book was finished
Fab! 8 April 2003
By Iona - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Flying Colours is an absolutly fab book- particually as it is written by one of Bader's closest of kin- his brother in law, Wing Commander P.B Laddie Lucas (who was married to Bader's wife's (Thelma) sister, Jill). Laddie had only known Bader from 1946, but they became the best of friends, and were very close from then on. This is a lovley, well written book, and well worth a read- and is also very informative on the perspectives of Fighter Command in WWII, and provides more in-depth info on Bader, which hasn't been revealed before!
Go out and read it!
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Too much detail, not enough dash 25 Sept. 2001
By W. Weinstein - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In two hundred and ninety interminable pages, Ladddie Lucas tells the extraordinary story of his friend Douglas Bader's life. Like a film with only one memorable character, the book is fine as long as Bader is on the page. Mr Lucas unfortunately devotes endless space to describe the machinations of various characters in the Air Ministry as well as the comings and goings of the faceless executives of Shell Oil, a company that Mr Lucas appears to work for, so fulsome is his praise. Paul Brickhill's original biography, Reach For the Sky does a much better job of telling the bare bones of Douglas Bader's amazing life. It is obvious that Mr Lucas has taken great pains not to simply reiterate the well-known facts, but by not doing so he seems to play down much of what Douglas Bader was about. The gripping nature of the subject saves this book from faltering completely but the flat, dull chapters about long-forgotten disputes in the corridors of power, and the somewhat turgid prose style left this reader underwhelmed.
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