Fleshmarket Close (Inspector Rebus Book 15) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £6.99 (78%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Fleshmarket Close has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for super saver delivery.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fleshmarket Close Paperback – 7 Aug 2008


See all 43 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
£2.00
£0.99 £0.01
£2.00 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Fleshmarket Close + A Question of Blood (Inspector Rebus) + Exit Music
Price For All Three: £17.18

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Orion (7 Aug. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0752883674
  • ISBN-13: 978-0752883670
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 3.2 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (111 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,241 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in the Kingdom of Fife in 1960, Ian Rankin graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 1982, and then spent three years writing novels when he was supposed to be working towards a PhD in Scottish Literature. His first Rebus novel was published in 1987, and the Rebus books are now translated into thirty-six languages and are bestsellers worldwide.

Ian Rankin has been elected a Hawthornden Fellow, and is also a past winner of the Chandler-Fulbright Award. He is the recipient of four Crime Writers' Association Dagger Awards including the prestigious Diamond Dagger in 2005. In 2004, Ian won America's celebrated Edgar Award for Resurrection Men. He has also been shortlisted for the Anthony Award in the USA, won Denmark's Palle Rosenkrantz Prize, the French Grand Prix du Roman Noir and the Deutscher Krimipreis. Ian Rankin is also the recipient of honorary degrees from the universities of Abertay, St Andrews, Edinburgh, Hull and the Open University.

A contributor to BBC2's Newsnight Review, he also presented his own TV series, Ian Rankin's Evil Thoughts. Rankin is a number one bestseller in the UK and has received the OBE for services to literature, opting to receive the prize in his home city of Edinburgh, where he lives with his partner and two sons.

Here are the Inspector Rebus stories in series order:

Knots and Crosses
Hide and Seek
Tooth and Nail
Strip Jack
The Black Book
Mortal Causes
Let it Bleed
Black and Blue
The Hanging Garden
Dead Souls
Set in Darkness
The Falls
Resurrection Men
A Question of Blood
Fleshmarket Close
The Naming of the Dead
Exit Music

Short stories:
A Good Hanging - 12 Inspector Rebus mysteries
Beggars Banquet (non-Rebus short stories)

Here are the Jack Harvey novels in series order:

Witch Hunt
Bleeding Hearts
Blood Hunt

Product Description

Amazon Review

Fleshmarket Close is not one of the best of Rankin's John Rebus thrillers, but his second-best is still more than excellent. Middle age is catching up with Rebus--he currently has no desk as a none-too-subtle hint from his superiors that he should seek retirement--but he and his friend and protegee Siobhan, who is still not his lover, race around investigating a variety of seemingly unconnected cases… The sister of a dead rape victim is missing; stolen medical skeletons turn up embedded in a concrete floor; a Kurdish journalist is brutally killed; the son of a Glasgow ganglord has moved in to the Edinburgh vice scene.

Much of the book is dominated by two new settings--a sink estate divided between racist thugs and refugees, and a small town whose economy is dominated by an internment camp for those about to be deported; this is one of Rankin's preachier thrillers, but it is never less than intelligent and evocative in its descriptions of a contemporary squalor that spreads beyond the inner city. These are never quite orthodox police procedurals--Rebus' method is a little too like the standard private eye's way of wandering around being rude to people until something comes loose--but they have a deep seriousness about the way we live now that transcends mere noir moodiness.--Roz Kaveney --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Fleshmarket Close was featured in the new BBC bookclub programme hosted by Jeremy Vine - BBC PAGE TURNERS. The interview with Ian was broadcast on Monday 18 April on BBC1 at 9.15am. THE GUARDIAN have interviewed Ian for the Saturday Review. This is a major profile interview by Nick Wroe with photographs by Eamonn McCabe. This will run mid-May to tie in to Ian's talk at the Guardian Hay Festival. BBC RADIO WALES 'Phil the Shelf' are interviewing Ian at Hay. On 9 April FINANCIAL TIMES ran an profile interview with Ian for the Weekend Interview. This was done whilst Ian was touring the States. Fleshmarket Close was also winner of the 2005 British Book Award for Crime Thriller of the Year. The award was announced at the Nibbies on 20 April and broadcast on Channel 4 'RICHARD AND JUDY on 22 April. THE TIMES ran a diary story following the announcement of the shortlist and the Nibbies got widespread media coverage. Ian was awarded CWA DIAMOND DAGGER for Lifetime Achievement on Wednesday 11 May at the Savoy. Ian has written 100 words for GUARDIAN summer reading feature. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
'I'm not supposed to be here,' Detective Inspector John Rebus said. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By RachelWalker TOP 500 REVIEWER on 17 Oct. 2004
Format: Unknown Binding
...Fleshmarket Close/Edinburgh Fringe...
The question, at this stage in Rankin's career, is not "can he write a bad book?" but, "can he even write a lacklustre one?" The answer, unequivocally, is no. At first, I was a little nervous about this new novel, which sees Rebus investigating the stabbing of a Kurdish immigrant in a grotty underpass on an Edinburgh housing scheme called Knoxland. Partly because the "asylum-seeker issue" is so incredibly well-worn in this country, taking up more pages of newspaper-columnage than any other, probably. I was a little worried that it'd feel a little recycled, a little tired, but I was wrong to be worried. I had misplaced my faith in Rankin! Honestly, when you routinely get one novel per year (well, roughly) that is always of such quality, it's very easy to forget how good some authors are.
The issues here do not feel tired at all. Instead, what Rankin does is use his novel as a kind of melting-pot for the discussion so far, as well as adding a few snappy ingredients of his own. It serves as a level-headed, cool examination of an issue that so often gets drowned and distorted in its own hysteria.
As Rankin himself has said, it's a book about what it means to be on the edge, to be an outsider. Here, it also succeeds unquestionably. We are practically barraged with images of outsiders, of people living just on the fringe or outside the lines. Rebus himself is an outsider here: St Leonard's CID is being disbanded, its officers sent to other stations. Rebus, along with Siobhan Clarke, is placed in the unfamiliar territory of Gayfield Square, and finds himself tagging along at the edge of an investigation in which he really has no place, though no one seems to care what he's doing anyway.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 17 Feb. 2006
Format: Hardcover
I am a long time fan of Iain Rankin's Rebus novels. I suppose living in Edinburgh and just round the corner from the real Arden Street, where Rebus has his flat, makes it seem all the more authentic. Imagine my puzzlement then to see this edition of his book entitled "Fleshmarket Alley".
The original published title is "Fleshmarket Close". This is a genuine street in Edinburgh's old town. It is indeed a narrow alley just off the High Street, connecting to Cockburn Street and on down a steep incline to Market Street just across from the city's Waverley Station.
I guess they changed the title for overseas publication on the basis that people might not know that a "Close" is an "Alley" in Scottish parlance. Still, it seems a shame to detract from the great sense of locale that Rankin gives his novels by setting them in the living flesh and blood of Edinburgh. Even though the novel's housing estate of Knoxville had its name changed to protect the innocent(!), any resident of 'Auld Reekie' ('Old Smokey' - an ancient and not entirely flattering name for the City of Edinburgh) could tell you exactly where it is and you would find it much as described.
If you want to know your Edinburgh and enjoy a great thriller thrown in then the Rebus series is for you. But, please, why change the title in this unnecessary way.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By prisrob TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 May 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Ian Rankin starts his new book with this quote: "It is to Scotland that we look for our ideas of civilisation" (Voltaire)

John Rebus finds himself ensconced in a murder mystery- a Kurdish immigrant is found murdered in a housing development called Knoxland. Rebus's original police station has closed, and he is trying to find a place for himself. His reputation precedes him; he is known as a troublemaker or trouble finder and not an easy person to deal with. He is also known as someone who is trustworthy and honest (well, to a degree). He must push himself into this investigation, and as always Rebus finds the truth and a little more. Rebus is a kinder, gentler man in this novel. He attempts to develop a relationship with an artist who is fighting to have an immigrant detention center closed. However, Rebus is the enemy so to speak, so this relationship is not an easy one. Rebus is also watching his drink, not really drinking less but watching it; so he has developed a real social conscience- he doesn't drive while drinking.

In the meantime Siobhan Clarke, Detective Sergeant, a close friend of Rebus's has developed her own mystery. She is asked by parents to look for their daughter, Ishbel Jardine. Siobhan had been involved in an attempt to solve the crime of their older daughter's rape and subsequent suicide. Now this younger daughter has gone missing, and the parents are worried. She is drawn into the search and then to find the murderer of this first daughter's rapist.

Both of these mysteries have close ties, and Rebus and Siobhan work together. Is the murder of the immigrant a racist plot? The twists and turns lead to a mass immigrant con game with big money at the core. The disappearance of the young girl leads to consequences not expected.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By RachelWalker TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Oct. 2004
Format: Unknown Binding
...Fleshmarket Close/Edinburgh Fringe...
The question, at this stage in Rankin's career, is not "can he write a bad book?" but, "can he even write a lacklustre one?" The answer, unequivocally, is no. At first, I was a little nervous about this new novel, which sees Rebus investigating the stabbing of a Kurdish immigrant in a grotty underpass on an Edinburgh housing scheme called Knoxland. Partly because the "asylum-seeker issue" is so incredibly well-worn in this country, taking up more pages of newspaper-columnage than any other, probably. I was a little worried that it'd feel a little recycled, a little tired, but I was wrong to be worried. I had misplaced my faith in Rankin! Honestly, when you routinely get one novel per year (well, roughly) that is always of such quality, it's very easy to forget how good some authors are.
The issues here do not feel tired at all. Instead, what Rankin does is use his novel as a kind of melting-pot for the discussion so far, as well as adding a few snappy ingredients of his own. It serves as a level-headed, cool examination of an issue that so often gets drowned and distorted in its own hysteria.
As Rankin himself has said, it's a book about what it means to be on the edge, to be an outsider. Here, it also succeeds unquestionably. We are practically barraged with images of outsiders, of people living just on the fringe or outside the lines. Rebus himself is an outsider here: St Leonard's CID is being disbanded, its officers sent to other stations. Rebus, along with Siobhan Clarke, is placed in the unfamiliar territory of Gayfield Square, and finds himself tagging along at the edge of an investigation in which he really has no place, though no one seems to care what he's doing anyway.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback