Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Flatland;: A romance of many dimensions, Unknown Binding – 1885


See all 49 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"


Product details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Roberts Brothers (1885)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00085VNVC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Andrew on 18 April 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a compact, insightful and thought-provoking gem which can be appreciated from scientific, mathematical, historical and cultural standpoints. With string theory popularising the concept of higher dimensions today, it's an ideal starting point for those wanting to be able to consider some of the big questions that science is asking. Furthermore, this edition is everything you could want from an ebook. It's formatted perfectly, doesn't forgo the illustrations which are important in a book like this, and is at a fantastic price.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dychanwr on 14 Feb 2008
Format: Paperback
Please don't be deterred by those reviewers who imagine that the author shared the Flatlanders' disparaging view of women and blue-collar men. Not so. E. A. Abbott was an energetic teacher and writer as well as an Anglican priest, and he devoted a great deal of his energy to the cause of women's education, working with the leading female educators of the day in their campaign for access to universities and better opportunities for secondary education. As well as a parable and an introduction to n-dimensional geometry, Flatland is a satire on social prejudice-- on two-dimensional attitudes, in other words. The clues can be found in the book itself, but the record of Abbott's life confirms the satirical agenda. Victorian clergymen weren't all misogynists and snobs, and to assume that Victorians in general were stuffy, biased, and repressed is both patronizing and unfair. There are bigots in every time and place, our own included, but there are always also those who are working for a better, juster world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Welford on 5 Feb 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Not a review of the book as a piece of literature, but the Kindle edition of this version of the novel is abysmal. Avoid.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Brown on 27 Mar 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Delightful and thought-provoking little book. Clear and easy to read on the Kindle and it is great to have the illustrations within the text.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Zeudy Tigre on 25 Nov 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Flatland, by Edwin A. Abbott, is one of the oddest books that I have ever read. Published in 1884 it tells the tale of a square, a resident of a two dimensional world, and his discovery of an incredible third dimension when he is visited by a sphere from Spaceland. Many of his fellow plane dwellers think him deranged, just as the resident of Lineland whom he met in a dream would not accept the existence of a second dimension because it was beyond his direct experience and comprehension.

Using mathematics the practicalities of these various worlds is explained. Each is imbued with strict hierarchies and rules alongside enhanced senses that allow order to be maintained. Much of it came across as disturbing, such as women in Flatland being the lowest of the low (almost a straight line) whereas rulers and priests were of the highest order (circles).

Children born with irregularities were generally killed at birth with any survivors forbidden to reproduce. Amongst the higher orders it was common to subject offspring to life threatening procedures in an attempt to increase the number of sides they had and thereby improve their social standing.

I struggled with the lengthy explanations in the first half of the book. They may have been clever in places and necessary for understanding but I found their presentation somewhat tedious. By the second half however the tale had become strangely readable. I had to get past my distaste for the eugenics in order to appreciate the allegorical timbre. I suspect that this story was created with a strong dose of irony, at least I hope it was.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By hbw VINE VOICE on 14 Sep 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What an extraordinary book! I approached it expecting a period piece and found a masterpiece. Don't get me wrong - it's no surprise that the author was a Victorian clergyman-schoolmaster - who else would think of writing an entertaining best-seller about geometry and the fourth dimension?

Told from the perspective a respectable middle class citizen of the two-dimensional world of Flatland, this is a 120-page tour-de force. Whilst taking the reader through the imaginative steps which lead, logically, to the idea of four (or more) dimensions, the narrative reflects many of the social absurdities and dangerous ideas of Victorian Britain. On the lighter side, the narrator pokes gentle fun at the class system and social ambition; on the darker side he discusses eugenics, egalitarianism and the threat of unorthodox ideas.

Science fiction? Geometry? Philosophy? Satire? It's been compared to Gulliver, Erehwon, The Time Machine and Alice in Wonderland. Alice is probably the closest - but only in the sense that it's one of those rare books that demands a category of its own.

As well as the text, the Oxford World's Classics edition has a useful introduction, a good bibliography and a chronology of the life of Edwin Abbott. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Katharine Morrison on 9 Jun 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I bought flatland expecting it to be mostly about the perception of things in different dimensions and it certainly covers that, but it also points out the flaws in the victorian class system, the equality of genders, the stigma attatched to derformity and the main protagonist is more relatable to than most because of the indepth description of how he sees things. This book now ranks in my top 10 and possibly in my top 5. I'm in two minds if the author is extremly smart and imaginitive or ever so slightly mad, all I can be sure if is that he wrote a really good book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback