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Flashman at the Charge (The Flashman Papers, Book 7) Paperback – 6 Feb 2006


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Flashman at the Charge (The Flashman Papers, Book 7) + Flashman in the Great Game (The Flashman Papers, Book 8) + Flashman and the Redskins (The Flashman Papers, Book 6)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; New Ed edition (6 Feb 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007217188
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007217182
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.1 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 31,919 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

The author of the famous 'Flashman Papers' and the 'Private McAuslan' stories, George MacDonald Fraser has worked on newspapers in Britain and Canada. In addition to his novels he has also written numerous films, most notably 'The Three Musketeers', 'The Four Musketeers', and the James Bond film, 'Octopussy'. George Macdonald Fraser died in January 2008 at the age of 82.

Product Description

Review

'The Flashman Papers do what all great sagas do – winning new admirers along the way but never, ever betraying old ones. It is an immense achievement.' Sunday Telegraph

‘Not so much a march as a full-blooded charge, fortified by the usual lashings of salty sex, meticulously choreographed battle scenes and hilariously spineless acts of self preservation by Flashman.’ Sunday Times

‘Not only are the Flashman books extremely funny, but they give meticulous care to authenticity. You can, between the guffaws, learn from them.’ Washington Post

‘A first-rate historical novelist’ Kingsley Amis

From the Back Cover

THE FLASHMAN PAPERS 1854-1855

'Forward the Light Brigade' Was there a man dismayed?

Indeed there was. As the British cavalry prepare to launch themselves against the Russian guns at Balaclava, Harry Flashman was not so much dismayed as terrified. But the Crimea was only the beginning: beyond lay the snowbound wastes of the great Russian slave-empire, torture and death from relentless enemies, headlong escapes, savage tribal hordes to the right of him, passionate and beautiful females to the left of him, and finally that order almost unknown but desperate war on the roof of the world, when India was the prize, and there was nothing to stop and armed might of Imperial Russia but the wavering sabre and terrified ingenuity of old Flashy himself.

"Vintage Flashman…recommended"
FINANCIAL TIMES

"Superbly funny"
BIRMINGHAM EVENING MAIL

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Didier TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 22 Feb 2007
Format: Paperback
The standard of the entire Flashman-series is incredibly high, but this must surely be one of the best installments. As usual Flashman is - however unwillingly - in the thick of legendary military actions, and doesn't shrink from helping us to his opinion of well-known historical figures such as Raglan ('the old fool'), Cardigan ('lecherous villain') and a score of others.

This is superb entertainment for anyone even remotely interested in history, and if you fail to appreciate the politically (very) incorrect humour well damn your eyes! ;-)
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Larry Ferens on 5 Sep 2005
Format: Paperback
I must confess, I am a newcomer to the world of Flashman, speaking relatively. I was hooked by Flashman in the Great Game and have worked my way backwards to make my third adventure this one.
Despite carefully lying low at the Board of Ordanance as war with Russia rears its head, Flashy finds the German Prince William of Celle under his charge, and their destination is to the frontlines of Crimea. Young Willy unfortunately loses his life at the Battle of the Alma, but with the allied effort pushing forward, Flashman is stuck amongst the action. Although being attacked by a savage Russian pox of severe wind, he is merely a message galloper and enjoys relative safety. Or so he believes. Events see him inadvertently standing fast with the Highlanders at the Thin Red Line, joining the Heavy Brigade in counter-attack and roped into the famous Charge of the Light Brigade, throwing themselves against the Russian guns, and that's where his immense (unintentional) bravery leads him into Russian hands...
A stunning Flashman book, full of the usual wit, writing skill and superb understanding of historical fact found in G. M. Fraser's most excellent series.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Arty on 19 Feb 2003
Format: Paperback
I confess to having read all of the Flashman books. They are all brilliant, some slightly more so than others. This (in my opinion) is one of his best tales. The feeling that you are with Flashy all the way is sometimes palpable, especially during the build up to the Charge of the Light Brigade. I felt as if I was there, hearing the creak of saddles and the jingle of harnesses, in the moments before the charge. The writing is at times very fine indeed: undoubtedly people will be reading these books in a 100 years time. They are classics and they are hilariously funny.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Free Radical on 13 April 2009
Format: Paperback
This is one of the definitive Flashman books, a cracking read with all the ingredients that made the series so successful: wild adventure, uproarious humour, thrills, spills and skulduggery galore. The historical vignettes, military action and character sketches are all (as ever) meticulously researched with fact and fiction skillfully woven together and, when recounted in Flashman's inimitable voice, they absolutely leap off the page.

I won't bore you with a plot summary; suffice to say that the Crimean War (especially the Charge of the Light Brigade) was never funnier. Newcomers should ideally start at the beginning of the series but if you want a quick introduction to what all the fuss is about, this is as good a place to find out as any.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By James Connolly on 11 April 2006
Format: Paperback
If there's a bad flashman I ain't read it - another great piece of fiction by George MacDonald Fraser. This is a great book and in my opinion one of the best of the twelve second only to The Great Game. This story sees our randy coward roger his way from London to Asiatic Russia via the Crimea and the Charge of the Light Brigade. This book has more grand scale action than normal for our reluctant hero who agains shys and cads his way to heroism taking part in some of the most famous battles of the 19th Century albeit against his will. I hope we see more of this great character and hopefully a book will be written on his adventures in the American Civil War. Bravo Sir Harry!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Peter Symonds on 25 Jan 2008
Format: Paperback
Flashman at the charge is one of the late George McDonald Fraser's greatest works. The plot, with Flashman being disgraced in London, ending up in the Crimea where he charges with the heavy brigade, stands with the thin red line and then charges with the light brigade before being captured by cossacks and ending up in central asia where he saves India from Russian invasion is a proposterous as you'd imagine.... except it fits all the facts.

The genius of GMF is his historical research. When he wrote the first Flashman the author must have sketched out the plots for 10 books, checked time lines then researched like no other historical researcher ever. Its amazing how many historical photos exist of famous Kings and Generals with an unknow stranger with big cavalry whiskers standing in the background. My father has a painting 'the thin red line' depicting the Highlanders stand at Balaclava... and wouldn'y you know it- there's a big chap with cavalry whiskers in the corner of the picture. It always makes me laugh.

If you've never read Flashy start with 'Flashman' then read this one. Because they're written as packets they stand alone very well.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Andy (aaamack@omantel.net.om) on 30 Aug 2001
Format: Paperback
A hugely enjoyable read as we follow our 'hero' to the Crimea and Central Asia where he gets embroiled in all sorts of capers. Intent on one course of action, Flashy, as usual, ends up doing quite another and, as usual, comes up 'smelling of roses'
In places this is the best of the 'Flashman' novels I have read (I've currently read the first four). The first third of the book are excellent, detailing as it does Flashman's Crimean War memoirs, but the later sections detailing his
imprisonment in a Russian house, and later, his exploits as a member of a Central Asian tribe fighting Russian encroachment is somewhat less inspired.
The story briefly starts with our 'hero' preparing for war by trying to hide away in the Board of Ordance, but unfortunately for him he is made the guardian of a German Prince, Prince William of Celle, who is studying the art of soldiering, so off to the Crimea he must go.
Once in the Crimea, Flashy, who is employed as a 'galloper' (messenger) is witness to some of the great battles of British military history. He gets caught up in the Battle of the Alma, where unfortunately his charge, the hapless and randy William is killed. But what happens later firmly plants Flashy as one of the great warriors of the British Army; ever !
Whilst trying desperately to avoid any hint of danger, Flashy inadvertently finds himself, not only present at the Battle of Balaclava, but becoming an integral part of it. He becomes a member of the 'Thin Red Line', one of General Scarlett's Heavy Brigade, charging uphill into the Russian cavalry and later, most famously, as one of 'the six hundred' who charge the Russian guns at the North Valley, better known as the 'Valley of Death' in what passed into legend as, 'the Charge of the Light Brigade'.
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