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Moll Flanders (Classic Collection (Brilliance Audio)) MP3 CD – Audiobook, 14 Apr 2015


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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Classic Collection; MP3 Una edition (14 April 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1491586818
  • ISBN-13: 978-1491586815
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.3 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
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More About the Author

Daniel Defoe was a Londoner, born in 1660 at St Giles, Cripplegate, and son of James Foe, a tallow-chandler. He changed his name to Defoe from c. 1695. He was educated for the Presbyterian Ministry at Morton's Academy for Dissenters at Newington Green, but in 1682 he abandoned this plan and became a hosiery merchant in Cornhill. After serving briefly as a soldier in the Duke of Monmouth's rebellion, he became well established as a merchant and travelled widely in England, as well as on the Continent.

Between 1697 and 1701 he served as a secret agent for William III in England and Scotland, and between 1703 and 1714 for Harley and other ministers. During the latter period he also, single-handed, produced the Review, a pro-government newspaper. A prolific and versatile writer he produced some 500 books on a wide variety of topics, including politics, geography, crime, religion, economics, marriage, psychology and superstition. He delighted in role-playing and disguise, a skill he used to great effect as a secret agent, and in his writing he often adopted a pseudonym or another personality for rhetorical impact.

His first extant political tract (against James II) was published in 1688, and in 1701 appeared his satirical poem The True-Born Englishman, which was a bestseller. Two years later he was arrested for The Shortest-Way with the Dissenters, an ironical satire on High Church extremism, committed to Newgate and pilloried. He turned to fiction relatively late in life and in 1719 published his great imaginative work, Robinson Crusoe. This was followed in 1722 by Moll Flanders and A Journal of the Plague Year, and in 1724 by his last novel, Roxana.

His other works include A Tour Through the Whole Island of Great Britain, a guide-book in three volumes (1724-6; abridged Penguin edition, 1965), The Complete English Tradesman (1726), Augusta Triumphans, (1728), A Plan of the English Commerce (1728) and The Complete English Gentleman (not published until 1890). He died on 24 April 1731. Defoe had a great influence on the development of the English novel and many consider him to be the first true novelist.


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Review

"A very helpful edition of Moll Flanders with its informative introduction and especially its thorough endnotes. It is an edition especially helpful for undergraduates who do not have such a broad knowledge of the 18th century laws, social problems, etc."--Judith B. Slagle. Carson-NewmanCollege"Excellent edition has all of the necessary 'extras': introduction and notes, both reflecting excellent scholarship."--Arline Garbarini, Dominican College --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

G. A. Starr is Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley. Linda Bree is Editorial Director, Arts and Literature, at Cambridge University Press. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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First Sentence
MY true name is so well known in the records or registers at Newgate, and in the Old Bailey, and there are some things of such consequence still depending there, relating to my particular conduct, that it is not to be expected I should set my name or the account of my family to this work; perhaps after my death it may be better known, at present it would not be proper, no, not though e general pardon should be issued, even without exceptions of persons or crimes. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 28 Sept. 2005
Format: Paperback
Having avoided watching various TV adaptations and never reading the book before, I was hesitant to read this book. Whilst working abroad the book was a last option on the book shop shelf. I was very much wrong in my assumption regarding the book. It is a marvelous account of live at the rough end during the 17th century. The story moves between London and Virginia and steps from one drama to the next throughout. I was captivated throughout by the trials and tribulations of Moll and her many aborted marriages and criminal capers. I was torn between feeling sympathy for Moll and being incredulous at just how many scrapes one woman could get into and escape from. As stated by others this is also a great account of live during Molls time and also of traditions, morals and customs of the time. I now almost regret not making time for the TV adaptation, although I'm sure it would not have been as good.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By welshgirl on 7 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having heard of this book years ago because of the t.v series I finally got round to reading it and glad I was , it's a wonderful read as it's goes right back the end of the 17th century and shows what life was like for the poor a classic tale of a woman born into poverty and the life of crime shes falls into
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David Williams on 15 Jun. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I continued my current re-reading of the classics in Kindle versions with this one, first read 40 years ago, and I was pleased to have my fond memories of it refreshed. One of the earliest British novels, this masquerades as a memoir, with Defoe handling the female perspective of the eponymous heroine just as well as he did Robinson Crusoe. I call her 'heroine' though Moll's adventures as sometime prostitute and recidivist thief would seem to disqualify her from such a status but for her late redemption and reform. In any case, we never think of her as a real villain, rather one who is forced by circumstances to make her way in life the best she can. She does admit to being an easy prey to temptation, and she is her own best apologist. As Moll says herself, her 'wicked' life is a lot more interesting to read than her return to virtue and prosperity. We learn a good deal along the way about the harsh conditions of living in late 17th Century England, and of the brutal treatment wrong-doers might expect, both from the courts and, if they catch you, from the mob. Humour and romance help to alleviate the gloom which, along with Moll's winning narrative, always keep us on her side even while she commits her more outrageous sins.

Reviewer David Williams regularly blogs as Writer in the North.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Pomfrett on 12 July 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I downloaded this book with a very fixed view of what I thought this view would be about- a bit of scandal, a bit of naughtiness and a fair bit of adventure. All three are sort of included in the book, but not as much as the reputation of this novel might have you think, although obviously modern views have probably affected this.

I thought Moll, overall, was a very likeable character and Defoe has written her well. The scenes in prison were well written (which is because of his own experience in the notorious Newgate prison!) and I found that I did sympathise with Moll. However, it can be a difficult and confusing text at points; I got really muddled when one character at one point was called Robin and another Robert... I'm not sure if that's just this free copy or if it's in the original manuscript. The text can also be a bit heavy going too, due to the archaic language used, so it wasn't a book I read when I was tired!

Overall, a good read... just not as scandalous as Defoe might have expected!
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Luc REYNAERT TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 11 Sept. 2005
Format: Paperback
This human portrait of a woman is also an excellent sketch of the living conditions and the social stratification in England in the 18th century: 'the Age is so wicked and the Sex so Debauch'd'.
It shows the immense chasm between a small class of wealthy people and the rest (Swift: a thousand to one). The latter were struggling for sheer survival and praying 'Give me not Poverty, lest I steal' ... to be hanged: 'If I swing by the String, I shall hear the Bell ring, and then there's an End of poor Jenny.'
But both classes intermingled.
As E.J. Burford quotes in his masterful book 'The Synfull Citie':
Those who were riche were hangid by the Pursse
Those who were poore were hangid by the Necke
Defoe's Moll Flanders: 'the passive Jade thinks of no Pleasure but the Money; and when he is as it were drunk in the Extasies of his wicked Pleasure, her Hands are in his Pockets.'
Defoe paints the poor's religion as fatalism. Moll Flanders is all the time reproaching herself her Course of life, 'a horrid Complication of Wickedness, Whoredom, Adultery, Incest, Lying, Theft', but in the face of death at the gallows, 'I had now neither Remorse or Repentance ... no Thought of Heaven or Hell ... I neither had a Heart to ask God's Mercy.'
Defoe's work is eminently modern, with his psychological insight 'What a Felicity is it to Mankind that they cannot see into the Hearts of one another', and 'Modest men are better Hypocrites';
or, the ravages of alcoholism: 'the Drunk are the Men whom Solomon says, they go like an Ox to the Slaughter, till a Dart strikes through their Liver';
and his feminism: 'the Disadvantage of the Women is a terrible Scandal upon Men', and 'Money only made a Woman agreeable.
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