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Fish Tank [DVD] [2009]


Price: £9.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
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Product details

  • Actors: Katie Jarvis, Rebecca Griffiths, Michael Fassbender, Kierston Wareing, Sydney Mary Nash
  • Directors: Andrea Arnold
  • Format: Anamorphic, PAL
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 25 Jan. 2010
  • Run Time: 123 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002OMYC60
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 10,540 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

FISH TANK is the story of 15-year old Mia (Katie Jarvis), whose life is turned on its head when her mother (Kierston Wareing) brings home a new boyfriend (Michael Fassbender). Set in the decaying landscape and council estates of Essex, director Andrea Arnold reinforces her reputation as a British auteur and casts the same unflinching, unprejudiced gaze and touches on the themes of her Oscar-winning short WASP to create an original and unsettling tale for our age.

From the Back Cover

There are no subtitles included on this DVD.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 50 people found the following review helpful By J. Morris TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 April 2010
Format: DVD
Fishtank is the story of Mia (Katie Jarvis); a 15-year old living on an estate in Barking. Behind closed doors she aspires of being a dancer and practices religiously, away from prying eyes, afraid to show any weakness to even her family. When her mother's new boyfriend, the charming Connor (Michael Fassbender) moves in and supports her in her dancing, she starts her coming of age and the lines between a friendship and her feelings start to blur.

I thought this film was really something special, completely different from the usual fare and had me captivated from beginnning to end. The relationship between Mia and Connor is electric, as he plays the supporting friend fantastically and you are not sure if it is completely one-sided or if there is mutual chemistry. Fishtank is well shot and illustrates the harshness of London council estates and what one must become in order to survive and persevere. More importantly, it shows Mia burning desire to escape her life through her aspirations to dance at any cost.

Katie Jarvis is an excellent actress for someone of her age and shows a full set of emotions, with both angry and sensitive moments, you really start to feel for her in her trials and tribulations. The film is more of a snapshot of her life than a biography; as it begins and ends rather abruptly and nothing is really left resolved at the end, despite this it is a very powerful film and will leave you thinking about some of the issues broached well after the credits have rolled. Highly recommended!!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. Ritan on 4 Sept. 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A masterpiece! The story, the actors, the photography - everything is awesome in this subtle, great movie!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Cox on 20 April 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
'Fish Tank' is by far the best film of 2009. Cinematically, it is a masterpiece. The tough world of a council estate in Essex is conveyed powerfully and unsentimentally. Arnold depicts the harsh conditions that predominantly white working-class people live under truthfully, without subordinating her art to the usual tired left-wing critiques of poverty. She shows us behaviour which would normally be perceived as aberrant - such as primary school children smoking - without passing judgement. Life is harsh in Arnold's film, but there is plenty of it. 'Fish Tank' portrays society's most desperate and ignored and their means of escape - young Mia (Katie Jarvis) wants to be a dancer; her neurotic mother (Kierston Wareing) finds escape through sex and alcohol, as does her mother's handsome and mysterious boyfriend (Michael Fassbender).

There is no Ken Loach style sting-in-the-tail in this film. Arnold is not out to make explicit political points, but one thing she does go out to show is the reality behind the lives of the so called 'underclass', people whom society demonises and slaps ASBOs on in the hope that they will disappear into a corner. The council estate and its surrounding area, the docklands around Tilbury, are skilfully rendered by beautiful, atmospheric camerawork - there are moments we see shots of the moon and a solitary tree blowing in the wind, subtly contrasting nature with the manmade dull grey concrete tower blocks and estate that Mia and all the other residents inhabit.

On the DVD extras for her previous feature film 'Red Road', Arnold commented on how amidst the poverty there is life and vibrancy to the people who live on council estates.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By In My Honest Opinion TOP 100 REVIEWER on 15 Aug. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I had never heard of this film but happened to flick over to BBC2 last night as it was just starting and I must say, I was transfixed from start to finish. At the end, I started googling it to find out more and was amazed to find that Katie Jarvis had never acted before and was actually arguing with her boyfriend when the casting agent approached her. From never having any acting experience, Katie did an amazing job. I have looked to see if she has been in anything else since but she hasn't which is a shame although she has had a baby, so must be concentrating on motherhood for now.
I loved the music and the dance scenes and I thought Michael Fassbender played a great part and there was chemistry between him and Jarvis. The supporting cast were great as well.
I highly recommend this film. I have now ordered 'Red Road' another film by the Director.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Hillwalker on 22 Feb. 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Deservedly presented with a BAFTA award (Feb 2010) this movie, a follow-up to the awesome 'Red Road', is probably one of the best I have ever seen detailing what it's like today growing up in a sink estate. The cinematic structure, the scene setting and the acting - not least Katie Jarvis's spunky, vulnerable lead - is what cinema should be about, not America's air-brushed, short-attention-span hokum. If you care about British cinema, and are prepared to grit your teeth and watch the injustices we put today's deprived youth through rather than turn the other way, get hold of this film and tell your friends about it.
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Format: DVD
I saw Andrea Arnold's "Fish Tank" the day after seeing "Cedar Rapids," and it restored my faith in movie-making. This is a very good movie, one in which the casting, the acting, the photography, the music, and the narrative all work together very satisfyingly to show you something humanly interesting -- "to make you see," as Conrad said a good story should do. What we see here is an unexceptional life, and the story has its generic elements ("coming of age story," let's say), but the young woman, Mia (Katie Jarvis), whose story it is, is revealed with great clarity and great compassion by a film-maker who understands how particular family circumstances, education (or lack of it), as well as economic and social contexts can all work, along with an individual's personal aspirations at a particular stage of development to make her the person that she is -- and the movie is just sentimental (or open-hearted) enough to let us nourish the hope that as her circumstances and self-awareness change she may not always be under the kinds of pressures that she is under at fifteen, her age in the movie.

The story is pretty simple -- Mia lives with her single mother, Joanne (Kierston Wareing), and younger sister, Tyler (Rebecca Griffiths) in the Mardyke Estate in Essex, across the Thames estuary from London, in a low-rent apartment, about which I will only say that the decor and the surroundings tell you almost all you need to know, and Arnold's camera takes its time in capturing it throughout the movie. It isn't a slum by any means, but we are a long way here from Mike Leigh's middle-class (even lower middle-class) settings.
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