Finzi: Lo, the Full, Final Sacrifice / Magnificat / Unaccompanied Partsongs, Op. 17
 
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Finzi: Lo, the Full, Final Sacrifice / Magnificat / Unaccompanied Partsongs, Op. 17

18 Nov 2002 | Format: MP3

£4.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
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30
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4:21
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9:30
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3
2:25
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4
7:30
30
5
2:20
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6
2:52
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2:17
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2:30
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1:40
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4:14
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3:06
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2:00
30
13
3:11
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14
14:08


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 18 Nov 2002
  • Label: Naxos
  • Copyright: (C) 2002 Naxos
  • Total Length: 1:02:10
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001LZOF72
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,189 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Jan 2003
Format: Audio CD
They really shouldn't but they do. Once again, St John's have produced a near perfect disc of 20th century British music. This time, Gerald Finzi has been proffered the red carpet and taken it royally with both hands and legs. 'The Flower Songs' are a real treat, with the trebles outshining any soprano line you care to imagine. A long time in the edit suite, but worth it. Buy it this instant.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Aquinas on 21 Jan 2008
Format: Audio CD
More beautiful English choral music from St John's; I think what characterises this disc and the other discs in this series is intimacy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Padraig Hunter on 15 Mar 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As always, St. John's College choir sing with precision and the interpretation is entirely appropriate for these very English pieces.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Ravishing Music, Ravishingly Sung 8 April 2003
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
As a choral singer myself, I was particularly drawn to this new Naxos release of sacred and secular choral music, some of it familiar but much of it quite unfamiliar (at least on this side of the Atlantic).
The disc leads off with what is probably Finzi's most popular sacred choral work, 'God is gone up with a triumphal shout,' set to a text by Edward Taylor. The opening organ fanfare is followed by sung fanfares with men's voices echoing those of the trebles. [The choir in this recording is that of St. John's College, Cambridge, and as such follows the Anglican tradition choirs consisting of boy sopranos, male altos, tenors and basses. There are some who dislike this sound but I find it very attractive, and of course it is the sound that Finzi surely heard in his mind's ear as he was writing these pieces.] The piece has colorful choral and organ writing that mirrors such words as 'Methinks I see Heaven's sparkling couriers fly.'
This is followed by 'Magnificat,' Op. 36 (Finzi's only American commission, written for the choirs of Smith and Amherst Colleges), a moving setting without the usual concluding 'Gloria', that begins with an exulting 'My soul doth magnify the Lord' and ends on the words 'for ever and ever' gradually dying away to the final 'Amen.'
'God is gone up' is the second of three sacred pieces in Opus 27. The other two are included (although not in consecutive order). They are 'My lovely one,' and 'Welcome sweet and sacred feast.' The latter is a setting of Henry Vaughan's poem celebrating the poet's redemption through religious conversion ('Dead was I, and deep in trouble'). It contains a meltingly beautiful passage on the words 'O rose of Sharon! O the Lily of the Valley!'
There are two part-songs for male voices, the a cappella 'Thou didst delight my eyes,' Op. 32, and one set to the famous passage from Ecclesiastes, 'Let us now praise famous men,' Op. 35. The latter, in two-part harmony, is notable for its Elgarian treading bass in the organ.
'Seven Unaccompanied Partsongs,' Op. 17, are set to texts by Robert Bridges. They are lyrical and tender and the part-writing is especially grateful to sing. The joyous 'My Spirit Sang All Day' is a particular favorite of small choirs. (For American readers/singers I will add that these songs remind me harmonically and in tone of those in Randall Thompson's 'Frostiana.')
The final and longest piece here is 'Lo, the Full, Final Sacrifice,' Op. 26, a 14-minute festival anthem set to Crashaw's elegant translation of Aquinas's 'Adoro te' and 'Lauda Sion.' It starts with a longish organ introduction and features a cappella and accompanied passages and short solos following the poetry's verse structure. There are some ecstatically lovely melodies, particularly at the words 'Jesu, Master, just and true' and at the final 'Amen.'
The singing here is impeccable and stylish. The recorded sound is all one could ask. Another triumph for St. John's, Cambridge, its conductor, Christopher Robinson, and for Naxos.
A hearty recommendation.
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