Finzi: I Said To Love / Let Us Garlands Bring / Before and After Summer (English Song, Vol. 12)
 
See larger image
 

Finzi: I Said To Love / Let Us Garlands Bring / Before and After Summer (English Song, Vol. 12)

1 May 2005 | Format: MP3

£4.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:10
30
2
3:26
30
3
0:56
30
4
1:46
30
5
2:07
30
6
3:09
30
7
3:29
30
8
1:34
30
9
5:42
30
10
1:41
30
11
2:37
30
12
3:24
30
13
2:35
30
14
2:53
30
15
2:38
30
16
6:38
30
17
1:51
30
18
3:05
30
19
2:01
30
20
2:57
30
21
4:31


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 May 2005
  • Label: Naxos
  • Copyright: (C) 2005 Naxos
  • Total Length: 1:01:19
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001LYK16M
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,373 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By J Scott Morrison HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Jun 2005
Format: Audio CD
Finzi experienced great and devastating losses early in his life -- his father when he was eight, his main teacher Ernest Farrar in World War I, as well as his three elder brothers -- and he became a withdrawn, introspective man deeply attracted by poetry and most especially the dark and pessimistic poems of Thomas Hardy. He once wrote a friend of Hardy's Collected Poems, 'If I had to be cut off from everything THAT would be the one book I should choose.' Most of his songs, indeed, were set to Hardy poems. Here we have two of his Hardy song sets, 'I Said to Love' and 'Before and After Summer.' Also included are his settings of songs from Shakespeare's plays, including the well-known 'Who is Silvia?,' 'It was a lover and his lass,' and 'Come away, come away, death.'
There are two songs here that stand, for me, among the very best English songs of the twentieth century. 'I said to love,' the last from the set of that name, and 'Fear no more the heat o' the sun,' from the Shakespeare set.
'I said to love' was completed by Finzi just a month before his death in 1956. Its utter desolation is seen in these lines:
'I said to Love,
"Thou art not young, thou art not fair,
No elfin darts, no cherub air,
Nor swan, nor dove are things;
but features pitiless, and iron daggers of distress,"
I said to Love.
"Depart, then, Love!"'
and matched by the keening of the vocal line. The composer rarely raises his voice in any of his works, but there is, just after the final
'"Mankind shall cease. - so let it be," I said to Love,'
Finzi conveys his anger, bitterness and hurt in an unusual, for him, extended, even ugly, piano cadenza that all but shouts his pain. An extraordinary song.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Dr D R S Long on 17 May 2005
Format: Audio CD
A wonderful introduction to these Finzi songs. Gerald Finzi (1901 - 56) wrote orchestral, chamber and choral music but is chiefly remembered for his songs. These include 5 cycles of settings of Thomas Hardy. Two of these are included on this disc - the very approachable cycle 'I said to love' and 'Before and After Summer'. If you have not enjoyed the late romantic lyricism of Finzi, then do not hesitate! Also included is his Shakespeare cycle 'Let us Garlands Bring'. All this for less than a fiver. Let's hope Naxos bring out the other cycles soon. Roderick Williams sings beautifully, and he is ably accompanied by Iain Burnside.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Shakespeare and Hardy Songs by Finzi, Beautifully Done 8 Jun 2005
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Finzi experienced great and devastating losses early in his life -- his father when he was eight, his main teacher Ernest Farrar in World War I, as well as his three elder brothers -- and he became a withdrawn, introspective man deeply attracted by poetry and most especially the dark and pessimistic poems of Thomas Hardy. He once wrote a friend of Hardy's Collected Poems, 'If I had to be cut off from everything THAT would be the one book I should choose.' Most of his songs, indeed, were set to Hardy poems. Here we have two of his Hardy song sets, 'I Said to Love' and 'Before and After Summer.' Also included are his settings of songs from Shakespeare's plays, including the well-known 'Who is Silvia?,' 'It was a lover and his lass,' and 'Come away, come away, death.'

There are two songs here that stand, for me, among the very best English songs of the twentieth century. 'I said to love,' the last from the set of that name, and 'Fear no more the heat o' the sun,' from the Shakespeare set.

'I said to love' was completed by Finzi just a month before his death in 1956. Its utter desolation is seen in these lines:

'I said to Love,
"Thou art not young, thou art not fair,
No elfin darts, no cherub air,
Nor swan, nor dove are things;
but features pitiless, and iron daggers of distress,"
I said to Love.
"Depart, then, Love!"'

and matched by the keening of the vocal line. The composer rarely raises his voice in any of his works, but there is, just after the final

'"Mankind shall cease. - so let it be," I said to Love,'

Finzi conveys his anger, bitterness and hurt in an unusual, for him, extended, even ugly, piano cadenza that all but shouts his pain. An extraordinary song.

Shakespeare's 'Fear no more the heat o' the sun,' (Cymbeline IV, 2) tells of the inevitability and welcome relief of death:

'Fear no more the heat o' the sun,
Nor the furious winter's rages;
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages:
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney-sweepers, come to dust'

Finzi's word-setting as well as the piano commentary are given a haunting 6/4 melody that, once heard, will remain in memory.

Baritone Roderick Williams, a singer previously unknown to me, sings with rich voice, sensitive flexibility, wide dynamic range, and grace. He is accompanied by Iain Burnside, a pianist who is the creative presenter of BBC Three's treasurable 'Voices' program. He is sensitive partner for the singer.

This is a valuable volume, Number 12, in The English Song Series being brought out by Naxos. Finzi is a wonderful song-writer and his songs are here given wonderful performances.

Note: No texts are printed in the enclosed booklet, but are available at the Naxos website ([...])

Scott Morrison
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Absolutely wonderful 30 May 2010
By G.D. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Gerald Finzi might not have had the broadest compositional range among British twentieth century composers, but many of his songs are still marvelous creations; gorgeous melodies that serve to support the text rather than fight against it - rather providing completely apt, subtle colorations to emphasize the meanings of the words - superbly singable (and important and often overlooked point), often achingly wistful and beautiful. Naxos is in the business of recording them all, it seems, and we should be grateful for the opportunity to have them as excellently sung as they are by Roderick Williams.

The volume at hand might also be the very strongest in the series, containing as it does some of Finzi's most marvelous song cycles (two to Hardy texts while one, Let us Garlands Bring, to Shakespeare), full of striking, thoroughly memorable melodies and subtly contrasted moods. Of course, there is a pervasive atmosphere of wistfulness and yearning ere, but the programme never becomes one-dimensional or repetitive. Partially, this is because of Williams's admirable singing. His voice is warm and expressive and he articulates the words so well that texts are really superfluous, carefully phrased and with a masterly command of subtle colors. His partner Iain Burnside sounds as committed as Williams, always providing a perfect balance between singer and piano and even suggesting striking dialogues between singer and piano where appropriate. The sound quality is superb as well, and this is an absolute winner of a disc.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Garlands of Goodness 8 Dec 2011
By christopher - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
These kinds of song cycles are often the finest examples of pure music-making: a singer and a pianist in a room. What else do you need?

The quality of the compositions accepted as a given (see J Scott Morrison above), I *so* wish more people would listen to real musicians like Williams and Burnside making real music instead of the manipulated noise that we are subjected to in popular media. There is more musicality and more humanity in one measure of I Said To Love than in the entirety of whatever was played on commercial radio today, which is just incredibly disappointing.

The songs are each breaths of fresh air, the musicality of the performers is superb and the quality of the recording is excellent. This may be the best ~$8 you ever spend.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Superb 24 Feb 2008
By Thistle Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Seeing Scott Morrison's review, I don't have to write one. Of all the reviewers in this rather broad, however classical, genre, I know that if I play monkey-see-monkey-do with Dr. Morrison, I can't go wrong.

Nancy Eckert
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?