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Finding Darwin's God: A Scientist's Search for Common Ground Between God and Evolution (P.S.) Paperback – 3 May 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; annotated edition edition (3 May 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061233501
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061233500
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.1 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 368,764 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

An act of intellectual daring and spiritual integrity...a refreshing departure fromthe tired polemics of the evolution wars. (Book List, starred review)

About the Author

Kenneth R. Miller, a recipient of numerous awards for outstanding teaching, is a cell biologist, a professor of biology at Brown University, and the coauthor of widely used high school and college biology textbooks. In addition, he has written articles that have appeared in numerous scientific journals and magazines, including Nature, Scientific American, Cell, and Discover. He lives in Rehoboth, Massachussetts.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Craig J. Hawkins on 11 July 2006
Format: Paperback
Miller's book is an attack on Creationism but not creation. He believes in God but not a God of the gaps or an Intelligent Designer (qua Behe/Irreducible Complexity). ...Indeed, Miller gives several examples of claimed irreducibly complex organisms the kind Intelligent Design advocates use and shows very convincingly, that they are actually reducible. He actually did the same thing in the Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District trial, demonstrating the reducibility of the Bacterial Flagellum, Michael Behe's favourite demonstrative organism, for claimed Irreducible Complexity.

Miller actually defends God not through scripture but ironically through Darwin's evolution. He attempts to show that one can be both an evolutionist and a theist.

My favourite chapter in this book has to be "The Road Back Home" ...I would happily give this book Five Stars for this chapter alone. For the none scientific amongst us and that includes me, this gives an excellent laymans rudimentary understanding of quantum mechanics. I never understood Einstein's comment "God doesn't play dice" until I read this chapter, now I get it, this is not the purpose of the chapter though, the purpose goes something like this: A light beam is a wave, which is deterministic as a wave, thus, a light wave hits a mirror and one can determine that the light will be reflected... However, light waves consist of particles called quanta... Because these particles act at the quantum level they do something rather strange. A percentage of the particles aren't reflected but actually pass through the mirror. Now it has been shown that this quantum behaviour is non-deterministic in that, the actually particles which pass through the mirror can never be predicted... Thus, at the quantum level "God does play dice".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Magnus Johnson on 30 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
Having been thoroughly disappointed by "The Dawkins Delusion" I've been looking for a sensible counter to Dawkin's brilliant, if brash, book (The God Delusion) that in my view destroys teh concept of religion of any sort. The first 187 pages of Miller's book are a very well evidenced and at times humorous deconstruction of the nutty end of Christianity - the folks that believe the world was created a few years ago and that evolution is just a theory. While reading the first half I was aware that I was waiting for the chapter where the author would show his true colours. On page 188 he says "That may be fine for members of the intellectual elite, but if ordinary people were to discover that the ethical and moral principles derived from religion were nothing more than a convenient social fiction, all hell might break loose. They might behave as if anything were permitted, and society would come apart in a flash"

Oh dear. There are so many things wrong with this statement I don't know where to begin!

However after a few bumpy pages, Miller rescues himself a little with some very interesting thoughts on how quantum physics supports the idea of a God. I'm not convinced by his argument but this is an excellent, enjoyable and thought provoking read.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Cardinal Fang on 23 April 2008
Format: Paperback
Let me start by saying that both Christian and Atheist fundamentalists will HATE this book! This is a book that shows beyond doubt that religion and science need not be in conflict and the aims of one can be entirely compatable with the other. The fundamentalists on either side would much rather have us believe that having faith in God prevents you having faith in science and vice versa.

This is a book that is both entertaining and written so that it is understandable to those of us without any scientific training. Despite the fact that this book deals with some weighty subjects such as molecular biology, geology and particle physics, there is no point at which you think "this is too complicated for me" and yet you never feel he's talking down to you.

Miller shows that not only are the arguments of the creationists and the proponents of ID wrong, they are also incompatible with true belief - they impose human limits on God and the way He can act. He also shows that those scientists who try to claim that evolution and modern science has shown that God doesn't exist use similarly flawed reasoning.

Miller shows that science and religion can co-exist and more than that, that science shows us a God-created universe that is infinately more subtle, more complex and more fantastic than anything the "puff-of-smoke" creationists could ever envisage.

Forget Dawkins. If you are trully interested in the evolution/ religion debate read this. If you think the world is only 6000 years old - I wouldn't.
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Format: Paperback
It's been a fair while since I've engaged much with the creationism-evolution wars as they can be pretty exasperating. While I favour good science over second-rate rhetoric, some of the pro-science writers I have read come across a little too strident and ungracious. So it was with some trepidation that I approached this book.

The book seems quite decidedly broken into two halves. The first 5 chapters are very much focused on biology. This section is a real page turner. Although the proof reader wasn't up to their job, as there numerous typos throughout, the writing style of the author shines through. Miller gives a stout defence of evolution, building very much on his expertise as a biology professor.

He looks at some of the schools of thought that are opposed to the acceptance of the evidence for evolution and provides a cutting critique into creationism and intelligent design. Along the way, we are given some great examples of how evolution has occurred throughout at the ages, and how the theory has developed, with some interesting pages on Stephen Jay Gould and the theory of punctuated equilibrium. Unlike some writers, Miller does not resort to name-calling or insulting those who object to evolution. Instead, he is quite gracious, doesn't disparage their intelligence and simply shows them why they are mistaken.

The pertinent question that is then asked by Miller is this: Why does evolution raise the hackles so much? Or rather, why do some choose to become creationists or ID advocates in the face of the evidence in favour of evolution? This marks a sea change in the tone of the book where Miller then steps away from strict biology and veers more into sociological and religious territory.
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