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Financial Vipers of Venice : Alchemical Money, Magical Physics, and Banking in the Middle Ages and Renaissance [Paperback]

Joseph P. Farrell
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
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Book Description

24 Oct 2013
In the sequel to Babylon's Banksters (Feral House, 2010), the banksters have moved from Mesopotamia to Venice. They have manipulated popes and bullion prices, sacked Constantinople, and suppressed secrets threatening their financial supremacy. Some people might wonder how an excursion into mediaeval matters could shed light on the debate on finance, commerce, credit and debt in today's world. Farrell argues that the modern global economy began in the Middle Ages, when ideas like bonds, national debts and private banking began for perceptible and specific reasons.

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Financial Vipers of Venice : Alchemical Money, Magical Physics, and Banking in the Middle Ages and Renaissance + Covert Wars And The Clash Of Civilizations: UFOS, Oligarchs and Space Secrecy + Babylon's Banksters
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Product details

  • Paperback: 269 pages
  • Publisher: FERAL HOUSE (24 Oct 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936239736
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936239733
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 173,125 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
By D&D TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Here is the sequel to "Babylon's Banksters", a favourite for me, of Farrell's many books. It reveals how, since ancient times, an international banking class has consistently aligned itself with religion, for the purpose of giving their financial activities the sanction of the temple and thereby cloaking their consistently criminal actions but also to access the residues of a lost science and technology, as well as the implications of a hidden physics behind human financial/economic activity.

This book is a more philosophical discourse on the same subject, focusing on the powerful families of medieval and Renaissance Venice, their roots in ancient Babylon, the sudden rise of coinage in many parts of the world around the same time and how it presents limitless potential for manipulation. (In "History: Fiction or Science", Fomenko dates the start of European coinage to XII-XIV centuries, close to the start of book printing in the XV century.) Farrell also presents, as an overview, the metaphysical basis of debt - and how life itself is considered debt (and guilt) based by these families, twisting the more ancient view of life as part of general, free and fertile, abundance.

One part of the book quotes freely from Graeber's "Debt: The First 5,000 Years" which I particularly enjoyed reading, a fascinating exploration of debt and its relationship to money, economic systems, and society itself. Graeber comes from his anthropology training and broadens his investigation into an extraordinarily ambitious overview of the entire span of written history.

Another part looks at corporations/companies, created by the same cabal. There is a very interesting review of the medieval super-companies.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars how debt and indebtedness affect our lives 4 Jun 2014
Format:Paperback
As he states on the title page, this is a sequel to Joseph Farrell’s earlier book, Babylon’s Banksters. A prolific writer (I’m not sure how he’s been able to publish so many books over just a few short years), we hope Farrell continues this “series within a series” by bringing us right up to today’s economic situation. No doubt he will. In any case, this offering makes the reader think very deeply about what money is, how debt and indebtedness affect our lives, and the relationship between society’s “elites” and the rest of us who they maintain as their financial “slaves”. And he does it in an historical perspective to show us that not much has changed in hundreds of years. It made the hairs on the back of my neck bristle as I was made to see the inequities, the lying, and the subterfuge perpetrated on the masses by the world’s banker-merchants---those we often mistakenly view as “corporate heroes”.

Our author’s principle thesis (and he provides ample proof of it in a scholarly fashion) is that “there is a deep and abiding relationship between a culture’s view of physics and cosmology and its views of finance and credit.” At the outset he poses the fundamental question: What and who does money really represent? Or, more specifically, how did money begin as a metaphysical phenomenon with overriding “ties to a cosmological and indeed topological and alchemical metaphor of the physical medium, then to transmute itself into the conception that money is bullion, and then once again to transmute itself back to a purely metaphysical construct of credit and debt denominated on tokens of paper?” He attempts to answer this question from a conspiratorial viewpoint involving the oligarchical “super-companies” of Florence and Venice in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth a look 13 Jan 2014
By nonnie
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Not for the faint hearted, and only readable to those who can think!! A really good book and highly recommended read
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  14 reviews
36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What happened in Venice? 3 Oct 2013
By Steven Franklin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Are there hidden connections between Giordano Bruno, Christopher Columbus, ancient mapmakers, the Fourth Crusade, the Protestant Reformation and the ancient topological metaphor? Dr. Farrell believes so. The obvious answer to these is the city-state of Venice, but he believes there is much more to the story than just a place. For in his reasoned opinion, based on serious reflection, observation and analysis, the story is not just about a small, but ambitious city-state who desired control of a geopolitical empire by bullion trade, currency manipulation and subterfuge. In his opinion the real story is about the occult philosophy, based on the remnants of an ancient science and economic philosophy, that was guiding an ancient oligarchy's actions and activities during a transformational period of history. To his credit, he does not view history topically (e.g. World history, Church history, Reformation history, history of science, history of cartography, history of banking, occult history, etc.) In his hands history is the fabric woven from all of these strands of topical information combined into one particular pattern-- and in this case, Venice is firmly positioned like a spider in the middle as its source and architect. As a continuation in the line of books starting with The Cosmic War, and including Babylon's Banksters, Genes, Giants, Monsters and Men, and Grid of the Gods, Financial Vipers of Venice adds one more layer in a developing hypothesis of at least two surviving elites from an ancient civilization of antiquity which blew itself apart in an ancient war. Like his previous works Financial Vipers of Venice is densely packed with information drawn from a variety of sources and fields of study. Though each reference cited is not thoroughly analyzed from every possible angle, Dr. Farrell does consistently labor to identify each of the necessary strands needed to support his position in an essay format. Those who demand greater academic rigor may find this book to be a major disappointment. (Unlike J. R. R. Tolkien, Dr. Farrell does not have the luxury of an Oxford chair with a small set of students in his charge. Yet, it would be unwise to assume his pursuit of unity and detail is any less passionate.) Those who will approach this book with an open mind, and who are willing to follow the prima facie case he continues to argue, may be led to conclude the idea is certainly plausible--even possible. But the most shocking part of all of this isn't whether I believe the story to be true. The most shocking part is the realization that more than one government in the past century has embraced many of these same ideas, given serious consideration to these ancient texts and their medieval incarnations, and acted on them accordingly with experimentation and theoretical research. And like its ancient forms, the same modern governments' response to this alchemy is just as occulted--and for the same reasons. It does make one wonder...
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another layer of hidden history peeled back by Dr. Farrell. 9 Oct 2013
By Kenneth R. Baylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
"Financial Vipers of Venice" is another excellent expose of the world's forgotten or hidden history by Dr. Joseph Farrell. Whether you think Dr. Farrell's high-octane speculations veer off into the misty void, or as I do find them extremely thought-provoking, "Financial Vipers" opens up a chapter of today's world that was written in the 13th and 14th centuries.

My BA degree is in history, but I had never read the complete story about Venice's extraordinary influence upon the world in the pre-Renaissance period until I finished "Financial Vipers." If you enjoy reading and thinking about alternative theories of our world's history, this book will not disappoint.

Dr. Farrell, I look forward to your next book explaining the influence of Venetian financial families in England and Germany after the 17th century.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a complex, philosophical look at money as debt 15 April 2014
By D&D - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Here is the sequel to "Babylon's Banksters", a favorite for me, of Farrell's many books. It reveals how, since ancient times, an international banking class has consistently aligned itself with religion, for the purpose of giving their financial activities the sanction of the temple and thereby cloaking their consistently criminal actions but also to access the residues of a lost science and technology, as well as the implications of a hidden physics behind human financial/economic activity.

This book is a more philosophical discourse on the same subject, focusing on the powerful families of medieval and Renaissance Venice, their roots in ancient Babylon, the sudden rise of coinage in many parts of the world around the same time and how it presents limitless potential for manipulation. (In "History: Fiction or Science", Fomenko dates the start of European coinage to XII-XIV centuries, close to the start of book printing in the XV century.) Farrell also presents, as an overview, the metaphysical basis of debt - and how life itself is considered debt (and guilt) based by these families, twisting the more ancient view of life as part of general, free and fertile, abundance.

One part of the book quotes freely from Graeber's "Debt: The First 5,000 Years" which I particularly enjoyed reading, a fascinating exploration of debt and its relationship to money, economic systems, and society itself. Graeber comes from his anthropology training and broadens his investigation into an extraordinarily ambitious overview of the entire span of written history.

Another part looks at corporations/companies, created by the same cabal. There is a very interesting review of the medieval super-companies. Farrell explains that, the original basis of the doctrine of the corporate person is theological and the whole point was precisely to make sure that an individual could be morally culpable for someone else's misdeeds. As he asks: So how did we start with a doctrine whose whole purpose was to hold humanity corporately responsible and morally culpable for an individual's misdeeds and arrive at the present, when the corporate person can, and has, gotten away with fraud on a massive scale, while many corporate officers presiding over the fiasco have actually given themselves bonuses for their "performance"?

Farrell reveals some of the conspiracies of the last millennium, describing psychological operations, cover stories, false fronts, false flag operations, bullion and currency manipulations, lending money to both sides in wars, control of the state mint: lucrative conspiracies repeated century after century. Towards the end, using the famous voyage of Christopher Columbus financed by Spanish royalty, he reveals how Venice may have had accurate world maps at least 3 centuries before (since the Fourth Crusade) which were eventually stolen by a rival, the significance of Columbus originating from Genoa (the great rival of Venice), how Genoa was rewarded by becoming the bankers of the Spanish royals - and how all that indicates a pattern of a financial elite that actively seeks ancient sources of information while seeking to monopolize and suppress it until that cabal has positioned itself to take advantage, if possible.

This book, however, is hampered by his failure to trace the major Venetian families discussed in his book back to their origin. Farrell repeatedly states that they originally came as Babylonian slaves to Venice. He has not identified the true story, which is that they founded Venice. Their colony in the north Adriatic was named Enetoi (Veneti in Latin), becoming one of the most famous cities in history - Venice.

Also, he writes about the major trading cities of northern Italy without mention of Pisa. Prior to the wholesale revision of history to hide obvious facts, the city-state of Venice was a colony of the Pisan Empire. They formed a powerful force that is never mentioned in history books. Pisa was a famous Ibri (Hebrew) state until the early Middle Ages. After Pisa was destroyed in the 14th century, Venice became the last purely Hebrew state on the Mediterranean in history until the formation of Israel in 1948. [note: these families are not Jewish, they hide behind the label]

Farrell mentions the Morosini, part of the oligarchy of Venice, without identifying the etymology, which is deliberately obscured; in Italian the name Morosini translates literally as "high Moor". This name probably refers to both their appearance and to their being members of the ancient Persian trading families that had dominated the cloth, spices and fine goods trade across the Mediterranean since the 5th century AD. Therefore, the surname "Morosini" may apply to a number of families, not just one.

The Morosini were the original rulers (doges) of Pisa (the Morosini of Pisa were known as the Pisani in Venice). In 1146 the Morosini/Pisani family were banished by the other nobles from Pisa and took refuge in Venice. Just two years later the head of the same Morosini/Pisani family (exiled from Pisa) became Doge of Venice. The Morosini (Moriconi in Italian) were considered the most senior of a handful of powerful families of northern Italy - the same families who took control of the Vatican and for centuries jousted with each other for the papacy in Rome. (The Morosini remained the richest clan in the world for many centuries. Not surprisingly it was a later Morosini (Nicolò Morosini - b.1469 - d.1527) who became known as "Macchiavelli" or "(blood) stained fleece".)

All this and much more can be viewed for free on the many websites of Frank O'Collins of Ucadia, who has also made it his life's work to lift the rocks these banksters hide under, from thousands of years ago down to the present.

Despite this gaping hole in his book, Farrell is an amazing researcher, always drawing together many clues, persuasively connecting many dots by uncovering overlooked associations and subtle hints in many different documents. His books are sometimes tedious to get through but they always reward perseverance: fascinating information and speculation that always challenges conventional history.

All Farrell's books are dry but well researched. The Giza Death Star Trilogy books were among his earliest, explaining his theory that the great pyramid in Cairo, Egypt was a super-weapon in ancient times. "Cosmic War", "Genes, Giants, Monsters and Men" and "Grid of the Gods" followed, also focused on advanced, ancient technologies. "Reich of the Black Sun", "The SS Brotherhood of the Bell", "Secrets of the Unified Field", "The Philosopher's Stone", "Nazi International" and "Roswell and the Reich" all explored "Dark Physics" - a suppressed, Nazi-supported hyper-dimensional physics: by 1945 they had developed the transistor and the integrated circuit, the laser, fiber-optics, and even particle beams and particle accelerators in addition to the supersonic plane, the advanced submarine, and possibly even UFO/scalar technology and anti-gravity devices. They then escaped after WW2 to continue their research, infiltrating and eventually controlling many institutions including NASA.
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a great read ! 15 Oct 2013
By T. McLaughlin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Either I'm getting better at reading the author's books,
or he's getting better at explaining the complex topics he writes on.
I found this book easier to assimilate that some of his others.
And found myself asking the question 'can you get to the point?' far less too.
A GREAT read!
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hermeticism and Giordano Bruno meshed in a vast web of rarely presented information 24 Jun 2014
By Mark J. Bassett - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I could not give this book five stars as I would for his previous work, Babylon's Banksters, because this book is a difficult read even for those with decades of preparation. Also, Joseph Farrell does not have a deep grasp of Egyptian and Greek mystery school teachings; read Swimming with the Whale by Daniel Joseph, the teachings of Daskalos at The Researchers of Truth website, and the teachings of the incomparable American master, Vitvan, available from the School of the Natural Order, to obtain a deep grasp of the Ancient Wisdom. Those caveats aside, the book is a smorgasbord of rare-fine tidbits of information scattered throughout. For example, did you know that Sumeria had a dual monetary system: 1) a debt-free money issued by the government in the form of receipts for grain stored in government warehouses, receipts redeemable on demand by the receipt bearer, and 2) privately issued "monetized debt" instruments (clay debt contracts "wrapped" in a clay security box) that were negotiable in general trading? In the U.S. we are confined to Federal Reserve note money vs. the much maligned alternative, government issued, debt-free money like Lincoln's greenbacks. Which leads to another tidbit, the Sumerian and Babylonian origin of the Jubilee Year concept given "by Moses" in the Old Testament. Periodically, the debt load of Sumerian or Babylonian society became so crippling to the economy that the king declared a general debt amnesty (Jubilee Year) to revive the economy, and he publicly broke the clay debt tablets in great numbers in a public ceremony to achieve (temporary) relief from debt slavery. Farrell also informs his readers that government issued debt-free paper money originated in China, a practice begun in 1023 A.D. and lasting into the seventeenth century. A large portion of the book deals (with great clarity and effectiveness) on the role of gold and silver coins to enable international trade and building very large empires. Libertarians describe such coins as "coined freedom," whereas Farrell shows how the Venetians (and other empires before them) used control of the bullion trade as the premier instrument for controlling the wealth and political power of the world. Hmm. Toward the end of the book is a fine section treating the work of author Charles H. Hapgood, Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings. On this platform of ancient maps, much too good for the cartographic skills of the sixteenth century, Farrell presents the "inside story" of Christopher Columbus, his "secret maps," his connection to the bankers of Genoa, and the full story of the competition between Venice and the "new kids on the block," the pioneer navigators and Atlantic trade route trail blazers of Portugal and Spain. The book is a good read even if made a little too complicated for my taste with too much about Giordano Bruno and his collision with the two great tyrannies of his time: Venice and the Roman Catholic Church.
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