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Finally Sunday! ( Vivement dimanche! ) ( Confidentially Yours (Finally, Sunday!) )

DVD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • ASIN: B001L26IY8
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 270,200 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Finally, Truffaut 19 Feb 2009
By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
Back in 1983 I saw a screening of at the London Film Festival that was supposed to be introduced by Francois Truffaut. On the day an apologetic Fanny Ardant turned up instead, apologizing that the director was feeling a little ill and was not up to travelling: in fact, he had just been diagnosed with the brain tumour that would kill him a few months later, and Vivemant Dimanche! aka Finally, Sunday/Confidentially Yours would turn out to be his last film. It works better on the big screen than the small, but it's still an immensely likeable little number that brings Francois Truffaut's career almost full circle to the kind of black and white semi-noir he championed as a critic. It's one of Truffaut's most purely cinematic films - while much of it is dialogue driven, there are few of the awkward literary conceits that he would resort to in some of his "tell, don't show" movies like Two English Girls, instead letting the character interaction and the loving black and white visuals speak for themselves. Most of all, it has a real sense of fun that even a brief melancholy reflection on the difference between death - something definite - and murder - something almost abstract - can detract from, whether it's Fanny Ardant's knocking out a suspect with a miniature Eiffel Tower, treating the fugitive Jean-Louis Trintignant to a view of her legs as she passes the window to the office he is hiding in or carrying out an investigation in wildly inappropriate attire, and there's a great joke about Paths of Glory. It goes a little over the top at the end, but by then you'll have had so much fun you'll gladly forgive it almost anything. Read more ›
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