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Filthy Rich Clients: Developing Animated and Graphical Effects for Desktop Java Applications (Java (Prentice Hall)) [Paperback]

Chet Haase , Romain Guy

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Book Description

9 Aug 2007 0132413930 978-0132413930 1

Filthy Rich Clients refers to ultra-graphically rich applications that ooze cool. They suck the user in from the outset and hang on to them with a death grip of excitement. Filthy Rich Clients: Developing Animated and Graphical Effects for Desktop Java™ Applications shows you how to build better, more effective, cooler desktop applications that intensify the user experience.

The keys to Filthy Rich Clients are graphical and animated effects. These kinds of effects provide ways of enhancing the user experience of the application through more attractive GUIs, dynamic effects that give your application a pulse, and animated transitions that keep your user connected to the logical flow of the application. The book also discusses how to do so effectively, making sure to enrich applications in sensible ways.

In-depth coverage includes

  • Graphics and GUI fundamentals: Dig deep into the internals of how Swing and Java 2D work together to display GUI applications onscreen. Learn how to maximize the flexibility of these libraries and use them most effectively.
  • Performance: Follow in-depth discussions and tips throughout the book that will help you write high-performing GUI applications.
  • Images: Understand how images are created and used to make better Java applications.
  • Advanced graphics: Learn more about elements of Swing and Java 2D that are of particular benefit to Filthy Rich Clients.
  • Animation: Discover general concepts of animation, as well as how to use the facilities provided in the Java platform. Learn new utility libraries that vastly simplify animations in Java.
  • Effects: Learn how to create, customize, and use static and animated effects—the mainstays of Filthy Rich Clients.

Code examples illustrate key concepts, and the book’s companion Web site, http://filthyrichclients.org, includes extensive demos, utility libraries, additional information on related technologies, and more.

Informal, fun, and, most of all, useful, this book is great for any developer working with Java to build desktop applications.


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From the Back Cover

Filthy Rich Clients refers to ultra-graphically rich applications that ooze cool. They suck the user in from the outset and hang on to them with a death grip of excitement. Filthy Rich Clients: Developing Animated and Graphical Effects for Desktop Java™ Applications shows you how to build better, more effective, cooler desktop applications that intensify the user experience.

The keys to Filthy Rich Clients are graphical and animated effects. These kinds of effects provide ways of enhancing the user experience of the application through more attractive GUIs, dynamic effects that give your application a pulse, and animated transitions that keep your user connected to the logical flow of the application. The book also discusses how to do so effectively, making sure to enrich applications in sensible ways.

In-depth coverage includes

  • Graphics and GUI fundamentals: Dig deep into the internals of how Swing and Java 2D work together to display GUI applications onscreen. Learn how to maximize the flexibility of these libraries and use them most effectively.
  • Performance: Follow in-depth discussions and tips throughout the book that will help you write high-performing GUI applications.
  • Images: Understand how images are created and used to make better Java applications.
  • Advanced graphics: Learn more about elements of Swing and Java 2D that are of particular benefit to Filthy Rich Clients.
  • Animation: Discover general concepts of animation, as well as how to use the facilities provided in the Java platform. Learn new utility libraries that vastly simplify animations in Java.
  • Effects: Learn how to create, customize, and use static and animated effects—the mainstays of Filthy Rich Clients.

Code examples illustrate key concepts, and the book’s companion Web site, http://filthyrichclients.org, includes extensive demos, utility libraries, additional information on related technologies, and more.

Informal, fun, and, most of all, useful, this book is great for any developer working with Java to build desktop applications.

About the Author

Chet Haase is a client architect in the Java SE group at Sun Microsystems. Passionate about graphics, he works with all desktop Java technologies, including Swing and Java 2D. He’s worked with graphics technologies from 2D to 3D and from applications down to the driver level. Chet holds an M.S. in computer and information sciences from the University of Oregon and a B.A. in math from Carleton College.

Romain Guy has served as a software engineer at Google and on the Swing Team at Sun Microsystems. His primary interests are graphics and graphical user interface development. Romain has written for several print and online journals, and he holds an M.S. in computer and information sciences.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Maybe it is because I am a graphics geek, but I always find it useful to have a picture in my mind of how the various pieces of libraries fit together. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  12 reviews
38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fun and useful Java book 22 Aug 2007
By calvinnme - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is one of those "fun books" on Java that you used to see so much of in the 90's but are pretty much no longer written. This book is about building better desktop applications that employ interesting graphical and animated effects. This book was meant to be worked through from beginning to end, although if you are already familiar with the technology that does not mean you can't skip around. The book has plenty of code and some math. However, as in the example in the section on morphing, the book does not try to get into heavy-duty math. If there are open source libraries that do the trick, as there are in the case of morphing effects, the authors refer you to that library. They do explain math if all it involves is something on the level of fairly simple matrix algebra - blurring for example. The book is not a primer on Swing. It assumes the reader has experience in that area. However, some of the touchier aspects of Swing that may not be self-evident to even experienced Swing programmers are explained in the first couple of chapters of the book. In particular, the authors do a pretty good job of explaining how Swing and Java 2D work together, which is hard to find in books and even in online tutorials. Obviously, there is lots of code involved in such a book, and although there are snippets in the book to the point that you can understand what's going on, you'll want to go to the book's website at O'Reilly & Associates and download the whole thing so you can study it and play with it. The book is divided into four parts as follows:

Part I - Graphics and GUI Fundamentals
Not a fundamental tutorial on building GUI's in Java, it points out the stuff you need to get up to speed with the APIs and techniques that later parts of the book build upon.
Chapter 1. Desktop Java Graphics APIs: Swing, AWT, and Java 2D
Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT);
Java 2D; Swing;
Chapter 2. Swing Rendering Fundamentals
Events; Swing Painting; Swing Rendering; Double-Buffering; Threading;
Chapter 3. Graphics Fundamentals
Java 2D; Rendering;
Chapter 4. Images
Image Types; BufferedImage; Image Scaling;
Chapter 5. Performance
Use the Clip; Compatible Images; Managed Images; Intermediate Images; Optimal Primitive Rendering; Benchmark ;Command-Line Flags;

Part II - Advanced Graphics Rendering
Continues looking at Java 2D and Swing. The first pat talks about composites, gradients, and image processing support in Java. The second part talks about Swing components that support graphical applications - the glass pane, layered panes, and the repaint manager.
Chapter 6. Composites
AlphaComposite; AlphaComposite: The 12 Rules; Creating and Setting Up an AlphaComposite; Common Uses of AlphaComposite; Issues with AlphaComposite; Create Your Own Composite; Summary;
Chapter 7. Gradients
Two-Stops Linear Gradient; Special Effects with Regular Gradients; Multistops Linear Gradient; Radial Gradient; Optimizing Gradients;
Chapter 8. Image Processing
Image Filters; Processing an Image with BufferedImageOp;AffineTransformOp; ColorConvertOp; ConvolveOp; LookupOp; RescaleOp; Custom BufferedImageOp; A Note about Filters Performance; Summary;
Chapter 9. Glass Pane
Painting on the Glass Pane; Blocking Input Events;
Chapter 10. Layered Panes;
Using Layered Pane Layers; Ordering Components within a Single Layer; Layered Panes and Layouts; Alternative to JLayeredPane with Layouts;
Chapter 11. Repaint Manager
When Swing Gets Too Smart; Meet the RepaintManager; A Reflection on RepaintManager; Summary;

Part III - Animation
Discusses the basics of animation in Java and the existing facilities in the core language that make it possible. Covers the Timing Framing library that simplifies Java animation.
Chapter 12. Animation Fundamentals
It's About Time; Fundamental Concepts; Timing (and Platform Timing Utilities); Resolution; Animating Your Swing Application; Summary;
Chapter 13. Smooth Moves
Background: Why Does My Animation Look Bad?; What Makes Animations Choppy, and How to Smooth Them Out; SmoothMoves: The Demo; Summary;
Chapter 14. Timing Framework: Fundamentals
Introduction; Core Concepts; Interpolation; Summary;
Chapter 15. Timing Framework: Advanced Features
Triggers; Property Setters; Summary;

Part IV - Effects
Effects are only possible after you really understand parts one through three. Individual effects are covered and explained in detail if not overly mathematically complex. The section ends by showing how an example graphically rich client might be developed from beginning to end.
Chapter 16. Static Effects
Blur; Reflection; Drop Shadows; Highlights; Sharpening; Summary;
Chapter 17. Dynamic Effects
Motion; Fading; Pulse; Spring; Morphing; Summary;
Chapter 18. Animated Transitions
Animating Application State Segues; Animated Transitions: The Library ;Animated Transitions: Under the Hood, or How Do You Get Swing to Do That?; Summary;
Chapter 19. Birth of a Filthy Rich Client
Workflow Paper Design; he Vision; Screen Paper Design; Mockup; From Mockup to Code; But I'm Not an Artist; Choosing Nice Colors; Read Design Books; Summary;

Overall, this is a very interesting book full of useful information both language-wise and effects-wise that I highly recommend.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT Learning Material 14 Aug 2008
By Sean Bartholomew - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book will save you hours of trouble shooting the little things that don't work as intuitively as they should in Java.
I have not found an un-useful idea here.
It also shows you how to make your application more efficient (faster).
The author has already done the timing tests and offer you the results and the routes you should take.
All in all, a fantastic find.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent must have for J2SE 31 Mar 2008
By Noel Lynch - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
To push java's ui capabilities has in the past been a bit of a struggle due to the many ways of dealing with Swing, repaints, events, animation etc. This book is an absolute life saver in terms of presenting a unified best practice strategy for everything a ui developer would wish to do in java. It creates very simple applications with solid explanations of what the code is doing, from the low level to the high level. It is also written in a very personable style and the book moves easily and logically through the related material. I wish I had read this book 4 years ago.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still a great book for Swing 25 Jun 2014
By Marquis B - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Even now, years later, this book is very informative. The tips and tricks taught in this book are a Swing Developers dream. Not only do they teach what to do, but they go into why functions should be used a certain way and what the performance costs are.

This definitely struck me as a surprise because all of the GUI books I have read on Swing just spit out functions at you and don't explain the underlying architecture. After my Data Structures class, this book was a breath of fresh air.

The authors of the book witch roles and you can tell they work together pretty well. Every question that I have had that is interface related is brought up in this book. They wont go into detail on how to create a JButton or a JLabel. Those are Beginners tasks so if you want to get this book you should already know a thing or two about Swings basic API's. What this book does is teach you how to customize many of those things you use as default.

Understanding the layered panes and glass pane was something I didn't even think about before this book. Again, this book will open your eyes to many things you didn't even think of as a beginner. This is as huge jump from books that you will read about Swing when you are just starting. Because I am modest, I would say that this book is for the intermediate level Swing developer, but many that have used it say that it is an advanced book. That being said, the read is very easy if you have a basic understanding of the Swing, AWT, and 2D APIs.

If you feel you are just passed the beginner phase and are encroaching that intermediate phase in Swing Development...this is the book for you.
4.0 out of 5 stars Very technical but well written, a bit hard for the novice like myself 9 Dec 2012
By Mark O. Kelly - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Well written book, but i'm having trouble following it being a novice to JAVA. I think it's more intended for mid to advance JAVa programmers.
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