Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
Buy Used
£4.91
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Delivery, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

FileMaker Pro 4.1: A Developer's Guide Paperback – 16 Jun 1999

2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£25.62 £2.12

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.



Product details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley; 2 edition (16 Jun. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201360691
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201360691
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 19 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,061,374 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Alex KennedyFileMaker Pro 4.0: A Developer’s Guide2nd editionShelf category: Database{Please leave room for 2 line quote hope to get from FMP UK)This book is a detailed guide to the latest release of FileMaker Pro, version 4.1 – a cross platform relational database management system with built-in networking and Web support. Version 4 empowers database developers with the ability to display and capture information on the World Wide Web and integrate it with databases that are easy to share within a work group or across the enterprise. Aimed at developers who need to master the power and functionality of a fully relational Web database, this book will help create professional, networked business solutions. For those who are already familiar with previous versions of FileMaker Pro, it provides an in-depth tutorial on the key features of the new release.This book will explain:· how to ensure you use the most appropriate database model for your requirements· how to publish your database on the Web· how to use Claris HomePage 3.0 to tailor the appearance of your database on the web· how to make your Web database secure and control access privileges· how to use the seven new Web companion functions· how to make the most of ScriptMaker enhancementsIncorporating introductions to relational theory, HTML and CDML, this new edition of the popular Developer’s Guide uses practical examples to illustrate the functions of FileMaker Pro 4.1. Step-by-step instructions for working with the various features of the software are supplemented with tips, tricks and workarounds that make working with FileMaker Pro easier and quicker. Appendices describing undocumented features make this book a vital and unique resource to serious FileMaker Pro developers.CD-ROM includes:· examples of features described in the text· demonstration applications from FMP developers· trial versions of FileMaker software including FileMaker Pro 4.1, Claris HomePage 3.0 and XXXThe author:Alex Kennedy was formerly the Claris European Training Manager based in the UK. He also worked in Germany for 2 years with additional responsibilities for the CSA program, where he worked closely with consultants and developers on their requirements for creating high quality, low cost solutions for their customers. He now provides training and consultancy services for a wide range of professionals in fields related to his experience developing database solutions.Visit Addison Wesley on the World Wide Web at:http://www.awl-he.com/computing/http://www.com/cseng/Addison Wesley LogoBarcode box

About the Author

Alex Kennedy FileMaker Pro 4.0: A Developer’s Guide 2nd edition Shelf category: Database {Please leave room for 2 line quote hope to get from FMP UK)

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
1
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The book has twenty-three chapters and 478 pages. The book includes a CD ROM with trial versions of FMP 4.1, FMP Server and Home Page 3.0 along with some sample programs.
The contents is divided into two parts. Part 1 is "Database Systems: Design and Management" and Part 2 is "FileMaker Pro 4.1 Examined."
Part one has five chapters (61 pages) that discuss some database history and theory. This information is interesting, but really does not help learning, developing with or using FileMaker Pro. For those who have read other third party FileMaker Pro books, the Part 1 may be of value filling in some information holes. However, for those people wanting detailed information on database theory, there are whole books devoted just to that. Part 1 contains an overview rather than detailed explanations.
Part 2 is where discussion of FileMaker Pro starts. While most of the information found in other books is included, there are a couple of chapters with information I have not seen elsewhere. Chapter 14 is "Object Linking and Embedding." for those wishing to know more about OLE. This is a good review for those using Macintosh computer who wish to port their programs to Windows. Chapter 16 is "FileMaker Pro and AppleScript" and provides a good overview of AppleScript. This chapter is good for those who develop on the Windows platform and want to port to the Macintosh platform. For the Macintosh (and Windows) people who want to know more about FileMaker Pro for Windows, Chapter 17 is devoted to FileMaker Pro and Windows 95/98. Want to know about the Window 95 Registry? Several pages discuss this.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on 20 Aug. 1999
Format: Paperback
The book includes some interesting topics such as FileMaker and AppleScript, Java and so on.
However, none of them is complete. The examples in the book do not work simply because they are not intended to work. Also, it has a number of errors and misleading uses of symbols such as '(single quotation) and "(double quotation). It is usual that books on computer languages use different fonts for script examples, but the book does not do this, and you would easily be misled.
CD-ROM includes trial version of FileMakerPro, Server and Claris HomePage. But the sample HTML documents are again incomplete.
This book is for database developers, but the information is actually useless for experienced developers, and helpless for beginner developers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
This book is that it is definitely not a "Dummies" book. 16 July 1999
By phxjeff@aol.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The book has twenty-three chapters and 478 pages. The book includes a CD ROM with trial versions of FMP 4.1, FMP Server and Home Page 3.0 along with some sample programs.
The contents is divided into two parts. Part 1 is "Database Systems: Design and Management" and Part 2 is "FileMaker Pro 4.1 Examined."
Part one has five chapters (61 pages) that discuss some database history and theory. This information is interesting, but really does not help learning, developing with or using FileMaker Pro. For those who have read other third party FileMaker Pro books, the Part 1 may be of value filling in some information holes. However, for those people wanting detailed information on database theory, there are whole books devoted just to that. Part 1 contains an overview rather than detailed explanations.
Part 2 is where discussion of FileMaker Pro starts. While most of the information found in other books is included, there are a couple of chapters with information I have not seen elsewhere. Chapter 14 is "Object Linking and Embedding." for those wishing to know more about OLE. This is a good review for those using Macintosh computer who wish to port their programs to Windows. Chapter 16 is "FileMaker Pro and AppleScript" and provides a good overview of AppleScript. This chapter is good for those who develop on the Windows platform and want to port to the Macintosh platform. For the Macintosh (and Windows) people who want to know more about FileMaker Pro for Windows, Chapter 17 is devoted to FileMaker Pro and Windows 95/98. Want to know about the Window 95 Registry? Several pages discuss this.
While Chapter 21 is titled "Binding FileMaker Pro Files," there is really little information on the Developer Edition program. In fact, it is not even mentioned although the screen shots are from the binder of the Developer Edition. One is left with the impression that binding is a part of regular FileMaker Pro 4.1, which is not. There are also many tricks with the Developer Edition that could have been covered, such as creating a kiosk mode program with the binder and then using it with regular FileMaker Pro.
Chapter 22 briefly discusses external functions and APIs and Chapter 23 briefly discusses FileMaker Pro and Java. Plug ins provide a very powerful addition to FileMaker Pro, however, developing these in C/C++ is well beyond the average database developer. There is a point where a developer may wish to use a plug in developed by someone else. This is in the realm of the doable for the average developer, however it is still much harder development than other areas FileMaker Pro. The same goes for Java. To effectively develop Java programs for use with FileMaker Pro, one needs to be proficient with Java. While a bit easier than C/C++, Java is still beyond most database developers.
My overall impression of this book is that it is definitely not a "Dummies" book and is aimed at someone who is competent with FileMaker Pro basics and wants to learn more. There are also many important issues and features concerning FileMaker Pro 4.1 and the Developer Edition that are not discussed in the book. With the title being "A Developer's Guide," one would expect much more information on the Developer Edition. Since I have not seen any third party books that discuss the Developer Edition in any detail, I think this could have been an excellent chance to fill a void with information.
Should you purchase the book? If you have at least one other FileMaker after market book, then you may find this book provides information not found elsewhere.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Lacks depth and clear writing 23 Sept. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book tries too hard to be everything for everyone. It assumes that you have already worked with previous versions of FileMaker.
If you find sentences like, "When creating the label layout the format is the same as before but wehn the dialog box 'Specify Label Contents' appears it will be noted that this is very much different from what had previously been used." to be clear, crisp prose, then this is the book for you.
This text is merely marginally better than the actual software manuals ... lacking important index entries like "printing", "reports", etc.
My suggestion ... find a better text.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
CD-ROM not useful to experts 16 July 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The included disc is of limited use to readers who already own File Maker Pro. Aside from the demo version of the application, the only other substantive content is a set of example files. These files are pre-fabbed databases for inventory, employee information, etc. They are servicable, but the key problem is that they all locked out. You cannot open their layouts or view their scripts to see how they were made. As a result, the instructional potential of the book is severely limited. Further, the book is so preoccupied with promoting FMP that it never discusses FMPs limitations-an important consideration when creating real world solutions.
There really isn't a great advanced FMP programming book out there. O'Reilly, are you listening?
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback