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Fifth Chinese Daughter Paperback – 1 May 1989


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Product details

  • Paperback: 246 pages
  • Publisher: University of Washington Press (1 May 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0295968265
  • ISBN-13: 978-0295968261
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 13.9 x 1.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,134,703 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
I first read Fifth Chinese Daughter as a high school assignment in 1967. I was taking a San Francisco history course. I read the book as required and then put it back in the library and moved on to other things. 20 years later I found a very used copy in a second hand book store and decided to give it another read. I am glad I did. Fifth Chinese Daughter is a story of growing up in one world and growing out into another. Jade Snow Wong was born into the family of a Chinese businessman who was also a protestant church minister. Her story is one of the tradition of a Chinese family where sons are valued and daughters seemingly less so. Jade Snow Wong overcomes the traditions of her family and her heritage and proves herself in the classroom. She also learns the independence required to progress in American society, taking odd-jobs throughout her high school career; finding herslef in constant contact with a very alien world she has up to then only seen at a distance, a world of American families. She faces critical choices in her college aspirations, when she has to decide between the University of California or San Francisco City College. Her choice of City College, was in the long run, one of her wisest choices because it moved her into a much more representative segment of American and San Francisco society. Her decision to attend Mills College was also a wise choice for it allowed her to develope her skills as a potter and lead her to a new vocation, far from the traditional ones of the period. Her war work in the ship yards is also extremely well told and is, again, an extremely important segment of American history that needs to be told.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
I first read Fifth Chinese Daughter as a high school assignment in 1967. I was taking a San Francisco history course. I read the book as required and then put it back in the library and moved on to other things. 20 years later I found a very used copy in a second hand book store and decided to give it another read. I am glad I did. Fifth Chinese Daughter is a story of growing up in one world and growing out into another. Jade Snow Wong was born into the family of a Chinese businessman who was also a protestant church minister. Her story is one of the tradition of a Chinese family where sons are valued and daughters seemingly less so. Jade Snow Wong overcomes the traditions of her family and her heritage and proves herself in the classroom. She also learns the independence required to progress in American society, taking odd-jobs throughout her high school career; finding herslef in constant contact with a very alien world she has up to then only seen at a distance, a world of American families. She faces critical choices in her college aspirations, when she has to decide between the University of California or San Francisco City College. Her choice of City College, was in the long run, one of her wisest choices because it moved her into a much more representative segment of American and San Francisco society. Her decision to attend Mills College was also a wise choice for it allowed her to develope her skills as a potter and lead her to a new vocation, far from the traditional ones of the period. Her war work in the ship yards is also extremely well told and is, again, an extremely important segment of American history that needs to be told.Read more ›
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By A Customer on 18 July 1998
Format: Paperback
At first I found this book simple and slow, but as Jade Snow moved on through her life it was interesting to see through her eyes, life as a young Chinese girl raised in San Fran's Chinatown. For her age and time she made some remarkable movements as a double minority (Chinese and a woman) during war time. After reading the whole book I went back to reread her introduction which seemed to be a disclaimer of her humble bragging of all she had accomplished. No doubt she made some marvelous strides for herself, and as a representive of her community her accomplishments were enhancing. She reflects how she was raised and gleans the best to pass on to her children (as we all try to do) allowing them some of the struggles she herself grew from. One would hope however in the given day she has revised her stereotypical view of female/male roles and story of God's creation of races with skin color. Overall it was an enjoyable read, and helps to see the world from anothers perspe! ctive. She sends a stong and heartfelt message through her simple description that she could make her dreams a reality through perserverance and the knowledge her family had imparted to her.
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