Start reading The Boy Who Fell into the Sky (The Possessor Wars, Book 1) on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.
OR
with Kindle Unlimited

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
The Boy Who Fell into the Sky (The Possessor Wars, Book 1)
 
 

The Boy Who Fell into the Sky (The Possessor Wars, Book 1) [Kindle Edition]

Chad Spencer
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: £1.80 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
 
Kindle Unlimited Read this title for £0.00 and get unlimited access to over 700,000 titles. Learn More
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Kindle Unlimited
Kindle Unlimited
Enjoy unlimited access to over 650,000 titles and thousands of audiobooks on any device for £7.99 a month, including this one. Learn more


Product Description

Product Description

Top 100 in Amazon's Teen & Young Adult Aliens eBooks on 8/20/14 and on 9/9/2014!


Do you love science fiction?
Get set for a journey across space, time, a dizzying array of unique worlds, and even other universes!

The Boy Who Fell into the Sky


Jeff Bowman doesn’t know that he is anything other than a normal 14 year old. No one does-at least, no one that's human. Not yet.

Like most kids his age in the year 2715, Jeff lives in a building that’s 3,000 stories tall. He deals with all the challenges a normal guy faces where he lives-escaping poverty, making the grade in school, handling a bully gone wild, making friends, and maybe finding a girl that’s more than a friend.

But Jeff suddenly finds his world turned upside down and he ends up leaving Earth to colonize a distant planet. On the trip through the Federated Alliance, a disaster strikes and tosses the ship far across the galaxy to a region of space where humanity has never been. Cut off from outside help, the crew and passengers of the lost starship quickly find that they are carrying armed and hostile terrorists. For reasons that no one can understand, the relentless fighters not only want to take control of the ship, but they are specifically targeting Jeff. Struggling against all odds, Jeff must find a way to survive in a dangerous universe that seems bent on destroying him.

The Possessor Wars Series


The Possessor Wars is a compelling six-book series documenting humanity's First Contact with energy beings from another universe who seek the one thing that we have that they don't-physical bodies. Wanting the fuller existence granted by human form, these formidable aliens will do anything to subject the human race to their wills.

Set in the 28th Century, the Possessor Wars spans time, space, and even multiple universes as Jeff Bowman and his friends make humanity's final stand against conquering aliens who want to take their bodies, their life energy, their memories, and their very souls.

If you loved Harry Potter, Divergent, and Hunger Games, you should not pass up The Possessor Wars.

Books in this Series


The Boy Who Fell into the Sky
The Outcasts
More to Come...

Publisher's Notes


This coming of age series deals with first contact with multiple alien species and the moral dilemmas of teens at the nexus of an impending alien invasion and species war. It is also interspersed with a humorous look at slices of life in the 28th Century as mankind moves outward to explore and colonize space.


Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
3.5 out of 5 stars
3.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
Format:Kindle Edition
Jeff Bowman lives a normal life... for a kid living in a mile-wide thousands of stories tall 'arcology' in a world where there are colonies beyond earth. Jeff, his friends Harriet and Akio, and a growing network of their friends have found a way to make extra money for school, lessons, and programs for their datapads. They rebuilt robots to help garden, because everybody eats synthpaste and real fruits and veggies are valued highly. Their friendship is disrupted when they are separated by colonization, and Jeff begins his true path, following in the footsteps of his father as an engineer on a Spaceship.

The immediate opening of The Boy Who Fell Into the Sky is full of catchups, aka backstory. The reader is inundated with current technology and sci-fi knowledge of how space travel works. The author spends a lot of his first few pages defining all the new aspects of technology, which intrudes into the developing story and drags out the explanations that most readers of young adult will skip over entirely for the good stuff: the story and the action.

I was intrigued by synthpaste, the concept of every food (flavor) from one tube. I was also quite intrigued when Jeff and his friends subverted this concept of fake food by growing a garden (illegally), but the author didn't take this action anywhere. The gardens were a plot dead end and only showed the reader that Jeff was a nice guy and took care of his friends, which he continues to do throughout book, rendering the entire first part of the book unnecessary.

About a third of the way into the book, the author threw in a grand plot twist, giving the reader an "oh no!"moment.

I cringed when I came to this line: "Did it ever occur to you that girls like to do different things than guys?
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars What if? 26 Aug 2014
By SteveR
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This book reminded me of many films from the 60s and 70s - started nowhere, meandered along for a bit and then just fizzled out . . .

In many ways the book disappointed - as a first book in a series the end was very disappointing, as a stand alone it was even worse. The story contained very interesting concepts and a different suggestion about the future. The weakness was in the underlying aspect of bullying driving the plot along with weak adult characters, who were not fully developed, were not the main characters but actually drove the direction of the plot. Secondly it would appear that the plot to be revealed is a temporal based story . . . the trouble with any temporal story is the handling of the temporal paradoxes which result. I'm not convinced the author is capable of resolving these problems in the future books.

Although I wouldn't mind reading future books in the series, I'm not convinced I will spend the money to do so
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow, Great scifi. 3 Aug 2014
By Dottie - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I really enjoy this story. The characters were well developed. It was one of the best books that I have read in the last several years. I loved Jeff and his friends. They had a strong sense of right and wrong and actually looked out for themselves and others. Although Jeff was only 14yrs old, and pretty much ignored by his self absorb father, he help others.
It was sad that the adults in the story didn't prevent the bully from hurting the children. The adults only tried to minimize the bully's effect. Jeff's father had no clue that he was marrying the mother of bully and didn't try to understand. It was sad that Jeff's father didn't care enough to have his new step son (bully) to apologize for his treatment of Jeff. Jeff's father was so blind to the fact that his new wife and step son are evil.
I am looking forward to the next book and hope that wait isn't too long. I will hope for a HEA.
5.0 out of 5 stars A new favorite 10 Oct 2014
By Big Daddy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I originally thought that 'The Boy Who Fell into the Sky' would be a good read for my teens - and it is, But I picked it up and found myself wrapped up in the story. I am a fan of science fiction and I love authors like Orson Scott Card, Isaac Asimov,and Phillip Dick. Chad Spencer is now definitely on my list of favorite authors.

There was no slow start or long explanations of the characters needed. Spencer very skillfully hooked me within a few pages and I have now given in to my new addiction and I am currently deep into book 2.

I encourage you to purchase The Boy Who Fell into the Sky and to give Chad Spencer's works a read.
5.0 out of 5 stars Great series for those looking for a modern sci-fi! 22 Aug 2014
By Shalise Conger - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This is a great sci-fi book for all ages. Readers will love exploring what life is like in the future through the adventures and mishaps of the young Jeff Bowman. Chad Spencer has created a visionary future that is both intricate and intriguing. The array of characters is enchanting, while the obstacles Jeff faces—from school, to rivals, to romance—provide a page-turning experience. Finally, a modern sci-fi for the modern teen!
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Idea that is Undermined by Unnecessary Plot and Characters 29 Sep 2014
By Rachel Barnard - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Jeff Bowman lives a normal life... for a kid living in a mile-wide thousands of stories tall 'arcology' in a world where there are colonies beyond earth. Jeff, his friends Harriet and Akio, and a growing network of their friends have found a way to make extra money for school, lessons, and programs for their datapads. They rebuilt robots to help garden, because everybody eats synthpaste and real fruits and veggies are valued highly. Their friendship is disrupted when they are separated by colonization, and Jeff begins his true path, following in the footsteps of his father as an engineer on a Spaceship.

The immediate opening of The Boy Who Fell Into the Sky is full of catchups, aka backstory. The reader is inundated with current technology and sci-fi knowledge of how space travel works. The author spends a lot of his first few pages defining all the new aspects of technology, which intrudes into the developing story and drags out the explanations that most readers of young adult will skip over entirely for the good stuff: the story and the action.

I was intrigued by synthpaste, the concept of every food (flavor) from one tube. I was also quite intrigued when Jeff and his friends subverted this concept of fake food by growing a garden (illegally), but the author didn't take this action anywhere. The gardens were a plot dead end and only showed the reader that Jeff was a nice guy and took care of his friends, which he continues to do throughout book, rendering the entire first part of the book unnecessary.

About a third of the way into the book, the author threw in a grand plot twist, giving the reader an "oh no!"moment.

I cringed when I came to this line: "Did it ever occur to you that girls like to do different things than guys?" First the author makes the one girl fit in as one of the guys, calling her Harry and then we find out she never wanted to be called by that name. Then the author gives her such a weak personality that is so stereotypically girly that I wanted to tear the pages out. The other females introduced later are no better and none would pass the infamous Bechdel test (a work of fiction featuring at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man). Granted, the female characters are not that bad, but when Harriet tells Jeff and the guys that she wants to be treated as a GIRL because she is a GIRL, I take offense as a GIRL. Surely this novel was not just written to be read by young male readers?

Supposedly these three friends are approximately 14-years old. To me, their behavior and speech pegs them at a middle-school age, not at a high-school age. Their inappropriate behavior and near tantrums give the impression that they are younger and that the novel is intended for a younger audience.

The stylistic choice for capturing Jeff's thoughts became annoying and intrusive to read. I understand the novel was written in third person from the point of view of Jeff (most of the time), but to tell the reader "Jeff thought" every time Jeff has internal dialogue was repetitive and annoying. I wish the author had thought to place Jeff's inner-thoughts in italics or did away with them altogether. Were all of them truly necessary? Probably not.

I did really enjoy the concept of referencing others by Sirsen and Mamsen for Sir and Miss/Mrs./Ms. respectively.

One of the biggest issues in this novel was the pointlessness of the first part of the book. What is the essence of the story if not about Jeff's great problem in space and the first part was a buildup to nowhere with Jeff and his three friends. Understanding that this book is a part of a series might come into play later on in the series, but looking at this novel as a unit in and of itself, it come up lacking in this regard.

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a non-reciprocal review.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category