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Feasts: Food for Sharing from Central and Eastern Europe Paperback – 4 May 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Mitchell Beazley; First Paperback Edition, First Printing edition (4 May 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845334906
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845334901
  • Product Dimensions: 20.2 x 1.6 x 25.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 167,947 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

About the Author

Silvena Rowe is a Bulgarian cook and food writer. Her weekly column in The Guardian has been a huge success. She writes regularly for Delicious and Metro and is a consultant to The Gay Hussar - Britain's leading Eastern European restaurant. Jonathan Lovekin is a renowned food photographer whose work with Nigel Slater in The Observer is widely respected.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Debora Lobina on 13 Oct. 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book couldn't have come in a better time; the cuisines of Eastern Europe are so undiscovered and yet full of delicious surprises! Silvena is presenting us with exactly that, there are beetroot and vodka marinated gravadlax, the best recipe for white borscht, fluffy almond and lemon cake with pomegranate syrup, mouth-watering honey-vodka marinated beef fillet with mustard sauce and a large section on home made vodkas!!!

And yes, plenty of beautiful photographs from as far as Georgia!!!

I think this book is here to stay and I love the unpredictable and alluring content, there is some elegant prose too.

Debora Lobina
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Kentish Woman VINE VOICE on 23 April 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
How nice to find a cookery book featuring food from the less familiar regions of Europe!

I've enjoyed exploring this book and producing some 'different' meals. I was a little dubious that, as a vegetarian, many of the recipes would be inappropriate, but I have found a lot to cook here. Many of the meat recipes are actually for mince, so Quorn/soya can be easily substituted, and there are many ideas for puddings and vegetables. The book is attractively laid out, with engaging photographs, and interesting snippets of cultural information. The only slight quibble I have is with the quality of the actual paper, which seems poorer than is usual for a cookery book of this quality
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. S. Davsion on 23 April 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have seen Silvana on television and her exuberant personality encouraged me to purchase this book and was intrigued to see what type of food she includes in her feasts.

The recipes had a different take on many ingredients that I use on a weekly basis ones ABD have never come across before which is unusual if you buy as many cookery books as I do.

I would recommend this book and try the recipes with Gusto
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By maliqi on 25 July 2012
Format: Paperback
Judging the book by results, not the appositeness of the title, its alleged politics or photography or whatever:

The moldovan moussaka is delicious! I substituted the mince for breadcrumbs and squash for a veggie version.
The Georgian Kachapuri bread is delicious!
The borscht is delicious- love the grated apple! (even without the meat)
The gyuvech is delicious! (but better with added sumac)

The recipes are not all easy to follow and some are time-consuming.
looking forward to cooking more of these gems. Also, I like the photography.
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14 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Ptolemy on 5 Jan. 2011
Format: Paperback
I can only think that other people rate this book so highly because it panders to a desire to learn about the 'undiscovered' (and, therefore, trendy) cuisines of Eastern Europe.

Let me focus on a few of the negatives:

(1) For me, the word 'Feast' conjures up the image of special ocassions, of high days and holidays, when you share food with guests; New Year, Easter, weddings, birthdays and so on. The book never mentions these events, but is focussed on everyday food, including street food.

(2) The book should more correctly be called 'Everyday cooking from Bulgaria.' Take the two, meagre, references to Ukraine, for example. The text accompanying the recipe for Borsch appears to be a straight lift from the book, 'Culinaria Russia.' The second reference is to 'Pampushki.' These are flour dumplings sold in street kiosks; hardly a 'feast.' I haven't eaten one in more than ten years.

(3) Quite why the photgraphy of the book was awarded a prize, I'm at a lost. None of the photos has a caption, so you're at a loss as to what they show. The photo opposite the recipe for borsch shows a dish of grey coloured, unappetising, broth or casserole, but the recipe describes borsch as being crimson red. The photo quality, on matt paper, is not too good, either.

As a resident of Eastern Europe I am very disappointed with this book. Read it and enjoy, but please don't kid yourself that these recipes are for feast days, and remember that perhaps 75% are native to Bulgaria, whereas Central and Eastern Europe is very diverse.
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