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Faure: Orchestral Works
 
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Faure: Orchestral Works

1 Nov 1995 | Format: MP3

£7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £14.21 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
3:38
2
2:55
3
3:05
4
4:39
5
14:07
6
6:27
7
7:56
8
4:57
9
7:51
10
2:33
11
2:11
12
2:37
13
2:44
14
4:19
15
2:20


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Nov 1995
  • Label: Chandos
  • Copyright: (C) 1995 Chandos
  • Total Length: 1:12:19
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003GZBLAE
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 87,383 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By J. Gibbons TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 Feb 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Yan Pascal Tortelier is a fine conductor especially of music from his native France and this delightful anthology is a fine example of his art. The BBC Philharmonic sound wonderful and all the music is quite delightful.

The disc contains both some of Faure's own orchestrations and those of his music by others. The beautiful Ballade for piano and orchestra with Katherine Stott receives what is probably its finest performance on record and both the Elegie for cello and Fantasie for flute are scarcely less fine. The latter work, originally for flute and piano, appears here in an orchestration Louis Aubert which is very enjoyable.

Of the purely orchestral items, the suite from Masques and Bergamasques receives a fine performance, beautifully phrased and articulated. The Prelude to Penelope and the Rabaud orchestration of the Dolly Suite are very well played and conducted. The famous Pavane, in the version without chorus, shows the orchestra in fine form and is paced to perfection.

The BBC Philharmonic are completely at home in this repetoire and the recoding quality is fully up to Chandos's normal very high standard. Highly recommended to all lovers of Faure's music.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By I. Giles HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 28 Nov 2012
Format: Audio CD
For many of those interested in Faure's music, this will make the ideal selection. All that is missing is the Requiem which can be bought on a second disc with some more of the composer's choral music. So, purchasing two discs practically does it all. That might be the ideal, but is this disc up to the task?

Well the short answer is 'Certainly yes.' This is the most sensitive orchestral selection of the music since Beecham's time and is far better recorded. The three pieces featuring soloists with orchestra are all played with style and restrained grace in the Gallic tradition, the pieces being The Ballade for piano, the Elegie for cello and the Fantasie for flute. In addition, the remainder of the disc gives warmly sensitive and elegant performances of more key works - the Pavane, the Masques and Bergamasques suite with the disc ending with the Dolly Suite.

The playing of the BBC Philharmonic is beyond criticism as is the conducting of Yan Paul Tortelier who must have been feeling very much on home ground with this repertoire. Chandos have graced the disc with yet another of their state-of-the-art recordings of great clarity.

This is a really fine disc and offers a very full coverage of Faure's main orchestral output running at just over 77 minutes. As such it should give future purchasers much pleasure and musical satisfaction.

............................................

Some dialogue from the comments section that may offer further help:

I thought that you might like to know that before I buy a recording I now look through all the reviews to see if you have posted one. Your assessments and opinions are invaluable. Thank you. (US review)

I particularly like your format of review.
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By DAVID BRYSON TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 April 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Faure himself thought that the heroine of his opera Penelope would have spoken in what he apparently called ‘un beau medium’. The writer of the liner note accompanying this 1995 issue, Edward Blakeman, goes further and suggests that the phrase would be a suitable description of Faure’s own musical idiom generally, and that seems to me a very fair opinion. This collection gives us well over an hour’s worth of Faure’s orchestral compositions. The famous Pavane is performed in the version without chorus (thank goodness), the orchestration of the Dolly suite was not done by Faure himself but by a colleague and the other works are all arrangements (although by Faure) of music that started life in simpler settings. Arrangements give just as valid an idea of Faure the orchestral composer as original compositions for orchestra do, in my own opinion, but if anyone is inclined to dispute this view our collection here provides a very welcome and very out-of-the-way work for symphony orchestra, the prelude to Faure’s rarely performed opera, title as above. Faure slightly adapted this prelude to make it available as a freestanding work for orchestra. I wonder how many concertgoers these days know that Wagner did the same with the prelude to Tristan. I am not sure I have ever actually heard the latter. All they play nowadays is the Prelude’n’Liebestod monstrosity, but Faure’s prelude, together with the opera it is meant to introduce, escapes the danger of any such fate by hardly ever being performed at all.

There are three smallish concertante works here, all performed more or less ideally. The biggest, and probably best-known, is the Ballade with piano solo.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Orchestral Gems 22 May 2007
By David A. Wend - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Gabriel Faure was a master of small orchestral forms, as this disc superbly demonstrates. I have had this CD for several years and continue to enjoy the marvelous playing by the BBC Philharmonic with their then conductor Yan Pascal Tortelier.

The disc begins with Faure's final orchestra work Masques et bergamasques (1919) which is a four movement suite evocative of French pastoral paintings. The Overture is fleeting and energetic ballet number while the Menuet is a slow and stately dance. The Gavotte returns to the spirited dance rhythms of the Overture and the Pastourale is sweetly reminiscent of a summer day in the country.

The Ballade for Piano and Orchestra comes from 1879 and is like Faure's Nocturnes in mood. The music begins with a reflective melody and slowly builds in tempo to a dance-like melody becoming more and more tranquil and finally fading away. The Pavane is a famous piece, slightly melancholy but with elegance and beautifully composed. The Prelude to Penelope, Faure's only opera, is a good piece of dramatic music writing that sets the scene for what is to follow: the return of Ulysses to his homeland after 20 years absence.

The Fantasie for Flute and Orchestra was written as a competition piece but is certainly more than just an exercise. Although under five minutes the piece is in two movements and beautifully demonstrates the range and abilities of the flute. The work recorded here is an orchestration made in 1957 for Jean-Pierre Rampal. The Eligie for Cello is an orchestration of the original for cello and piano that dates to 1880. It is a reflective and sad piece that was used during Faure's own state funeral. The Dolly suite is an orchestration of a piano suite that Faure originally wrote for Dolly Bardac, the daughter of the singer Emma Bardac. It is interesting that French composers wrote so much music directed toward children; Jeu d' enfant and the Children's Corner come immediately to mind. Faure's contribution is in six movements beginning, appropriately, with a Berceuse and continuing with Mi-a-ou (based on Dolly's nickname). The Jardin de Dolly that comes next describes a garden of the imagination followed by Kitty-Valse (which actually describes Dolly's dog Ketty). The suite concludes with the beautiful and passionate Tendresse and Le pas Espanol, which describes an equestrian statuette that was Dolly's favorite.

The recording is beautifully produced and the only problem is that the tracked are not listed in the correct order on the booklet with Penelope actually in seventh position followed by the Fantaisie.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Excellent conducting of Faure's orchestral music 13 Feb 2009
By R. Rockwell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I must thank the Rough Guide or I would never have tried the excellently conducted by the French conductor Tortelier containing orchestral music of Gabriel Faure. Is begins with Masques Et Bergamasques which is a ballet inspired by a painting by Watteau. It is marked with nostalgia best in the final section l pastorale.. The Ballade is an orchestrated piano work that makes evokative use of the winds is quite beautiful. The Pavane is quite elegantly composed. The prelude to the opera Penelope is filled with appropriate sense of dread, .The fantasie for flute and orchestra was my personal favorite thing on this CD very well played with Richard Davis on flute brought tears to my eyes. The Elegie for cello and orchestra is also very movingly played by Peter Dixon was also used in Faure's state funeral. The Dolly Suite written as a piano duet dedicated to the young daughter of a singer named Dolly is quite sweet in le jardin de Dolly.

Please excuse any typos I have a neurologic disease.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A generallly well-reviewed and liked disc that is likely to please most purchasers 28 Nov 2012
By I. Giles - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
For many of those interested in Faure's music, this will make the ideal selection. All that is missing is the Requiem which can be bought on a second disc with some more of the composer's choral music. So, purchasing two discs practically does it all. That might be the ideal, but is this disc up to the task?

Well the short answer is 'Certainly yes.' This is the most sensitive orchestral selection of the music since Beecham's time and is far better recorded. The three pieces featuring soloists with orchestra are all played with style and restrained grace in the Gallic tradition, the pieces being The Ballade for piano, the Elegie for cello and the Fantasie for flute. In addition, the remainder of the disc gives warmly sensitive and elegant performances of more key works - the Pavane, the Masques and Bergamasques suite with the disc ending with the Dolly Suite.

The playing of the BBC Philharmonic is beyond criticism as is the conducting of Yan Paul Tortelier who must have been feeling very much on home ground with this repertoire. Chandos have graced the disc with yet another of their state-of-the-art recordings of great clarity.

This is a really fine disc and offers a very full coverage of Faure's main orchestral output running at just over 77 minutes. As such it should give future purchasers much pleasure and musical satisfaction and holds its own with the best of recorded alternatives.

............................................

Some dialogue from the comments section that may offer further help:

I thought that you might like to know that before I buy a recording I now look through all the reviews to see if you have posted one. Your assessments and opinions are invaluable. Thank you. (US review)

I particularly like your format of review. They give the prospective purchaser an idea of the style of the playing and relevant comparisons. They are succinct. Keep up the good work! (UK review)

I'm sure there are many other serious collectors, besides myself, who wait for your synopsis and opinion before spending their hard-earned money on new releases...
Thank you (UK review)

I'd also add to this. When you in particular review a particular CD, I pay pretty close attention. I would say the characteristics of your reviews I value the most are the detail and general sense of balance and fairness that comes across. That's a great help. Thanks for taking the time on your reviews. (US review)

............................................
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
UN BEAU MEDIUM 7 April 2014
By DAVID BRYSON - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Faure himself thought that the heroine of his opera Penelope would have spoken in what he apparently called ‘un beau medium’. The writer of the liner note accompanying this 1995 issue, Edward Blakeman, goes further and suggests that the phrase would be a suitable description of Faure’s own musical idiom generally, and that seems to me a very fair opinion. This collection gives us well over an hour’s worth of Faure’s orchestral compositions. The famous Pavane is performed in the version without chorus (thank goodness), the orchestration of the Dolly suite was not done by Faure himself but by a colleague and the other works are all arrangements (although by Faure) of music that started life in simpler settings. Arrangements give just as valid an idea of Faure the orchestral composer as original compositions for orchestra do, in my own opinion, but if anyone is inclined to dispute this view our collection here provides a very welcome and very out-of-the-way work for symphony orchestra, the prelude to Faure’s rarely performed opera, title as above. Faure slightly adapted this prelude to make it available as a freestanding work for orchestra. I wonder how many concertgoers these days know that Wagner did the same with the prelude to Tristan. I am not sure I have ever actually heard the latter. All they play nowadays is the Prelude’n’Liebestod monstrosity, but Faure’s prelude, together with the opera it is meant to introduce, escapes the danger of any such fate by hardly ever being performed at all.

There are three smallish concertante works here, all performed more or less ideally. The biggest, and probably best-known, is the Ballade with piano solo. This, they tell me, is a lot more difficult than it sounds, and that is something I can well believe because it is true of much of Faure’s piano output generally. Kathryn Stott suits me down to the ground as a performer of Faure, a composer in whose work she specialises. However I want to make honourable mention also of the cellist Peter Dixon and the flautist Richard Davis for their sensitive and idiomatic work in their smaller pieces. Behind all of them of course is the maestro himself, Yan Pascal Tortelier whose instinct for the music he is performing is absolute. The BBC Philharmonic respond beautifully, and among them they know how to convey the different feel of the pensive Penelope prelude from everything else on the disc.

The recording is a model of tact, which is what one wants in Faure. The liner note is a little above average too, but I can’t for the life of me understand why in the short quotation from the composer at the start Faure’s perfectly simple reference to ‘le style’ that he most responds to is translated into English as ‘methods’ and German as ‘Methoden’. Methods are not the same thing as style, nor anything like the same thing. Do the translators know some special reason for subjecting Faure’s straightforward-seeming remark to what reads like just a gratuitous and perverse mistranslation? I’ll stick with ‘style’, and I imagine many will.

Methods and style notwithstanding, this is a really admirable disc offering a valuable snapshot of an elusive and fascinating composer. ‘Le style en est simple, correct, précis...’ which is exactly what suited the composer as he tells us himself, and it should suit most of the rest of us.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Interesante trabajos para orquesta de Faurè 6 July 2011
By Manuel Carranza C - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Chandos es un sello muy exquisito en buscar repertorio que comercialmente no se suele escuchar pero que nos muestra el trabajo de grandes compositores - olvidados algunos - y sobre todo que se esmera en presentar interpretaciones de gran calidad como esta versión de obras inmortales del compositor francès Gabriel Faurè (1845-1924)que ha pasado a la historia musical con una pieza muy popular como es la Pavane Op. 50 que ha sido tocada con infinidad de arreglos instrumentales y que tiene una belleza melódica muy particular.
Oimos bajo la batuta del gran Yan Pascal Tortelier en primer lugar "Masques et bergamasques", obra muy cuidada estilisticamente.
La Ballade for piano and orchestra, Op. 19 es realmente bellìsima de un Romanticismo muy hermoso. Magnífica interpretación de la pianista Kathryn Stott.
Muy profunda y con gran influencia wagneriana apreciamos tambièn el Prelude to Penelope.
Podemos apreciar además una versión muy interesante de la Fantaisie for flute, op. 79, original para flauta y piano, pero que aquí lo tenemos en una versión acompañada por orquesta. El flautista Richard Davis es realmente impactante en su interpretación pulcrísima y hermoso sonido.
El cellista Peter Dixon nos ofrece una hermosa interpretación también de la Elegie para cello y orquesta, op. 24, obra profunda e introspectiva.
El cd termina con una version orquestal de Dolly Suite, op.56 bellamente lograda por el sonido fantástico de la BBC Philharmonic.
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