Father and Son and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Father and Son (Oxford Wo... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: SHIPS FROM USA: PLEASE ALLOW 10 to 21 BUSINESS DAYS FOR DELIVERY. LIKE NEW/UNREAD!!! Text is Clean and Unmarked!!! Has a small black line on the bottom/exterior edge of pages. Tracking is not available for orders shipped outside of the United States. If you would like to track your domestic order please be sure to select the Priority/Expedited Shipping option.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.56
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Father and Son (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – 26 Mar 2009


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 26 Mar 2009
£8.99
£3.83 £1.13
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Father and Son (Oxford World's Classics) + A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Wordsworth Classics)
Price For Both: £10.98

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.56
Trade in Father and Son (Oxford World's Classics) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.56, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (26 Mar. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199539111
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199539116
  • Product Dimensions: 19.3 x 1.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 115,289 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Bob Sherunkle VINE VOICE on 15 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback
This is one of the outstanding works of early twentieth century English literature, and probably one of the best British autobiographies ever written. Edmund Gosse describes his life up to the time when he left home to move back to London to start his career.

His upbringing was unusual, even by mid-Victorian standards. In his infancy, his intensely pious parents shunned all except the equally devout of their own kind, the Plymouth Brethren. His mother died when Edmund was seven, and her dying wish was that Edmund become a minister of their religion. His father then devoted himself, ultimately without success, to realising this wish. Gosse's career in literature brought him into friendship with such as Swinburne, than whom Gosse's father could hardly have imagined a more unsuitable acquaintance.

Gosse does clear justice to the affection within his immediate family. He also presents a balanced view of how far his parents realised their talents. He expresses his respect for their achievements - his mother as an evangelistic writer, and his father as one of the greatest marine biologists of the period. On the other hand, he suggests that their piety may have hampered even greater achievement. He suspects that his mother may have stifled a real talent for writing fiction on purely moral grounds ("because it was not true"), and explains - not without sympathy - how his father opposed Darwin's theory of evolution on purely religious grounds, and lost.

The doubts attaching to Father and Son are not of literary quality, but of accuracy. In the preface, Gosse says that he is writing while his memory is "still perfectly vivid", and that "at only one point has there been any tampering with precise facts".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rf And Tm Walters on 7 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book. I had feared that it would be a dense difficult book but I was pleasantly surprised by the facility and beauty of the prose. It is the story of the author's upbringing by his father , after his mother's death. Both parents were what we would now call fundamental Christians. The father was a distinguished naturalist who believed that God created the world with fossils in their place. He was dumbfounded that his demonstration, by reference to the Bible, that Darwin was wrong was met by derision.This is a side issue as the main story here is of an only child who loses his mother and finds his way despite his father's religous stiffness.

There are other interesting aspects to the book. We think of the Victorian age as being one long period but here the author demonstrates the difference between the generation who were born in the regency era and the more modern thinking later Victorians. There are many other useful insights including the observations public health in the 1850s and that the coast had been ruined by 1900 by all the tourists looking for samples etc. A fascinating book that is well worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kevin James on 1 Aug. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A thought-provoking, beautifully written account of an unusually sheltered childhood. In the most controlled terms, the author describes his passage from child to man with a degree of fairness and frankness that lets us judge for ourselves the validity of his father's controlling ways. Although the atmosphere of the Gosses' home is strict and repressive, the book itself never becomes oppressive. It has too much gentle humour and lightness. What is remarkable is how much tenderness and sympathy we feel for both of these people. The father is not a bad man, and he acts only out of misdirected love. Nevertheless, the story unfolds with an inevitability that is deeply sad. Nowadays, straight-forward horror stories of appalling physical and mental abuse sell by the million, but this was Victorian England, and this account of subtler damage done was initially published anonymously, so shocking for its time were the revelations. In a brilliant Epilogue, the author unleashes an indictment of religious fundementalism that remains as relevant as ever.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sebastian Palmer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback
This is a review of the Oxford World Classics edition.

A really great book this, especially powerfully charged with significance to such readers as have themselves grown up with religious fundamentalism.

I came to this very interesting book via S. J. Gould's essay on P. H. Gosse's 'Omphalos', a book that sought to reconcile the longstanding and traditional revelations of Christianity with the emerging revelations of contemporary science (in the form of Lyell's 'gradualist' geology and the 'theory of mutability', then - just prior to Darwin's Origin being published - very much in the air). Philip Henry Gosse, the titular Father, was both a successful published scientist, an amateur whose work earned him a place as a Fellow of the Royal Society, and a fundamentalist Christian, a devout member of the rather severe Plymouth Brethren, a sect Edmund Gosse (who I'll henceforth refer to as EG, for the sake of clarity and brevity), the Son, characterises as seventeenth-century style puritans.

At pains not to caricature his father, EG nonetheless doesn't flinch from portraying scenes that he felt, at the time of writing, must be the 'last gasp' of a dying strand of old-fashioned religion. Indeed, he frequently refers to his book as a kind of witness to a bygone phenomenon. I wonder how he would feel if he could've known that even now, all over the world, millions are enduring similar (and very probably in many instances far worse) experiences? It's ironic that there's the saying 'the road to hell is paved with good intentions'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback