Father Brown 1954

LOVEFiLM By Post

Britain’s largest choice of DVDs and Blu-rays to rent by post £7.99 per month.

Start your 30 day free trial

Existing LOVEFiLM member? Switch account

Prime and Prime Instant Video members can receive unlimited discs, two at a time, for £6.99 per month after trial.

(30) IMDb 6.9/10
LOVEFiLM By Post

Clerical comedy/mystery as Alec Guinness stars as G.K. Chesterton's legendary detective minister Father Brown in the struggle to track down some international thieves. When Father Brown (Guinness) hears that Flambeau (Peter Finch), international art thief of high repute, plans to pinch a priceless cross once owned by St. Augustine, he delights in the challenge. The cross is to be transported to Rome and this is when Flambeau plans his daring theft in the guise of a priest himself. Father Brown, however, is an unabashed master of disguise and gets between the dastardly crook and the costly cross without breaking sweat.

Starring:
Peter Finch, Sid James
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature parental_guidance
Runtime 1 hour 35 minutes
Starring Peter Finch, Sid James, Alec Guinness, Joan Greenwood, Bernard Lee, Cecil Parker, Gerard Oury
Director Robert Hamer
Genres Comedy, Thriller
Studio SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Rental release 17 May 2010
Main languages English

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By C. O. DeRiemer HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 Aug 2007
Format: DVD
"What are you really after, your cross or my soul?" asks the international art thief, Flambeau, of Father Brown.
"Both, of course," Father Brown replies.
"Well, come and find us," Flambeau says. "I'll make you a bargain. Whatever you can find you shall have."
"I accept your bargain," Father Brown says, and we're off into a gentle, amusing and thoughtful movie which stars Alec Guinness as Father Brown and Peter Finch as Flambeau.

Father Brown is a parish priest in an English village. He takes care of his flock, saves the souls he can, and tries to put the erring members on more wholesome paths. He also is eccentric -- or at least very honest. He practices karate, loves mysteries, is very near-sighted, is no one's fool and has great but realistic empathy. "I'm disappointed in you, Bert." he tells one of his flock who is a petty thief. "I'm sorry, Father, it was just..." "Firstly," Father Brown interrupts, "because you did wrong. Secondly, because you did wrong in the wrong way. Frankly, you are an incompetent thief." "Well, I wouldn't go that far," Bert says. "I would," Father Brown says. "You are clearly incapable of earning a dishonest living. Why not experiment with an honest one?"

A master art thief has been stealing works of art throughout Europe and one day manages to steal a priceless cross from Father Brown's church. With the assistance of Lady Warren (Joan Greenwood) and over the exasperated objections of his bishop, Father Brown is determined to find the cross, locate Flambeau and in the process, if he can, save Flambeau's soul. The search takes Father Brown to Paris and the French country side, down into catacombs and into Flambeau's chateau. At last there is a confrontation, and then a resolution that involves Lady Warren as well as Flambeau.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Martin on 30 Aug 2010
Format: DVD
Although in black and white and a little dated, this is a great film for the whole family to watch. It is full of well known actors, Alec Guinness, Joan Greenwood & Peter Finch to name just 3, all of whom give fine performances. An utterly charming film!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Ania Peter on 26 Oct 2010
Format: DVD
I was 11 when they made that film, I saw it first on television I think twenty or thirty years later, I bought a very bad NTSC tape copy titled "The Detective" about ten years ago - and I'm very happy to have it now on DVD. Good b&w transfer, good soundtrack (well, compared to the screeching NTSC tape). No extras, sorry, so what. I love it! It's old fashioned as well in its positive message and happy end, as well in its splendid actors and slow, unhurried, logical development. Good old times! No splatter, computer animation, the like. Just acting, good camera angles, putting scenes together. Alec Guinness is great, filling out this role as any other one, so is Joan Greenwood (in a positive role after all, cutting off her ambiguity) and a very elegant Peter Finch, also long suffering Cecil Parker. I wonder the advertisement insists on actor Gerard Oury: I do like him as a director of great French comedies, but he didn't direct this film, and as an actor he is rather by the way.
If you like film classics, this one will make you happy. You seldom leave the screen with a smile these days. But beware: it will spoil you for all the followers-up of Father Brown. Guinness will always be on top.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Hand over the toffees on 12 Dec 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I could watch Alec Guinness in just about anything, even the proverbial weather report! Nevertheless I'm afraid I can only bring myself to award this film three stars. It is a lovely little story and Alec Guinness is wonderful as always, but I think I found the writing a little lacklustre. Not one of my favourites but a great contribution to any AG fan's collection.

DVD transfer is very good - the sound and picture quality are both fine.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ms. Nicola J. Booth on 31 Aug 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Cracking film, thoroughly enjoyable, Guinness really brilliant along with a cameo from Sid James. Wonderful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 17 May 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There seem to be two main schools of thought regarding Father Brown: that the film isn't nearly so bad as its reputation or that, considering the material and the talents involved, it's disappointingly not nearly as good as it should have been. Although on the surface it feels like it should be an Ealing film, it was actually made by Columbia, which may account for the fairly lavish production values and French location shooting but the trade-off in charm.

First seen returning loot from a robbery committed by one of his parishioners, Alec Guinness very much plays Father Brown as one of his favorite actors, Stan Laurel (a trick he also used onscreen in A Foreign Field and, rather more unexpectedly, Malta Story). Less stern than Kenneth More's TV portrayal, it tends to play up the eccentricities rather than the central drama - unusually for the genre, the amateur detective is less interested in catching Peter Finch's master criminal and recovering his stolen antique cross than he is in saving his immortal soul. In many ways it feels like a bigger budgeted reworking of director Robert Hamer's earlier The Spider and the Fly, with Peter Finch taking the Guy Rolfe role, but while it never ducks the conflict between the one man's idealistic belief in the best in all mankind and the other's rejection of the human race, it never really reconciles the comedy and the drama and tends to give both of them short measures. The deft touch and sophisticated wit Hamer had shown in Kind Hearts and Coronets only five years earlier had by 1954 largely abandoned him as his drinking problems escalated, and with his rather bleak worldview he seems curious casting for Brown's optimism and belief in the good in all people - especially criminals.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews