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Fatal Eggs (Hesperus Classics) Paperback – 29 Aug 2003


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Product details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Hesperus Press Ltd; New edition edition (29 Aug 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843910632
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843910633
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 12.1 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,118,631 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Mikhail Bulgakov was born in Kiev in May 1891. He studied and briefly practised medicine and, after indigent wanderings through revolutionary Russia and the Caucasus, he settled in Moscow in 1921. His sympathetic portrayal of White characters in his stories, in the plays The Days of the Turbins (The White Guard), which enjoyed great success at the Moscow Arts Theatre in 1926, and Flight (1927), and his satirical treatment of the officials of the New Economic Plan, led to growing criticism, which became violent after the play The Purple Island.

His later works treat the subject of the artist and the tyrant under the guise of historical characters, with plays such as Molière, staged in 1936, Don Quixote, staged in 1940, and Pushkin, staged in 1943. He also wrote a brilliant biography, highly original in form, of his literary hero, Jean-Baptiste Molière, but The Master and Margarita, a fantasy novel about the devil and his henchmen set in modern Moscow, is generally considered his masterpiece. Fame, at home and abroad, was not to come until a quarter of a century after his death at Moscow in 1940.

Product Description

Review

'No aficionado of the genre could fail to be enchanted by this so-perfect example.' -- The Guardian, September 13, 2003

From the Author

No afficionado of the genre could fail to be enchanted by this so perfect example’ – From the foreword by Doris Lessing

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Treefingers on 24 Oct 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a very short novel, more a novella really, that is one of Bulgakov's lesser known works. Like most of his books, this was seen by the Russian government as dangerous to their regime, for obvious reasons. There are clear parallels in the plot to the Russian Revolution of 1917, and between the protagonist Persikov and Lenin.

Like most people, I would not regard this work as highly as other Bulgakov novels, it is not even on the same level, for example, as his masterpiece The Master and Margarita. Nonetheless, I would recommend this book as it is a very well-written satire, and the perfect introduction to Bulgakov and Russian authors in general.

The plot is very similiar to one referenced in the text, which is Well's 'The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth'. It takes the basic ideas of this and transplants them to Moscow, late 1920s. There are also echoes in it of another Well's novel, War of the Worlds, particularly in the ending.

The plot revolves around a 'Ray of Life' which professor Persikov has invented, and the disastrous consequences when it gets into the wrong hands.

I would advise any fans of Bulgakov's who have not picked this up to do so, even if only to get a complete picture of his writing. And for anyone who is interested in Russian literature, this is the perfect place to start.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Bosman on 20 Dec 2007
Format: Paperback
"The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth" is one of HG Wells lesser known novels which I read as a teenager and "The Fatal Eggs" takes whole sections of it and transposes it to pre-war Russia. To give credit to Bulgakov he refers to this book in the "Fatal Eggs" making it clear to all that we should read the book from which the original idea for the plot came.

I have read all of Bulgakov's works (in English) and would suggest this is his weakest effort. Without a doubt "Master and Margarita" is a work of genius and I would point anyone in that direction. It is somewhat odd and you can't go wrong with anything else by Bulgakov otherwise.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Mar 2004
Format: Paperback
I have read this book in both the original Russian and in Hugh Aplin's SUPERB translation. He delightfully and masterfully conveys the nuances of the original. This is the perfect introduction to Russian literature in translation. BUY THIS BOOK!!!!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you've never read anything by Bulgakov try this one for starters. It's short, witty, simple but poignant. One-day (or in my case one-night) read. Even if, by the beginning of the end you know what went wrong, you still love it and laugh a lot. Leaving aside political background, satirical sub current ignored, it is a bloody good story (loads of blood). And it's almost hundred years old. Once you'll finish it, you'll buy Master and Margarita. Believe me.
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By Ian McKie on 12 Feb 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As an example of early 20th. century science fiction and a sideways look at post-revolutionary Russia from the inside, I found Bulgakov's ideas interesting, funny and exciting. An enjoyable, gripping and sometimes shocking read.
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