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Fat Wars: The Inside Story of the Obesity Industry Paperback – 13 Jan 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books (13 Jan 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843541424
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843541424
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.5 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 818,938 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

ELLEN RUPPEL SHELL is a correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly and writes for Discover and the New York Times Magazine, among other publications. She is associate professor and co-director of the Program in Science Journalism at Boston University.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lin Kidd on 8 Jun 2008
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent and very informative book however do be aware that it was also published under the title the hungry gene. I was very disappointed when I realised that I already have this book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Fitzgerald on 1 Feb 2009
Format: Paperback
Incredibly enlightening and really very well researched and written. The information is backed up with clear research and studies and I only wish a TV programme could be made based on its contents. A must read if you care about the 'real' story behind health, the food industy and weight.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By HORAK on 2 Feb 2007
Format: Paperback
The author first starts by studying various techniques to reduce the amount of food people can ingest: shrinking stomachs, jaw wiring or placing gastric balloons in the stomach. She then takes a historical approach to obesity which dates back to the Middle Ages.

Scientists have discovered that weight is controlled by a sort of thermostat called lipostat. A reduced obese person is not the same as another person of the same weight because the way their brains perceive the ingestion of food is different. Indeed human eating behaviour is dictated by human physiology and the way genes orchestrate this process. For many people the fact that body weight is biologically determined still does not appear acceptable. The author then retraces all the steps leading to the discovery of leptin, a hormone functioning as a satiety factor.

From a sociological point of view obesity is regarded as a manifestation of moral turpitude. Drug makers consider obesity as a chronic condition which requires chronic attention and therefore try to design medication which must be prescribed for life. Some drugs are actually dangerous like Redux because they can cause nurotoxicity and pulmonary hypertension. Unfortunately the system of genes, peptides and hormones regulating food intakes is extremely difficult to manipulate. Having thrifty genes has less to do with metabolic rate than with one's inability to self-regulate food intake in the face of plenty.

Researchers in England hope to tease out what factors in the mother's diet affect foetal development and child health. In psychology scientists have for decades studied the connection between obesity and what is called the hedonic impact of food.

A valuable study of the war many people fight against an excess of calories.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Chrissy on 2 Feb 2010
Format: Paperback
Interesting concepts and some nice truths but not exactly what I was expecting. I suppose was looking for some of the shennanigans within the diet industry itself. Good read and topical.
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Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A study of some urgent health issues 2 Feb 2007
By HORAK - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The author first starts by studying various techniques to reduce the amount of food people can ingest: shrinking stomachs, jaw wiring or placing gastric balloons in the stomach. She then takes a historical approach to obesity which dates back to the Middle Ages.

Scientists have discovered that weight is controlled by a sort of thermostat called lipostat. A reduced obese person is not the same as another person of the same weight because the way their brains perceive the ingestion of food is different. Indeed human eating behaviour is dictated by human physiology and the way genes orchestrate this process. For many people the fact that body weight is biologically determined still does not appear acceptable. The author then retraces all the steps leading to the discovery of leptin, a hormone functioning as a satiety factor.

From a sociological point of view obesity is regarded as a manifestation of moral turpitude. Drug makers consider obesity as a chronic condition which requires chronic attention and therefore try to design medication which must be prescribed for life. Some drugs are actually dangerous like Redux because they can cause nurotoxicity and pulmonary hypertension. Unfortunately the system of genes, peptides and hormones regulating food intakes is extremely difficult to manipulate. Having thrifty genes has less to do with metabolic rate than with one's inability to self-regulate food intake in the face of plenty.

Researchers in England hope to tease out what factors in the mother's diet affect foetal development and child health. In psychology scientists have for decades studied the connection between obesity and what is called the hedonic impact of food.

A valuable study of the war many people fight against an excess of calories.
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