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Far as Human Eye Could See [Paperback]

Isaac Asimov


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Paperback, 25 May 1989 --  

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Synopsis

A collection of essays demonstrating why Asimov has such a following for journeys into the awesome mysteries of science. In the title piece this author who has written over 350 books on subjects ranging from the Bible to science fiction, we are privy to his thoughts on the future of the galaxy.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There has never been anyone better than Asimov at making science understandable 3 Aug 2007
By Charles Ashbacher - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Most of the science that I know I learned from reading the science books of Isaac Asimov. For years, he wrote a monthly essay in "Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction" covering a scientific topic and they contain some of the most elegant of explanations of scientific principles. Asimov has often been accused of oversimplifying his explanations, but as someone who has taught math and computer science for years at the college level, that is pretty hard to do. The goal is to have the students learn and any method that works is one to consider using.
This book is a collection of seventeen of his essays that appeared in F&SF and as usual they cover a smorgasbord of topics. The essays are split into four categories:

*) Physical chemistry
*) Biochemistry
*) Geochemistry
*) Astronomy

They are a combination of the history of scientific discovery and speculation about future results. Since the book was published in 1987, there are points that have been superseded by events. The most evident case is essay fifteen, "The Rule of Numerous Small." In this essay, Asimov discusses the current evidence for how numerous planets are. Recent advancements in planetary detection techniques have rendered some of what he says obsolete.
Nevertheless, there is no one better than Asimov at making science understandable. Since understanding is almost always a process of successful small steps of comprehension, it is always better to start simple and work your way up. Asimov's writing remains the best initial step in scientific understanding that I have ever encountered.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There has never been anyone better than Asimov at making science understandable 3 Aug 2007
By Charles Ashbacher - Published on Amazon.com
Most of the science that I know I learned from reading the science books of Isaac Asimov. For years, he wrote a monthly essay in "Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction" covering a scientific topic and they contain some of the most elegant of explanations of scientific principles. Asimov has often been accused of oversimplifying his explanations, but as someone who has taught math and computer science for years at the college level, that is pretty hard to do. The goal is to have the students learn and any method that works is one to consider using.
This book is a collection of seventeen of his essays that appeared in F&SF and as usual they cover a smorgasbord of topics. The essays are split into four categories:

*) Physical chemistry
*) Biochemistry
*) Geochemistry
*) Astronomy

They are a combination of the history of scientific discovery and speculation about future results. Since the book was published in 1987, there are points that have been superseded by events. The most evident case is essay fifteen, "The Rule of Numerous Small." In this essay, Asimov discusses the current evidence for how numerous planets are. Recent advancements in planetary detection techniques have rendered some of what he says obsolete.
Nevertheless, there is no one better than Asimov at making science understandable. Since understanding is almost always a process of successful small steps of comprehension, it is always better to start simple and work your way up. Asimov's writing remains the best initial step in scientific understanding that I have ever encountered.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There has never been anyone better than Asimov at making science understandable 3 Aug 2007
By Charles Ashbacher - Published on Amazon.com
Most of the science that I know I learned from reading the science books of Isaac Asimov. For years, he wrote a monthly essay in "Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction" covering a scientific topic and they contain some of the most elegant of explanations of scientific principles. Asimov has often been accused of oversimplifying his explanations, but as someone who has taught math and computer science for years at the college level, that is pretty hard to do. The goal is to have the students learn and any method that works is one to consider using.
This book is a collection of seventeen of his essays that appeared in F&SF and as usual they cover a smorgasbord of topics. The essays are split into four categories:

*) Physical chemistry
*) Biochemistry
*) Geochemistry
*) Astronomy

They are a combination of the history of scientific discovery and speculation about future results. Since the book was published in 1987, there are points that have been superseded by events. The most evident case is essay fifteen, "The Rule of Numerous Small." In this essay, Asimov discusses the current evidence for how numerous planets are. Recent advancements in planetary detection techniques have rendered some of what he says obsolete.
Nevertheless, there is no one better than Asimov at making science understandable. Since understanding is almost always a process of successful small steps of comprehension, it is always better to start simple and work your way up. Asimov's writing remains the best initial step in scientific understanding that I have ever encountered.
5.0 out of 5 stars The prolific Sci-Fi genius strikes again! 22 July 2007
By J. Golden - Published on Amazon.com
His 23rd (!) collection of science essays! Lucid, humorous, and imbued with the trademark Asimov charm, this volume once again demonstrates why, for years, readers everywhere have turned to the good doctor to humanize -- and popularize -- the awesome mysteries of science.
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