Fantastic Mr Fox and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Fantastic Mr Fox Paperback – 6 Sep 2007


See all 102 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 6 Sep 2007
£0.99 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin (6 Sept. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141322659
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141322650
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 0.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (190 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 85,822 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

The son of Norwegian parents, Roald Dahl was born in Wales in 1916 and educated at Repton. He was a fighter pilot for the RAF during World War Two, and it was while writing about his experiences during this time that he started his career as an author.

His fabulously popular children's books are read by children all over the world. Some of his better-known works include James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Fantastic Mr Fox, Matilda, The Witches, and The BFG.

He died in November 1990.

Product Description

Amazon Review

In the tradition of The Adventures of Peter Rabbit, this is a "garden tale" of farmer versus vermin, or vice versa. The farmers in this case are a vaguely criminal team of three stooges: "Boggis and Bunce and Bean / One fat, one short, one lean. / These horrible crooks / So different in looks / Were nonetheless equally mean." Whatever their prowess as poultry farmers, within these pages their sole objective is the extermination of our hero--the noble, the clever, the Fantastic Mr. Fox. Our loyalties are defined from the start; after all, how could you cheer for a man named Bunce who eats his doughnuts stuffed with mashed goose livers? As one might expect, the farmers in this story come out smelling like ... well, what farmers occasionally do smell like.

This early Roald Dahl adventure is great for reading aloud to three- to seven-year-olds, who will be delighted to hear that Mr. Fox keeps his family one step ahead of the obsessed farmers. When they try to dig him out, he digs faster; when they lay siege to his den, he tunnels to where the farmers least expect him--their own larders! In the end, Mr. Fox not only survives, but also helps the whole community of burrowing creatures live happily ever after. With his usual flourish, Dahl evokes a magical animal world that, as children, we always knew existed, had we only known where or how to look for it. (Ages 9 to 12) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

A true genius . . . Roald Dahl is my hero (David Walliams) --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Yi-Peng VINE VOICE on 17 Jun. 2007
Format: Paperback
Of all the shorter Roald Dahl stories, Fantastic Mr Fox is the most heartwarming.

It may not have the wicked humour of The Twits or the wild, extravagant fantasy of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, but there is a heart and sincerity in this story that makes this a special book among the shorter Roald Dahl stories. Yet this story has a distinctly Dahl flavouring about it. Apart from being a tale of the unexpected, it offers us not just one but three revolting villains in the guise of Boggis, Bunce and Bean. I know that like most of Dahl's first few villains in his earlier books, these villains might not be as yucky as The Grand High Witch or the Twits, but their selfishness and nastiness are equally loathsome. Another thing about this story is in how Dahl develops the relationship between Mr Fox and his family. Despite the loss of his tail, he demonstrates his boundless love of his family by resolutely helping everyone to fight for their own survival in the face of the three farmers.

Fantastic Mr Fox is a beautifully written Dahl story that uses simple, yet picturesque language. It shows how the delicacy of the Beatrix Potter animal stories had a passing influence on Dahl's anthropomorphic animal stories. However, there is something deeper in this story. Although Dahl had explored the relationship between Charlie and Grandpa Joe, this theme of relationships between a grown-up and an adult seems to mature in this book. This can be seen through the sincere, genuine love that Mr Fox shows to his family, and how it gave everyone the strength to survive in the face of the adversity of the farmers. In this light this book ought to be an understated Dahl classic, and should also mark a turning-point in his career as a children's author.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By ELH Browning VINE VOICE on 27 May 2008
Format: Paperback
A terrific tale of three mean and nasty farmers who decide to catch Mr Fox whatever it takes. The three vile villains are nasty but foolish, a combination that keeps them on the right side of scary for a more sensitive child.
And so they dig down and down, first with spades and then with mechanical diggers. The race is on.
And then, how on earth can the daring and resourceful Mr Fox sit out a siege and keep his family safe from starvation?
The clever and daring Mr Fox fights for survival with bravery and daring through secret passages and an underground world.
There's a magnificent finale, a great banquet, and my older children (5&7) love Mr Fox's inspired vision of a triumphant new way life for all the underground animals, while leaving the three mean farmers still waiting out in the rain.
With Quentin Blake's funny black and white illustrations on every page and many short chapters, the text is amusing and imaginatively descriptive as you'd expect from Mr Dahl. It also includes those little disgusting touches that children love such as "Bean's earholes were clogged with all kinds of muck and wax and bits of chewing-gum and dead flies and stuff like that."

This is one of my favourite Dahl stories: a short and snappy chapter book that can be read aloud in less than an hour and is guaranteed to hold the attention of a young listener from about age 5. It's fast paced, with enough excitement, danger and momentum to appeal from Key Stage 1 though children (and adults) who are considerably older will enjoy reading it to themselves. And with gun-toting farmers on the prowl and terrible tractors wrecking havoc on the hill, it's a particularly good story with which to entice reluctant boys.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Ek Stewart on 16 Feb. 2006
Format: Paperback
This was the first book I read completely on my own and it is still one of my all time favorite books. I love reading it to my children and to myself in the bath!!!
It is Roald Dahl at his best. Three truly awful farmers and a rather clever fox(who happens to be missing his tail). Definitely one for the 5-10 age group(and for all you big kids out there).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Bentinck on 8 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
We think that Fantastic Mr Fox is one of the best books we have read at school. We liked it so much that we bought the play and we are now working on that. The characters of the farmers were fantastic, we especially liked the way Roald Dahl described Bean and his ears with chewing gum, wax and dead flies. We are now looking forward to Big Writing day to write what happens next.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By ELH Browning VINE VOICE on 27 May 2008
Format: Paperback
A terrific tale of three mean and nasty farmers who decide to catch Mr Fox whatever it takes. The three vile villains are nasty but foolish, a combination that keeps them on the right side of scary for a more sensitive child.
And so they dig down and down, first with spades and then with mechanical diggers. The race is on.
And then, how on earth can the daring and resourceful Mr Fox sit out a siege and keep his family safe from starvation?
The clever and daring Mr Fox fights for survival with bravery and daring through secret passages and an underground world.
There's a magnificent finale, a great banquet, and my older children (5&7) love Mr Fox's inspired vision of a triumphant new way life for all the underground animals, while leaving the three mean farmers still waiting out in the rain.
With Quentin Blake's funny black and white illustrations on every page and many short chapters, the text is amusing and imaginatively descriptive as you'd expect from Mr Dahl. It also includes those little disgusting touches that children love such as "Bean's earholes were clogged with all kinds of muck and wax and bits of chewing-gum and dead flies and stuff like that."

This is one of my favourite Dahl stories: a short and snappy chapter book that can be read aloud in less than an hour and is guaranteed to hold the attention of a young listener from about age 5. It's fast paced, with enough excitement, danger and momentum to appeal from Key Stage 1 though children (and adults) who are considerably older will enjoy reading it to themselves. And with gun-toting farmers on the prowl and terrible tractors wrecking havoc on the hill, it's a particularly good story with which to entice reluctant boys.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback