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Fanshaw: African Sanctus; Salaams

Fanshaw: African Sanctus; Salaams

20 Feb 2014

£8.49 (VAT included if applicable)
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3:06
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2:45
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3:45
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6:20
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3:13
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13
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 21 Jun 1989
  • Release Date: 21 Jun 1989
  • Label: Decca Music Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 1989 Universal International Music B.V.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:15:47
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003UP82D4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 82,955 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Budge Burgess on 3 Aug 2005
Format: Audio CD
First performed in 1972, known then as 'African Revelations', the 'African Sanctus' was first released in recorded form by Philips in 1975 (a revised version appeared in 1994, incorporating the 'Donna Nobis Pacem').
David Fanshawe (b.1942, Devon), is a widely travelled and widely experienced documentary film maker, sound recordist, and composer. He saw in 'African Sanctus' a true fusion of European and African musical traditions and cultures, the work combining the traditional Latin Mass with carefully juxtaposed sounds from the North of Africa.
The opening is wholly unselfconscious - a pounding "Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus" which would not be out of place in a horror movie. It thrusts the music before you and insists that you listen. What Fanshawe then delivers is a sonic montage, layering recordings of North West African tribal and urban music over the undercurrent of the Latin Mass. The Sanctus will be followed by a muezzin calling the faithful to prayer in Cairo, by wedding music from Luxor, the mass being echoed by requiem, celebration, love song, lament, even the sounds of rainfall, blending human voices, natural rhythms, and different cultural traditions.
It's a direct marriage of Christian and Islamic tradition, but one which blends in references to religions and spiritual traditions which are far older than either. It's an exciting serving of music which pulsates with life and optimism.
In the revised edition of the work - and the recording I would advocate that you look for - Fanshawe would include the Donna Nobis Pacem ("give us peace") or 'Hymn for World Peace', a sentiment no less vital today.
Frequently performed in concert halls across the world, the live 'African Sanctus' often embodies a further dimension of cultural experience by introducing dance.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Millum on 9 Nov 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is unlike any other recording I have heard - and a very good re-creation of the live performance. Even if you don't like religious music, this will still thrill and excite. The mixture of 'traditional' choir with modern instruments and the weird and wonderful recordings from Africa is still innovative, challenging and wonderfully affirmative.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bacchus TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 Mar 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am reviewing the African Sanctus (must get round to Salaams at some point) having taken part in a performance of the work and having listened to this recording a number of times to enable me to learn how it goes.

The African Sanctus is a work that I have known of for many years but have only recently taken the time to get to know it. I did listen to the setting of the Lord's Prayer abou 20 years ago, which I confess that I found a bit twee. I have always been a bit confused as to where David Fanshawe fits into the tradition of 20th Century English music. The Lord's Prayer itself was itself subject to a ban by the BBC who did not consider it, with its accompaniment of electric guitars and drums and 'poppy' melodic style, to be a classical piece at all.

The work is a strange mixture of conventional (albeit very challenging) English choral writing and recordings of Ethnic African music from Egypt, Uganda and Sudan. Although I found the juxtaposition fascinating and the experience of performing the work immensely exhilerating, I am still unclear as to its artistic significance.

Anyway, if you wish to listen to this work, you could do a lot worse than listen to this recording. The choir on this recording, the professional Ambrosian Singers, is brilliant at singing the choral bits. The accuracy and quality of tone is quite breathtaking. There are two soprano soloists, Valerie Hill, who sings the Lord's Prayer (which I now find rather moving) and Patricia Clarke, who sings some fiendishly difficult operatic solos with amazing musicality and ease. The whole thing is presided over by Owain Arwel Hughes, who was a fellow student with David Fanshawe at the Royal College of Music.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pat Smith on 29 Aug 2010
Format: Audio CD
The ingenious blending of amazing and exciting African music from all corners of that continent with a vibrant performance from a European choir and orachestra makes for "sit up and listen" sounds. The working of music into this religious theme is compelling and imaginative.
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