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Fangirl Audio CD – 0100


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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Listening Library (Audio) (0100)
  • ASIN: B00FK8VS62
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (216 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Rainbow Rowell writes books. Sometimes she writes about adults (ATTACHMENTS and LANDLINE). Sometimes she writes about teenagers (ELEANOR & PARK and FANGIRL). But she always writes about people who talk a lot. And people who feel like they're screwing up. And people who fall in love.

When she's not writing, Rainbow is reading comic books, planning Disney World trips and arguing about things that don't really matter in the big scheme of things.

She lives in Nebraska with her husband and two sons.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Rosie Read on 13 Oct. 2013
Format: Hardcover
As someone who didn't necessarily love college at the beginning I really connected with Cath and her uneasy, introverted nature. However, Fangirl's strength is that there is a whole host of characters that really will cover the majority of the spectrum of potential readers. Cath's university experience is juxtaposed with that of happy-go-lucky Levi; the brutally honest and confident Reagan; and Wren, her sister, who doesn't find herself at college but rather loses herself in the experience.

In Cath's proverbial jump from little to big pond she has to navigate that terrifying moment of embarking on new friendships, filtering out those who are only there for themselves along the way, as well as learning how to leave her home behind while still managing to be there for her family. While adept online Cath also struggles to find her voice in her new classes, a universal theme we all encounter when we take that little step up.

The relationships that Cath builds in the novel, both platonic and romantic, are slow to blossom and all the more realistic for being so. None of the relationships hit you over the head and sometimes you do find yourself questioning where they are going, like real life relationships. As in Eleanor & Park I think that Rowell's strength lies in her honest portrayal of young, vulnerable relationships.

As with Rowell's previous novels her writing is really what makes Fangirl excel as a truly captivating novel. The simplicity of her language and the effortless feel of the dialogue make Fangirl a fun, fluid, and unaffected read that will keep you engaged until the end.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Molly Gibson-Mee on 14 July 2014
Format: Paperback
Review also available on my blog:[...]
Hey guys!

I know I’m a bit late to jump on the Fangirl bandwagon. With everybody raving about it I went into this book with very high expectations. Even with the odds against it, in my view, I did enjoy Fangirl. However, although the book was good, I did find it lacking some things.

I’ll start with the negatives. At the end of each chapter there was an extract from either the Simon Snow books (the fictional books which the protagonist, Cath, fangirls over) or from Cath’s fanfiction of these books. When I first heard about extracts being used in a review I read before the book, I was really excited and interested in how Rowell would utilise them. The problem, for me, is that the extracts, particularly from the Simon Snow books, seemed completely irrelevant to the book. I mean, once you’ve grasped that Simon Snow is meant to be Harry Potter you don’t really care about tiny, irrelevant extracts from it. Cath’s fanfiction, although more relevant as it gives the reader an insight into how her mind works, does seem detached from the main story. It would have been better if, say, the Simon Snow extracts gave some message that reflected the previous chapter, or how Cath felt. Or if the extracts were from Cath’s updates of her main fic Carry On, Simon and we could see how her fic developed as she developed. Even the extracts from fics written years before this book is set could have been used to contrast how Cath writes alone and how she writes with Wren. But none of this happened in any of the extracts and I had to force myself to read them at the end of each chapter, hoping they became relevant. I asked my sister about it and she said that when she read Fangirl she just skipped over the extracts.
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Format: Paperback
First of all, I want to be clear about the fact that I really enjoyed this book and read it in just one sitting. It was well-written (as you'd obviously expect from any published novel but sadly I have read so many poorly written books lately that 'well-written' is a slight surprise!), the plot was mostly interesting, intriguing, and likeable, as were most of the characters most of the time. I especially liked Cath's roommate (I can't remember her name) and her eventual love interest (forgotten his name too!). However, there are many reasons I cannot give it more than three stars.

1) I found Cath really quite irritating. Finding a character doesn't have to be a negative thing about the book, but at times I found Cath's negativity really annoying. There's this one point where a fellow new, and likely equally shy and lonely female student smiles and seems eager to start a conversation and Cath just blanks her. Cath, who is too shy to find out where the cafeteria is, Cath who moans about being alone. It just seemed really stupid and unrealistic to me, if we're going along with the idea we're forced to have throughout that Cath is just shy and too used to living in her twin sister's shadow, then it seems absurd that Cath would push people away like this. I am a very shy person, yet when I first started at university I made a point to smile, start conversations, and invite and include others along to things I wanted to do or places I wanted to go. It's just something you have to do, and it's something that I found most did. Unrealistic.
Cath did grow as a character later on, but those initial parts were just painful.
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