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Fando and Lis [DVD] [US Import] [NTSC]

Tamara Garina , Sergio Kleiner , Alejandro Jodorowsky    DVD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: £94.95
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Product details

  • Actors: Tamara Garina, Sergio Kleiner, Diana Mariscal, María Teresa Rivas, Juan José Arreola
  • Directors: Alejandro Jodorowsky
  • Writers: Alejandro Jodorowsky, Fernando Arrabal
  • Producers: Juan López Moctezuma, Moshe Rosemberg, Roberto Viskin, Samuel Rosemberg
  • Format: Black & White, Colour, Letterboxed, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: NR (Not Rated) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Image Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 3 April 2001
  • Run Time: 93 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005B642
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 274,302 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
Format:DVD
a must see film for all fans of cult director Alejandro Jodorowsky - notorious film maker behind cult releases: The Holy Mountain,Santa Sengre + El Topo.
Fando y Lis from 1968, mexican produced, surreal, shocking,disturbing, overlong, extraordinary collection of surreal images, mixes allegories,transvestites, allusions to infant molestation, pregnant women,flaming pianos, cripples,old grannies seducing young men,via the love/hate relationship of Fando and Lis his long suffering partner in a startling film that first launched Jodorowsky's film career form mexico, caused a riot , receiving death threats form outraged cinema go-ers + for good reason.

if you are easily offended - avoid. if yr not + have a avid open minded curiousity for avant garde cinema that seemingly questions ALL societies norms - then but,rent or watch trailers on YouTube. my own TheSmack77 channel features two edited trailers also. a sometimes shocking (i've omitted a description here of some of the more outre moments in the film) BUT a must see. Dali meets George A.Romero meets Marilyn Manson/David Lynch. get the idea ?

recommended for all visual obsessives, cinema junkies + fans of the cult surrealism / exploitation genre. try also the Tartan Films multi dvd box set that also includes "Fando Y Lis" amongst the other films already mentioned. its available to hire on LoveFilm also as a great inexpensive (to hire)introduction to this remarkable film maker.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Baffling but fascinating 1 Feb 2009
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
One of the strangest and, in its time, controversial films ever
made. It does make some sort of sense when you play it with the director's commentary, but I defer anyone to come up with his meaning without hearing it! Personally, I find some of his symbolism to be a bit literal and even naive.
There are some disturbing scenes, but none of the explicit animal slaughter of some of Jodorovsky's other films. It's a million miles away from Hollywood.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  33 reviews
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Whimsical and spooky 14 Jun 2004
By Jeffrey Leach - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Ever since I first heard about Alejandro Jodorowsky's "El Topo," I wanted to see it. Supposedly on the surface a spaghetti western, but so much more underneath, the movie sounded delightfully bizarre in a way I often enjoy. Well, I have not gotten a chance to see this movie yet since it has not come out on DVD. When I saw the opportunity to watch "Fando and Lis," an earlier film from the same director, I grabbed the chance figuring that something was better than nothing. I was wrong. While "Fando and Lis" does contain some interesting scenes, this Jodorowsky picture dwells deep in the land of surrealism. Nonsensical films do not usually bother me as long as there is some sort of touchstone to hang your hat on. A director can take his project completely over the top as long as a plot exists somewhere under the madness. This is the central problem of "Fando and Lis." The film, a totally improvised production based on memory and a one-page synopsis of a play written by Francisco Arrabal, never makes a bit of sense. It's theater of the absurd time here, folks, so prepare for the ultimate in weirdness. Fortunately, the disc also contains "Constellation Jodorowsky," a documentary about the filmmaker and artist that follows a more traditional approach to storytelling.
"Fando and Lis" tells the story of, predictably, Fando (Sergio Kleiner) and his main squeeze Lis (Diana Mariscal) in glorious black and white photography. The two live in a post-apocalyptic world, in an environment of desert climes and shattered cities. Earth as we know it is gone, so Fando and Lis begin a quest for the mythical city of Tar, a city that seems to promise hope and regeneration for the weary couple. The only possessions they have appear to be a drum, a phonograph, and a wooden cart in which Lis serenely rides. She cannot walk, for some reason, so her man pushes her around wherever they go. The two are a temperamental pair, with Fando often tiring of dealing with Lis's constant complaints. All of this information is the only thing we know for sure about the movie. You see, "Fando and Lis" soon embarks on a bizarre odyssey of disjointed scenes, sparse scenery, and downright odd secondary characters. Never before has such an incoherent movie found its way to my DVD player. And you thought Luis Bunuel or Salvador Dali were weird. Until you check out Jodorowsky, you ain't seen nothing yet. This movie would give Sigmund Freud a nervous breakdown.
I can offer no ample explanations for the unfolding silliness. Scenes and situations include a piano on fire collapsing and then reconstituting itself only to collapse again, a bunch of people rolling about in the mud while a religious figure cackles madly in the background, and a bunch of old ladies sitting around a table eating something that looks like eggs while a guy in a diaper lurches around in the background. You get more, such as a blindfolded Fando led around by women, a scene in which some strange guy drains blood from Lis's arm into a wine glass, and a funeral scene where Fando's mother lies down in her grave. Are you still here? Good, because I have not described my favorite scene yet. It's just as unfathomable as any other situation in the film, but it's so ridiculous that it bears mentioning. At one point, Fando stumbles over a bunch of Amazonian type women who chase him around a craggy hill while knocking him down with bowling balls. Yep, you heard right-bowling balls. Just when Fando thinks he has escaped these wacky women, another bowling ball comes crashing down a hill and fells our hero like he's a pin. Jodorowsky missed out on really giving the scene meaning by failing to shod these gals with bowling shoes. As for the music score, you have to listen to it yourself to believe how peculiar it is.
What could this madness possibly imply? Good luck figuring it all out. As far as I can tell, the film means whatever you want it to mean. I would not worry too much about extracting a coherent theme from "Fando and Lis" unless you want to end up in a rubber room for a few years. What really threw me for a loop was how much I enjoyed specific parts of the movie. I usually despise films this whimsical, but Jodorowsky's vision occasionally possessed a certain charm that made the whole thing worthwhile. That scene with the paint was interesting, as was the couple posing over tombstones. Yet, I would never attempt to recommend the movie to anyone else. It's way too abnormal for you to take my word that you should possibly watch the picture. You have to decide yourself whether to dive in to Jodorowsky's film
"Constellation Jodorowsky" is a bit easier on the eyes and ears. The documentary runs nearly as long as "Fando and Lis." Consisting of lengthy interviews with the director about such diverse subjects as life, philosophy, and theology, "Constellation" shows us what the filmmaker does with his time nowadays. Apparently, he teaches some course at a university where he tosses off lots of new age aphorisms to a docile audience. These scenes run far too long and take away from the more interesting segments, namely the discussion about Frank Herbert's "Dune." Incredibly, Jodorowsky nearly directed the film adaptation of the book, going so far as to hire an artist to draw storyboards. His plans for "Dune" looked fabulous; it's too bad the project went to David Lynch. Only purveyors of atypical cinema should check out this disc. For me, I am still waiting for "El Topo" to come out on DVD.
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jodorowsky's Lost Film Recovered 22 Jan 2000
By Steve Mobia - Published on Amazon.com
Fans of the hyperbolic director Alejandro Jodorowsky ("El Topo") should love this episodic psychodrama loosely based on an absurdist play by Fernando Arrabal. Though obviously a first feature with uneven pacing and often washed out over-exposed scenes, the film makes up for its deficits with an abundance of surprising images. Set in a devastated appocalyptic landscape, we follow a young sadomasochistic couple on their desperate search for a magical city named "Tar." The girl, Lis, is paralyzed and must be pushed around on a rickety cart by Fando. As in "El Topo" a parade of emblematic characters appear out of nowhere to taunt and teach them. Many of these scenes have a wierd sense of humor as when bowling balls are used as weapons, or Fando's mother force feeds him hard boiled eggs. Some of these visions appear more fully formed in Jodorowsky's later films as when a live bird is pulled from the chest of Fando's father. It is difficult to watch the misogynist brutal torture of Lis which intensifies toward the end of the film, but Jodorowsky's intention is never to make the viewer comfortable. Like the mute girl in "Sante Sangre," Lis portrays a certain male fantasy of the pure woman as one who accepts torment with acceptance and forgiveness. The film was shot by Raphael Cokidi who went on to shoot Jodorowsky's next two works and to direct allegorical films himself. The feature length documentory "Jodorowsky Constellation" is an added bonus and portrays the director's current life in France. There are some nice excerpts from "El Topo" and "The Holy Mountain" but curiously none from the later "Sante Sangre." Also interviewed are Marcel Marceau, Fernando Arrabal and Peter Gabriel though they are not indentified by subtitles. Unfortunately the long "therapy" session at the end lessens the impact of this otherwise competent profile. The package is well put together and includes a picture brochure from the orginal showing of "Fando and Lis."
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A superb DVD transfer of Jodorowsky's first feature film 11 Mar 2000
By Wayne - Published on Amazon.com
This is the first feature film from Chilean avant-garde filmmaker Alexandro Jodorowsky, which caused riots on its premiere in Acapulco in 1968. It's a strange tale of a man and woman, who wander around a barren landscape searching for the mystical city of Tar. And also to seek enlightenment from an assortment of strange characters. It's not for everyone, but if you like your movies out there in the extremes of surrealism and symbolism, this one is for you. The DVD also includes a interesting documentary where Jodorowsky is interviewed, and we learn of his philosophy and opinions, which are always fascinating. A must own DVD for fans of avant-garde cinema.
18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Lost Film from Director of EL TOPO 14 Oct 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Considered lost for nearly 30 years, FANDO & LIS had its premiere at the 1968 Acapulco Film festival. What should have marked the arrival of a new master of the surreal instead degenerated into a full-scale riot on the festival floor. The director barely escaped with his life and the festival was closed.
FANDO & LIS is first film from Alejandro Jodorowsky, the creator of such cult classics as EL TOPO, HOLY MOUNTAIN, and SANTA SANGRE. It is the story of two young lovers search for a mythic city called Tar. Very surreal and very fun!
Fantoma has done an excellent job of bringing this film to DVD. The transfer from the recently rediscovered original negative is wonderful and there are lots of cool extras like CONSTELLATION JODOROWSKY (a feature-length documentary on the director), audio commentary by Jodorowsky, and a reproduction of the 8-page handbill given out at the film's premiere in addition to the regular DVD booklet.
If you appreciate the unusual, this film is for you.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a fascinating work and beautifully assembled dvd 30 Jun 2001
By Charles Read - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
I bought this having been impressed by watching both 'El Topo' and 'Holy Mountain' a while ago (both unavailible in US; more information is at ...) and although lower budget this holds up very well to these later works. The transfer is very good, especially considering it was thought lost for so long; although there are several instances of print damage. The real highlight of this disc, however, are the numerous extras. The complete documentary 'Constellation Jodorowsky' runs at over an hour and is a very interesting insight into his career as a whole (not just his film making). Jodorowsky's commentary is at times disjoint, and his accent makes him difficult to understand (although subtitles are availible) but he comes across extremely well as every bit the eccentric, offbeat character one would expect; as well as sharing many facts about the production and the film's troubled past. The inclusion of the original 8-page handbill was a welcome addition for any collector. Now, here's hoping one day someone will get around the legal complications and give 'El Topo' and 'Holy Mountain' the same kind of treatment!
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