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Falling Eagle: The Decline Of Barclays Bank Hardcover – 28 Feb 2000

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; First Edition edition (28 Feb. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0297644068
  • ISBN-13: 978-0297644064
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 674,208 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Amazon Review

Many people have, at best, a love-hate relationship with their bank. Unless you simply stuff your cash under the mattress, you need one--but the service you receive may seem too little and the charges too high. That said, do you want to read about one? A book about Barclays may not seem immediately appealing; one subtitled "The Decline of Barclays Bank" is perhaps a little more interesting; one by an author with inside knowledge and a P45 to show for it is better still.

Falling Eagle is part history, part exposé. It tracks the bank from its 19th-century origins to the present day, liberally peppering the narrative with revealing anecdotes. It dissects the organization and its hierarchical structure, charts the bank's successes (it was the first to install cash dispensers and move away from the traditional bank layout to something more like a high street shop) and chronicles its troubles, of which there have been many over the years (for example with the ill-fated BZW, Barclay's investment division).

Perhaps a little self-indulgence creeps into the writing as the troubles are unfolded--the author gives the impression of feeling he is well out of it--but the net effect makes an enthralling story. Well-researched, well-written and entertainingly presented, Falling Eagle is a title that deserves much wider readership than the average corporate biography. --Patrick Forsyth

Book Description

The gripping inside story of how Barclays ¿ once Britain¿s leading bank ¿ was brought to its knees.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By antonyhunter@compuserve.com on 11 Mar. 2000
Format: Hardcover
You would expect a well written book from a journalist of Martin Vander Weyer's reputation and well written is a fair description. But it's much more than that. Falling Eagle is well researched and highly amusing in it's description of the activities of so many Barclays people over the years. A must for Barclays insiders,Barclays watchers and students of the faults of large companies.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. V. J. Gardner on 4 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
I found this to be an easy reading book with considerable in-depth detail about the bank, the staff, and some of its constituent banks. Very interesting, and light hearted in many places. Lots of information in here which is missing from other 'Barclays' books.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Oct. 2000
Format: Hardcover
Martin Vander Weyer draws on his experiences and those of his father to produce a frequently-amusing book charting the idiosyncrasies and foibles of the famous high street bank from its inception to the high profile collapse of its investment banking division.
Barclays as an institution has survived for centuries and with each successive generation the traditions and culture of the bank have become further engrained its charges. Weyer's book provides some insight into Barclay's recent troubles by not only highlighting the failings of those present at the time but also the very culture that made the situation possible. Along the way he provides amusing anecdotes of his own experiences in many of Barclays far-flung reaches which serve to illustrate many of the failings of the bank including internal conflicts, lack of audit and control, irresponsible lending and ultimate failure to capitalise on the Barclays's name in the investment bank arena.
A well structured and interesting book which succeeds in its goal to provide insight to the ubiquitous bank whilst not pandering to the bank or excluding Barclay's outsiders.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sally Burdyke on 7 July 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I must confess, I don't know whether some yarn is being spun here - or whether it's true or not - I haven't read through all the book, as I don't know whether I'm being 'had' or not.

According to Wikipedia the Barclay brothers who are now shored up on some island somewhere started the bank from working their way up through newsagents and painting and decorating etc.
Another article on Wikipedia mentions that the bank and the name 'Barclays' has been going on for some time. This book accords with the latter view, and tells about how John Freame and his descendants and colleagues were involved with the Tukes (Rowntrees, Terrys - oligopolies and all the rest of it. There is a character in this book called Mr Goodenough. (Sounds like a Dickensian name?) There is even a pun where he tells someone they are 'not good enough'. The book tells of a Quaker heritage. It says that the modern vision of Barclays began with the sexual revolution in 1966 - which coincides, spparently, with the introduction of the Barclaycard.

I went to a play in York last night which had something to do with Robin Hood and the Sheriff of Nottingham. Whatever else the play was about its main theme seemed to be to try and suggest that 'They' definitely do exist. What they are up to exactly, I don't really know. There seems to be a multiplicity of signs.

Undeniably, however, the weather - or whether - is certainly a danger.
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