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Fall Be Kind [EP]

Animal Collective Audio CD
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 5.11
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Biography

Merriweather Post Pavilion is the ninth studio album from Animal Collective, recorded with Ben Allen in Oxford, Mississippi. After listening to this record, however, it's clear that Animal Collective have transcended the everyday realities of numbers, locations and people and arrived at a spectacular, unique place. Animal Collective have made a universal record that makes the same ... Read more in Amazon's Animal Collective Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Fall Be Kind + Feels + Centipede Hz
Price For All Three: 20.05

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  • Centipede Hz 6.95

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Product details

  • Audio CD (15 Dec 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: EP
  • Label: Domino
  • ASIN: B002RD4UZY
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 540,577 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

BBC Review

The final release of a year that’s been Animal Collective’s most successful yet, with their Merriweather Post Pavilion album a bona-fide critical hit, Fall Be Kind presents five new tracks that should further the band’s steady infiltration of the mainstream.

While obviously the work of the same men who shaped Merriweather into such a brilliantly boisterous, bamboozling and beautiful collection of future-pop anthems, this is a standalone affair that requires recognition based on its own merits. Focusing on Animal Collective’s more ethereal soundscapes – closer to the underarm-tickle of Taste than the blitzkrieg bop of Brother Sport – Fall Be Kind is a disc to slip into, gently. If you’re yet to be moved by this act’s work, don’t expect this to prove an effective point of entry.

Those who’ve followed the fortunes of the now New York-based Collective for some time, at least since their switch to Domino for 2007’s superb Strawberry Jam, will take this EP to heart immediately. Graze – which incorporates elements of Romanian pan-piper Gheorghe Zamfir’s Ardeleana – opens with a languid liquidity; a staple of the band’s recent live sets, the song’s one that compromises deep impact for the slightest impression. But the mark remains nonetheless, and is given greater detail once the track strikes its chattering, kaleidoscopic second half – gypsy vibes meets Brooklyn cool.

What Would I Want? Sky is the first song to feature an officially cleared sample of a Grateful Dead track, in this instance Unbroken Chain from 1974’s …from the Mars Hotel LP. Not that Animal Collective have turned magpie to make up for a dearth of independent ideas, as the piece is still very much their own. If you knew no better, no connection between eclectic rock’s past and its forward-thinking present would be apparent.

The trio – a quartet until Merriweather’s recording (stray member Deakin is on a sabbatical) – entrance the faithful throughout the following three offerings: Bleed touches upon the delightful ambience of Panda Bear’s 2007 solo venture, Person Pitch, with its repetition-as-lullaby structure; the soaring vocals of On a Highway are tethered by a percussively playful backing that never shifts from a rightly contented second gear; and I Think I Can closes proceedings with alien chirrups giving way to earthbound instrumental birdsong, a midnight saunter through a balmy sonic jungle.

All told, this is every bit as spellbinding as anticipated. Roll on further adventures. --Mike Diver

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Customer Reviews

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4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
'Merriweather Post Pavillion' was released to much (deserved) fanfare earlier this year. The hype surrounding the record was so intense that it sometimes seemed like a struggle to see the forest through the trees. It brought the Animal Collective many new listeners who maybe took a while to warm to the record, but to long-standing fans such as myself, it was the truly beautiful moment when AC finally released their masterpeice and cemented their place in American culture.

So now we are 10 months later and to a much more restrained release, the collective dispatch with their latest EP. This should be considerd as a companion peice to MMP in much the same way that 'Water Curses' was to 'Strawberry Jam' in 2007. The EP opens with what is quite possibly the most beautiful 6 minutes of music this wonderful band have thus far commited to tape. Entitled 'Graze' it starts with a bunch of swirling strings and cellos, eventually comes the commanding voice of Dave Portner(Avey Tare) as he sings of 'letting the light in', 2 minutes in he is joined by Noah Lennox(Panda Bear) who is singing the most beautiful coda (it really does need to be heard), and finally the song collapses in on itself with drums and flutes competeing for supremecy. Follow-up track 'What Would I Want? Sky' will probably be the most talked about track on the disc, as it uses a sample of the Grateful Deads 'Unbroken Chain'. The use of the sample is inspired, as it swirls around the entire 7 minutes with Lennox and Portner joining at seemingly un-scripted intervals.

The opening 13 minutes of this EP are truly the work of a group at the height of inventivness and really on top of their game.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars amazing record 17 May 2011
Format:Vinyl
FALL BE KIND is simply amazing record. I've been A.C. fan for a while and I even went on a gig. When this record came out I didn't get it at all, and I didn't pay atention to it. Then one day I decided to buy FALL BE KIND LP among other music I bought on amazon.
I usually listen LP's before I went to sleep, such as MILES DAVIS, PAT METHENY and others. I take this time to re-think the day, or think about future . But when I listen FALL BE KIND, I forget all the stuff on my mind and focus on music. This record has that kind of pover and energy to took you places where you haven't been before, and that is amazing!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Call me lucky 16 May 2010
By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
It's been a pretty wild year for the Animal Collective, introducing a new sound and a new album of experimental pop music. As a finishing touch to their latest efforts, they also turned out a new EP -- "Fall Be Kind" is a cascade of weird, wild and alluring musical journeys, but the second half is a bit of on the monotonous side. Not bad exactly, but not as intense as they're capable of being.

It starts off on a light note with "Graze," a silvery little melody that trembles and shimmers over the piano and guitar. At first it sounds like birds flying over a sylvan glade, only to slowly shift into a joyous, slightly loopy dance melody strung through with flutes. Or maybe it's panpipes. You can almost see the frolicking nymphs when you hear it.

"Why Would I Want Sky?" shifts into a darker sound, almost industrial at times. There's a stretch of blurred voices overlaid with weird noises and slow-moving riffs... which dissolves into a mournful, softer dirge, and finally shifts upward again with the sound of shimmering strings, and the repeated question, "What would I want sky? What would I want sky?"

These two songs are undoubtedly the high point of the entire album -- they're atmospheric without being heavy, and have plenty of weird eerie instrumentation that floats the listener away on a cloud. And while the first is a light, airy affair, it also segues into a darker and more contemplative melody -- it has the right mix of ambient eeriness and soaring pop melodies. No complaints here.

The problem is that after that, the next three songs sort of blur together, as if they're one big song split into three -- I wouldn't have minded "Bleeding," "On a Highway" and "I Think I Can" as one vast experimental song.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spellbinding stuff 17 Dec 2009
Format:Audio CD
2009 has been Animal Collective's most successful year to date, with Merriweather Post Pavilion launching them into the limelight many fans felt they've deserved for a long time, but not necessarily wanted. And they certainly can't be accused of selling out, the only way their music seems to develop is in more experimental ways, with no sights set on selling records. Whatever their outlook, the songs they present to us continue to be exciting and diverse, with this new EP as a perfect example.

Opener `Graze' starts off as an enticing and gentle song, with lines like "Let me begin" and "Some ideas are brewing". This lasts until a surprising mid point, when the gentle strings are swapped for a manic pan pipe loop, and speedier vocals. `What Would I Want? Sky' is just as successful, and remains my favourite from the EP. By beautifully sampling a Grateful Dead lyric, "Willow sky, whoa, I walk and wonder why", and cleverly re-looping it, Animal Collective generate a whole new interpretation, so that the listener hears the title of the track. Genius.
`Bleed' follows, sounding much more like Collective's pre-MPP work. Final tracks `On A Highway' (an ode to life on tour), and seven-minute long `I Think I Can' complete an EP with a spellbinding and relaxing feel.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  15 reviews
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let Me Begin... 24 Nov 2009
By Tony H - Published on Amazon.com
Animal collective have struck gold again. Not only are the three leftover tracks from MPP great (Graze, I Think I Can, and On A Highway), but the entire EP is a brilliant and a wonderfully new style for the band, who have put out their best EP to date. With its run time of twenty seven minutes, Fall Be Kind has almost enough substance and style to be called an album of its own. The dark, cold, and vibrant textures are brilliantly contrasted with Animal Collective's ability to bring out their inner-jam. As accessible as their music has become, they've lost only a very small amount of psychedelia along the way; and this is coming from someone who thinks Here Comes The Indian is just as good as Merriweather Post Pavilion.

Graze (10/10): The beginning two minutes and a half of the song is a light, ambient vocal showcase which starts with Avey Tare backed with a beautiful violin and is followed by a nice solo from Panda Bear, both backed by hardly a rhythm but more of a texture. It's all really a perfect build up for the second half when it all fuzzes out until BAM! the most kickin' flute solo most will have ever heard. Then the avey and panda duo kicks in with: "Comfort, comfort,/ why do you run for it?/ why can't you keep doin/ what you're supposed to do? / Why can't i reach you/ when i most need you? / you're at the beach and/ i'm in some strange bed." And the rhythm takes you in while you find yourself nodding your head to the beat.

What would i want? Sky (10/10): Again showing the band's flawless method of blending two different jams into one great song. The first three minutes is just pure jam-tripping with Avey's mysterious "good genes?" looping in the background with crashing cymbols until the trip slows down, but quickly you find yourself venturing new territory before "Sky, What would i want? Sky," the notorious first legal Grateful Dead Sample, followed by some nice booming bass, and the jam begins. Though Avey's voice sounds a little production-y here, it all works nicely.

Bleed (8/10): A perfect middle-song. The darker side Avey spoke of in interviews is clearly present here. Mostly texture, juxtaposing Avey's slow droning-voice style with Panda bear's almost echo-y, smooth backdrop. It's short, sweet, and dark, and a perfect transition between the two halves of the EP.

On A Highway (9/10): A perfect opportunity to ride on the highway with David Portner (Avey Tare). The slow, ambient, highway-like sounds work perfectly behind Avey's inner thoughts as he rides down the highway, smoking hash, looking out the window, and just thinking about how although he should feel lucky for all the places he gets to go, he really just can't wait to be home.

I Think I Can (9/10): Perfect example of the band's fearlessness and progression; the song explores new styles while becoming one of their most intense songs to date, featuring a nice ensemble of layering vocals via Panda and Avey. The fire is eventually put out, though, when the song shifts tones quickly in the form of a dazzling Beach Boys-type vocal performance by Panda Bear followed by a repeated "I think I can I think I can I think I..." This one you will just have to hear for yourself.

I have to admit, though, my review is biased because I'm a huge fan. (and no i'm not a hipster, just a regular dude)
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Call me lucky 17 Dec 2009
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It's been a pretty wild year for the Animal Collective, introducing a new sound and a new album of experimental pop music. As a finishing touch to their latest efforts, they also turned out a new EP -- "Fall Be Kind" is a cascade of weird, wild and alluring musical journeys, but the second half is a bit of on the monotonous side. Not bad exactly, but not as intense as they're capable of being.

It starts off on a light note with "Graze," a silvery little melody that trembles and shimmers over the piano and guitar. At first it sounds like birds flying over a sylvan glade, only to slowly shift into a joyous, slightly loopy dance melody strung through with flutes. Or maybe it's panpipes. You can almost see the frolicking nymphs when you hear it.

"Why Would I Want Sky?" shifts into a darker sound, almost industrial at times. There's a stretch of blurred voices overlaid with weird noises and slow-moving riffs... which dissolves into a mournful, softer dirge, and finally shifts upward again with the sound of shimmering strings, and the repeated question, "What would I want sky? What would I want sky?"

These two songs are undoubtedly the high point of the entire album -- they're atmospheric without being heavy, and have plenty of weird eerie instrumentation that floats the listener away on a cloud. And while the first is a light, airy affair, it also segues into a darker and more contemplative melody -- it has the right mix of ambient eeriness and soaring pop melodies. No complaints here.

The problem is that after that, the next three songs sort of blur together, as if they're one big song split into three -- I wouldn't have minded "Bleeding," "On a Highway" and "I Think I Can" as one vast experimental song. But they all have much the same feel, relying on a grey ambient sound with lots of blurry echoing vocals and sharp percussions. None of them are actually bad, but sandwiched together they feel... very repetitive. I kept waiting for something new, and it never came.

One thing that cannot be faulted is Animal Collective's instrumental prowess -- they create dense swathes of beautifully atmospheric music, no matter what the mood. Instead they layer on heavy depths of synth, and twine it together with piano, a shimmering violin melody, slow-grinding basslines, a dancing flute melody, heavy spurts of guitar, and all sorts of percussion (from clattering drumsticks to clapping hands and stomping feet). Oh yes, and one of the songs actually has a licensed Grateful Dead sample... the first ever, apparently.

And Avey Tare's vocals almost serve as another instrument -- half the time I can't understand what the man is saying, but his shifting echoing voice slips through the music like a carp through murky water. And when you can hear him, he sounds incredibly earnest when he sings nonsensical-sounding phrases like "What would I want sky?" or "And I don't want/To keep myself/From good..."

"Fall Be Kind" opens with a brilliant duo of experimental pop songs, but slips into repetition in its second half. If that part had been spiced up, this would have been a spectacular EP.
5.0 out of 5 stars This is Animal Collective in Their Absolute Prime 19 Nov 2013
By Jeff - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Coming off Merriweather Post Pavilion, I had high hopes for their inevitable follow-up EP, and somehow they still lived up to the hype. "Graze" is such a weird and compelling track (and the pan flute is awesome!). "What Would I Want? Sky" is as good as anything they've ever done. I wouldn't say this is the best starting point for listeners new to AC, but anyone who is a fan of the band will cherish this outing.
5.0 out of 5 stars Fall Be Kind, Fall Be Beautiful 8 April 2013
By Nick Habisch - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Vinyl
After Animal Collective's much lauded Merriwether Post Pavilion was released to all its fanfare, it was a wonder what direction the band would take. Would we see a return to the more (pardon my pun) animalistic nature of Here Comes The Indian, the lush sounds of Feels, or would the listener be taken even further down the path of psychedelic pop music? With Fall Be Kind, the band hit on all three of these aspects and much more. "Graze" opens up as a serene, laid back song, with Avey Tare's vocals drowned in effects and reverb. Sounding like a more floating version of Merriwether's "Bluish", "Graze" suddenly turns a one-eighty, and a flute sample opens the listener up to Animal Collective's weird world that is Fall Be Kind.

Yet for the dichotomy "Graze" presents, this EP decides to stay in one place, in that moody, dreary world where clouds cover the sun, and the raindrops fall slightly on the windowpane. "What Would I Want Sky?", with its first ever licensed Grateful Dead sample, continues where the beginning of "Graze" left off: slow pads and atmosphere, and the vocals of Avey Tare and Panda Bear being drenched in reverb and effects to create a heavy mood. Although the ending melodies come off as a tad more upbeat, this song tends to feed the darkness that pervades this EP.

Now this is not to sound like Fall Be Kind is a bad record, to the contrary, it is beautiful, if a bit moody. The textures and vocals are airy and slick, the melodies prevalent, and the percussion limited, but hard-hitting when it appears. "Bleed" is the track that perfectly pictures the mood and tone of the EP, with heavy droning noises among the vocal calls, a track that is trance inducing in its simplicity and beauty.

Panda Bear's "I Think I Can" holds place at the tail end of the EP, and like most Panda Bear written songs, leaves us on a slightly positive note. The music is more upbeat, and it can be seen as the sunlight beginning to peak through the clouds, with the rousing ending of "I Think I Can" providing a nice end-note to Animal Collective's melancholy record.

Fall Be Kind is nothing short of gorgeous. Although it can suffer from feeling a bit too morose at times, it easily eclipses Merriwether in the Animal Collective catalog, and makes a strong case for being the best EP, if not the best work they have constructed. A highly recommended listen.
4.0 out of 5 stars Great album! 21 Jan 2011
By S - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Vinyl|Verified Purchase
Some of the better AC songs, and the vinyl edition is a fantastic way to listen. The price is right, and the tracks are memorable and moving.
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