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Fairytale
 
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Fairytale

5 April 2010 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
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2:44
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3:37
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2:54
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2:06
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1:49
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2:54
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4:38
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2:11
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3:09
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 5 April 2010
  • Release Date: 5 April 2010
  • Label: Sanctuary Records Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 2001 Sanctuary Records Group Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:45
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003GQ04GK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 43,980 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Nov. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This 1965 album, recorded for Pye, was the second of Donovan's career, and the second he released in that year. It finds Donovan in a pensive, reflective mood but edging towards the slightly psychedelic style he would later be noted for. Clearly influenced by Bob Dylan, it contains a share of songs that aim at social commentary in a simple guitar/singer/songwriter folk style, along with a few simple love songs and some rather interesting ballads. The opening track, the delightful `Colours', is one of his best works. A simple, understated love song it has long been a firm favourite of mine. The album then meanders and meditates on the world, sometimes with a sense of naive awe and joy, sometimes with a darkly cynical edge. But always with a great tune and lyric. The original album closed with `The Little Tin Soldier' and `The Ballad of Geraldine', two tales that border on the twee (especially tin soldier), but are sung with such conviction that they really work rather well. It's an excellent album.

The re-issue is excellent. Great remastering, interesting extras (a contemporary EP, with the classic `Universal Soldier') and single) that add to the programme and a great set of liner notes. It's a great place for people to start their classic Donovan collection. 5 stars.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Martyn VINE VOICE on 7 July 2006
Format: Audio CD
Early Donovan album on which for the large part he sings accompanied only by his own excellent guitar-playing and poignant harmonica.

People often credit Dylan and Joan Baez with writing the best protest songs of the '60s, but there are some excellent examples of Donovan's own contributions here, not least 'Ballad of a Crystal Man'. It's also important to point out that Donovan's singing, songwriting and playing style are very much his own and i've always thought the Dylan comparisons superficial and a bit like saying the Stones sounded just like the Beatles.

There are some wonderful songs here about freedom of spirit, love and the reality of finding love and fighting for it in difficult circumstances.

'I'll try for the sun' is a truly touching song which will stay with you for a long time. 'Circus of sour' is a surreal and amusing detour, and 'Summer day reflection song' is a psychedelic classic. Meanwhile 'Colours' is one of the most uplifting songs of the '60s.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mark Barry HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Jan. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Released in October 1965, Donovan's 2nd album for Pye Records is represented here by Tracks 1 to 12 and it's something of a lost Sixties Folk/Rock classic.

The album's opener "Colours" is a balls-to-the-wall 60's classic - it truly is. "Fairytale" features a lot of tracks like that - just Donovan and his acoustic guitar - more Folk than Pop really.
In fact, when you hear almost any track on this very hard-to-find LP, it's easy to see why Donovan was often referred to as Britain's Bob Dylan. And it wasn't just because of the similar vocal styles - they were both such good songwriters and commentators on the times.

Highlights include "The Ballad Of A Crystal Man" which is represented on this disc twice - the full album version and the edited EP version - it's a fantastically strong and emotive anti-Vietnam piece equal to anything his Bobness put out on the other side of the pond. Lyrically the other songs are equally clever and even witty too. There's a "violent hash smoker" in "Sunny Goodge Street", while a quietly sinister "Jersey Thursday" gives us sly white powder references, "on a tiny piece of coloured glass, my love was born - and reds, and golds and yellows were the colours of the dawn..." Oh yeah!!

The extras (13 to 18) also make the purchase so worthwhile for fans. "Turquoise" and "Hey GYP (Dig The Slowness)" are his 3rd 7" single for Pye Records and both tracks are non-album. The last four songs, "Universal Soldier", "Do You Hear Me Now", "Ballad Of A Crystal Man" and "The War Drags On" are again non-album and make up the 4-tracks of the rare UK-only "Universal Soldier EP" from September 1965. ("Universal Soldier" and "Do You Hear Me Now" were released as a 7" in the States on Hickory).

So - a good album bolstered up with relevant bonuses.
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By Ferret on 23 Aug. 2012
Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
I've had the vinyl LP since it came out - bought from Smiths if you please (they sold a wider range of music then, although I suppose Donovan was mainstream in the late 60s). I can't say I've played it much since - it's so much of its time (Donovan's use of the term 'negroes' in Ballad of a Crystal Man may sound quaint or even offensive now, but it was the progressive usage at the time, when the word n****rs was still not unknown). Cats and seagulls, those perennial symbols of personal freedom, feature prominently. How soon the cutting edge of rebellious stoned youth turns into ancient history. This is a great evocation of the period to say the least - a nostalgic trip (haha) for those of a certain age but also a technically proficient and accomplished performance by Donovan Leitch, who was much more than just the British Dylan (a marketing niche which the suits in the major record companies were tearing their hair out to fill). And I don't say that just because he slept on my floor once in the early 1960s - many people could make that claim! Accosted in Manchester's Albert Square one fine early - very early - morning by a suspicious plod who was not used to guitar toting hippies and said `'Ello, 'ello, what are you up to my lad?', Donovan gave the classic reply `Digging the dawn, man.' This record is the distilled essence of that attitude. And I defy anybody of a certain age not to join in the harmonies after a few small sherries... Fairytale
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