• RRP: £25.50
  • You Save: £1.68 (7%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Fading Victory: The Diary... has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Contents are immaculate - ALL pages are entirely clean and free of any creases, marks or highlighting. Covers and corners are in great shape - a whisker away from "like new"; spine is uncracked and binding is perfect. Will be sent same or next working day - guaranteed! Buy from Bob - for an honest description, swift dispatch, proper packaging and A1 customer service!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fading Victory: The Diary of Adm. Matome Ugaki, 1941-1945 Paperback – 15 Mar 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£23.82
£15.58 £14.89


Product details

  • Paperback: 750 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press; 1st Naval Institute Press Pbk. Ed edition (15 Mar. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591143241
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591143246
  • Product Dimensions: 22.8 x 15.2 x 5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,427,398 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Sept. 1999
Format: Paperback
Anyone who calls themselves a true historian of the Pacific War should read this book. There are a variety of things that make this "Fading Victory" unique and important. First and foremost, Ugaki was one of Japan's leading military men and he was privy to the Japanese planning of much of the Pacific War. His mistakes, conceptions of the wartime situation, and commentary on the Allied victories and defeats create a new dimension to the Pacific War that standard histories do not provide. Furthermore, the account, unlike other wartime accounts, was not doctored or recalled years after the event. This means that what Ugaki wrote in, say June 4, 1942, is how Ugaki perceived the situation as it happened. Finally, "Fading Victories" also details the gradual defeat of Japan and how a Japanese patriot perceived it. It is almost sad to hear Ugaki in 1945 speak of countering raids by hundreds of American planes with a mere handful of Jpanese aircraft. If this were not enough, Ugaki also writes extremely well and the editors did a fantastic job of correcting him and presenting what really happened. The net result is that Ugaki's own biases become readily apparent. Do not pass this one up!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
A unique account of the Pacific War 4 Sept. 1999
By Kevin Pryor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Anyone who calls themselves a true historian of the Pacific War should read this book. There are a variety of things that make this "Fading Victory" unique and important. First and foremost, Ugaki was one of Japan's leading military men and he was privy to the Japanese planning of much of the Pacific War. His mistakes, conceptions of the wartime situation, and commentary on the Allied victories and defeats create a new dimension to the Pacific War that standard histories do not provide. Furthermore, the account, unlike other wartime accounts, was not doctored or recalled years after the event. This means that what Ugaki wrote in, say June 4, 1942, is how Ugaki perceived the situation as it happened. Finally, "Fading Victories" also details the gradual defeat of Japan and how a Japanese patriot perceived it. It is almost sad to hear Ugaki in 1945 speak of countering raids by hundreds of American planes with a mere handful of Jpanese aircraft. If this were not enough, Ugaki also writes extremely well and the editors did a fantastic job of correcting him and presenting what really happened. The net result is that Ugaki's own biases become readily apparent. Do not pass this one up!
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Not for beginners 29 May 2005
By James Hercules Sutton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The central issue in an autobiography is the character of its author. Ugaki's is replete with what he calls "Navy fighting spirit." He's sentimental, about family, lost friends and Nature. He's positive, in the worst circumstances. He's the quintissential naval officer; but, like Halsey, his strengths are also weaknesses. He understands his enemy, but underestimates him. He attacks when he should consolidate or retreat. He divides forces in the face of an enemy of unknown strength. He always "takes the bait." He never questions the logic of serving a government that has no more steering than a barge. Because his book reveals what he knew and when he knew it, it corrects misappreciations on both sides. It also exculpates Truman for dropping the Bomb, as it describes Japan's reserves hoarded against invasion and records fanatical desire to use them to the last man. Why did Ugaki commit suicide?--to take responsibility, obliged to atone for failing. He says his death will help keep alive naval spirit until Japan can rise again. Like other fascists, he blames men, not their ideology, for defeat, while looking forward to the next war. Despite his penchant for poetry, Ugaki is not a complicated man. He deserves the respect due to all those who live by a code not of their own making. His book is a study of one such man. I found it difficult to read, because of the form imposed on it as a diary and the ubiquitous feeling that Ugaki is writing for History. Read this book after you've read others about the Pacific War; it pulls missing pieces together--for example, that the Japanese were reading Allied codes, too. For a first-hand look at the consequences of decisions Ugaki made in abstraction, read Tamaichi Hara's "Japanese Destroyer Captain."
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Excellent war journal written by Admiral Ugaki. 23 Sept. 1998
By TED B. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I wondered whether this was going to be a boring self-serving narrative, but once I started reading it, it was so interesting that I couldn't stop. Ugaki details his day to day activities and lets you know his opinions and insights as he goes along. You get to like the guy, even though you know, in some cases, he's trying to fool himself about who's going to win the war. He is involved in just about everything in the Pacific War, and he narrates nicely. One of the best parts that you look forward to is where he and Yamamoto are shot down by U.S. planes. (Yamamoto is killed, but Chief of Staff Ugagki survives miraculously.) - The editor of this book every now and then corrects Ugaki (in italics) when Ugaki makes claims, such as ships sunk and planes shot down. This is extremely helpful, else you might think like Ugaki. This way you can sort of analyze Ugaki and where he's coming from. - Ugaki, the consumate samurai ends the book by demanding a kamakazi plane so he can die gloriously by sinking an enemy ship. He is unsuccessful. In the end, you sort of like and admire the guy. Very good reading if you are into the Japanese version of the Pacific War.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Ugaki: Samurai warrior to the end 9 Mar. 2011
By William S. Grass - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is the edited, English translation of the war diary of IJN Admiral Matome Ugaki, the highest ranking Japanese officer from WW2 for whom an extensive first person account is available. Ugaki kept the diary from the months leading up to the Pearl Harbor attack, until the time of the Japanese surrender in mid-August, 1945. He began the diary when he did because he was convinced that war was not far away. He diligently made entries almost every day, only occasionally having to backtrack a bit when battle situations did not permit writing on a given day. The original diary filled fifteen volumes. It was translated into English by Masataka Chihaya and condensed and edited by American co-editors Donald Goldstein and Katherine Dillon, and published in the United States under the title, "Fading Victory," in 1991.

There are two missing time periods in the diary as published in Fading Victory. The first is January through March of 1943, where the volume in question was lost by a staff officer after the war. The second gap is from April, 1943 to February, 1944, when Ugaki was convalescing from injuries sustained when the plane in which he was travelling, along with that of Yamamoto, was shot down by American P-38s over Bougainville. This time period was withheld by Ugaki's family, who claimed that it contained only personal matters of no interest to historians.

Ugaki held three important commands during the war. From April, 1941, until April, 1943, he served as Chief of Staff to Combined Fleet Commander in Chief Yamamoto. From February through November, 1944, he was commander of the First Battleship Division, comprised of super-battleships Yamato and Musashi. His final assignment was from February, 1945 through to the end of the war, as commander of the 5th Air Fleet, which fought against U.S. shipping during the Battle of Okinawa. As the war ended, and Japan's defeat became certain, Ugaki boarded a suicide plane for a final attack against U.S. ships at Okinawa. The plane was never heard from again and was presumed lost at sea.

Fading Victory is an invaluable source for anyone with more than a passing interest in the Pacific war. Nowhere else can a reader get such an immediate sense of how the high command of the Imperial Japanese Navy viewed developments as they unfolded. It is stunning to read firsthand of how decisively the initiative passed from the Japanese to the Americans in the May-August, 1942 timeframe. It is also highly instructive to see what the high command knew, and when they knew it. For example, it took them a long time to figure out how strong the Americans were on Guadalcanal, and Ugaki never expresses any suspicions that Japanese codes have been compromised, even after his plane was intercepted and shot down and Yamamoto, in the other plane, was killed. Later in the war, viewing developments through Ugaki's eyes, readers can appreciate his utter exasperation at seeing the U.S. fast carrier task force going where it pleases, arrogantly attacking targets, once considered invulnerable, with virtual impunity.

Ugaki does very little philosophizing or self-examination in his diary. Most of his entries report on the day's military developments. In the aftermath of battles, he does some analysis on lessons learned and how to improve for the future. What little sentimentality he expresses usually has to do with the memory of his wife, Tomoko, who died in 1940, or old Eta Jima classmates who are killed in combat. He does display an appreciation for nature, and often accompanies his observations on the natural world with a few lines of poetry. For recreation, he often goes ashore hunting. The whole notion of death, even intentional death, in combat seems natural to Ugaki and simply part of the Japanese warrior ethos. His command of kamikazes during the Okinawa campaign and his own decision to end his life in that fashion at the end flows naturally from his worldview and in no way comes across as an act of desperation.

There is no doubt that Fading Victory is an important read for Americans seeking greater understanding of the Pacific war. The editors, Goldstein and Dillon, have done a good job of maintaining narrative flow, inserting pertinent commentary when necessary, while preserving the style of a diary. However, there are some errors in the documenting text. For example, the destroyer Sims, sunk at Coral Sea, is described as an oiler. Admiral Crace, commander of Task Force 44 at Coral Sea, is called "Grace." The Americal division, upon arriving at Guadalcanal, is called the "American" division. A photo caption describes the Yorktown (CV-5) sinking in "January," 1942. The presence of these mistakes indicates that the final version was not proofread by the editors. Steeped in all things Pacific war under the tutelage of Gordon Prange, Goldstein and Dillon could have corrected these very easily.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
A True-to-Life Account 11 Dec. 1999
By Alan Ohashi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Though I am a Japanese American born after WWII, I wanted to know what was going through the minds of the Japanese in Japan who decided to bomb Pearl Harbor and get involved in the conflict. This book got me about as close as I could get to talking to someone high up and powerful in the Japanese naval command. The highs, the lows, the delusions, the misconceptions, the hopes, aspirations - they are all clearly laid out. The account of Yamamoto's death and Ugaki's survival is better than an Indiana Jones-tale. The main thing you come away with is this man's patriotism and devotion to a misguided cause. Ugaki and Japan seriously misjudged their strength versus the power and resources of the United States and their allies.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback