Facts are Sacred: Text only ebook and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £3.41 (17%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Facts are Sacred has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by totnes_books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: -- UNREAD COPY WITH LIGHT CRUSH DAMAGE TO SPINE OF BOOK - CONTENT UNAFFECTED -- GOOD OVERALL CONDITION - PLEASE SEE OUR OTHER TITLES BY THIS AUTHOR - IN STOCK - DISPATCHED WITHIN 1 WORKING DAY VIA ROYAL MAIL - WE ARE AVAILABLE BY EMAIL FOR QUERIES -
Trade in your item
Get a £2.65
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Facts are Sacred Hardcover – 4 Apr 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£16.59
£10.77 £10.36
£16.59 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.

Frequently Bought Together

Facts are Sacred + The Infographic History of the World + Information is Beautiful (New Edition)
Price For All Three: £47.19

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £2.65
Trade in Facts are Sacred for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.65, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (4 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571301614
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571301614
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 3.1 x 25.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 107,875 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MY WORK AT: simonrogers.net

Simon Rogers is data editor at Twitter in San Francisco. He launched and edited guardian.co.uk/data, an online data resource which publishes hundreds of raw datasets and encourages its users to visualise and analyse them - and probably the world's most popular data journalism website.

He was also a news editor on the Guardian, working with the graphics team to visualise and interpret huge datasets.

He was closely involved in the Guardian's exercise to crowdsource 450,000 MP expenses records and the organisation's coverage of the Afghanistan and Iraq Wikileaks war logs. He was also a key part of the Reading the Riots team which investigated the causes of the 2011 England disturbances.

Previously he was the launch editor of the Guardian's online news service and has edited the paper's science section. He has edited three Guardian books, including How Slow Can You Waterski and The Hutton Inquiry and its impact.

In 2012, Simon received the Royal Statistical Society's award for statistical excellence in journalism (online category), having been commended by the Society in 2010.

His Factfile UK series of supplements won a silver at the Malofiej 2011 infographics award and the Datablog won the Newspaper Awards prize for Best Use of New Media, 2011.

In 2011, Simon was named Best UK Internet Journalist by the Oxford Internet Institute, Oxford University and won the inaugural XCity award from City University.

The Datastore was also honoured at:
Online Media Awards, 2012 (commendation)
Knight Batten awards for innovation in journalism, 2011
Technical innovation, Online Media Awards 2011
Best use of new media for Guardian Datablog, Newspaper Awards 2011

Product Description

Book Description

Facts are Sacred by Simon Rogers is a full-colour guide to the data that shapes our lives, looking behind the headlines and the soundbites to what's really going on.

About the Author

Simon Rogers is the editor of guardian.co.uk/data and a news editor on the Guardian, working with the graphics team to bring figures to life on the page. He was closely involved with the Guardian's groundbreaking decision to crowdsource 450,000 MP expenses records, as well as the organisation's coverage of the Afghanistan and Iraq 'Wikileaks' war logs. In 2010, Simon received a special commendation from the Royal Statistical Society in its awards for journalistic excellence. In 2011, the datalog won the Newspaper Awards prize for Best Use of New Media, the Knight Batten award for innovation in journalism and the Online Media award for innovation in journalism.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mona Chalabi on 26 April 2013
Format: Hardcover
The book description (both online and physical) offers this as a guide to data, and that's exactly what it is. By presenting so many examples, from murder to MP's money to multiculturalism, the author gives you the chance to question whether patterns exist and, if they do, learn how you can find and show them.

It's true, the book doesn't give you a step-by-step guide to how to make a bar graph but that's what makes it so great. At least half of the book's 311 pages are printed with graphics that change the way we think about communicating complex information. And that's actually the first step in the real 'how to'. Because if you don't take the time to stop and think about what you want to say and how you want to say it, you won't get very far learning about data.

Note: I know the author but I'm not obliged to say nice things as we no longer work together - every word is sincere, buy the book and see for yourself!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. W. Jewitt on 19 April 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I purchased this on the back of a Guardian Tech Weekly podcast (12 Apr 2013) in which the author was being interviewed. In this, it was suggested that this book may be a useful 'how to' tool. This is only true to a point in that it talks about the theoretical arguments around data journalism, but it is less an instruction manual than I believed it to be. This misunderstanding was compounded by the lack of internal book preview feature before the purchase. The final chapter does offer some broad observations on data journalism practices, but it's not sustained or detailed.

Nevertheless, this is a beautiful coffee-table book in the style of David McCandless' data visualisations, e.g. Information is Beautiful (New Edition). It contains many of the high profile visualisations that have graced the pages of guardian.co.uk in recent years). Just don't come to this expecting to learn techniques and you won't be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ripple TOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 Feb. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
“Facts are Sacred” is really more about the rise of data-journalism rather than information per se. And Simon Rogers, the editor of the Guardian’s excellent Datablog is well placed to comment on this and is arguably at the forefront of the use of data in journalism.

The book, though, is a slightly strange and at times feels unfocussed and as if it is trying to do too much at one time. Yes, there are many nicely reproduced displays of information - some more effective than others and some easier to follow than others - and some are intriguing in their own right. However, also running through the book is Rogers’s manifesto for open data and the rise of data journalism. Often the text is well observed and interesting but it battles to hold the reader’s focus against the plethora of often random data that runs alongside.

To give one example from near the end of the book, there is a case study on the use of data journalism in covering hurricane Sandy. There’s interesting words on the challenges and how they were overcome, and some nice pictures and graphs of what happened. Throughout the book there are circular, what you might call “sidebars” of information. In this part of the book, one such info-circle tells how many people lost power in the aftermath of the storm (8.5 million, in case you were wondering). Another, on the same page though tells us how many Nobel Peace Prize winners were female (15, since you ask). And this is the problem - in this instance, if the circles are going to be unrelated to the text then fine - but why have half that are and half that aren’t. It makes no sense and the problem is that this rather strengthens the feeling that some data presentations are just data for the sake of data rather than really providing illumination.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Lyne on 27 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A worthwhile read but very much conceptual without much time spent exploring the specifics of data journalism. Good examples of its influence in modern society but little as to how it could or should be improved or how we can play a part.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By David R Shinkins on 27 July 2014
Format: Hardcover
Very good.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Bailey on 9 April 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
How to bring clarity to chaos, with beautiful presentation. For journalists who want to delve deeper into the enormous wealth of data now available online, and tell compelling stories from it, this is inspirational.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By obui on 17 Aug. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Need this book in my life, finally got it after seeing it at the Tate Modern. This book is great for the creative who cant visualise numbers and facts , great use of colour, charts and diagrams.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By barbara pym reader on 28 April 2013
Format: Hardcover
This is a beautiful book with stunning visuals. Easy to read this is a perfect buy for anyone interested in this expanding area of journalism and the impact it has on our everyday lives.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback