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  • The Face At The Window (DVD) (1939) (All Regions) (NTSC) (US Import)
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The Face At The Window (DVD) (1939) (All Regions) (NTSC) (US Import)


Price: £2.21
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.
8 new from £2.20 5 used from £1.57
Region 1 encoding. (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.
£2.21 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.

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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000641ZRW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 106,584 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By C. J. Marton on 4 Nov. 2007
Forget Karloff & Lugosi. Forget Cushing & Lee, even Price and the Chaneys. Tod is king of horror for one very important reason - he quite evidently enjoys his work. This was the first Tod film I saw and - having heard so much about him prior to this - I feared disappointment. No worries. Despite the cardboard settings and woeful support cast, from the moment he strides masterfully in, we are in the capable hands of a classic film villain. The opening murder with the eerie wolf howl on the soundtracks sets the scene perfectly and then we are treated to an acting masterclass from the great man himself. Whether innocently acting the concerned friend, lecherously trying to sneak a kiss from the heroine, threatening his low-life confederates with a grisly end if they cross him or, worst of all, holding somewhat one-sided conversations with his demented foster brother, Tod holds the film together. The Chevalier is underplayed by Tod compared to Sweeney Todd - but seldom has one man wiggled his eyebrows to more sinister effect. It's a great pity that Universal studios didn't try to to entice him over for their classic horror cycle - Tod would've made a far more spirited Dracula than John Carradine in the later sequels and can't you just see him going toe to toe with Basil Rathbone's Sherlock Holmes. Shame nobody thought of putting him up against Arthur Wontner's in the UK. The double-exposure effects for the appearance of the "face" are well done for their time and the whole film compares favourably with the Universal classics of the period.

The production values are far higher than is normal for a British quota quickie of the period.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 Dec. 2004
This 1940 George King production from British Lion Studios is a delightfully evil if somewhat hokey little horror film. The setting is Paris, France in the year 1880, and a series of murders has the populace in mortal terror of "Le Loup" ("the wolf"). Why the killer is described as a wolfman is beyond me because in each case, the victim sees a horrifying face in the window and is stabbed in the back with a dagger. When M. de Brisson's bank is robbed during one murder, he fears he will be ruined financially. Then a new client, Chevalier Del Gardo appears to entrust a substantial amount of money to his care; the Chevalier's motives are far from noble, however, as he wants the hand of the young, beautiful Cecile de Brisson in return for his help. Cecile is in love with "lowly" bank clerk Lucien Cortier, and Del Gardo attempts to frame him for the murders. Several additional murders are perpetrated during the course of the story, and Lucien's last opportunity to prove his innocence involves a great new discovery made by a "mad" (yet noble) scientist. This scientist has successfully used electricity to reanimate dead animals, and he is convinced that he can do the same for a dead human; in this manner, one of Le Loup's victims will be able to come back just long enough to name his murderer.
I found this to be an excellent early horror flick. Some elements of the plot are a little ridiculous, but the actors play their parts exceedingly well and do not at any time overdramatize and thus undermine the story.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By FAMOUS NAME VINE VOICE on 19 Aug. 2008
Tod Slaughter is his usual ruthless charming self in this 30s classic: 'The Face At The Window'!

Victims are subjected to the sighting of a hideous drooling 'face at the window' just seconds before they meet with their death. 'Chevalier Lucio Del Gardo' pursues relentlessly the hand of the beautiful Banker's daughter played by Marjorie Taylor, but his plans are thwarted when he discovers that she is already in love with a the handsome, but penniless Bank Clerk that works for her father. There seems to be no stopping at the lengths 'Chevalier' (Tod Slaughter) will go to to secure the hand of his future bride... Will he succeed?

There is a great twist at the end of this movie that is not to be missed!

Also stars Margaret Yarde as the usual 'dragon' battleaxe!

Great vintage over-the-top drama!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Not Great Print Quality 17 Jan. 2005
By HungryJack - Published on Amazon.com
I would go for the Arcanum version of this film as the print quality is better and it's paired in a double feature with Tod Slaughter's MURDER IN THE RED BARN. A MUCH better value.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
An impressive old-school horror movie 15 Dec. 2004
By Daniel Jolley - Published on Amazon.com
This 1940 George King production from British Lion Studios is a delightfully evil if somewhat hokey little horror film. The setting is Paris, France in the year 1880, and a series of murders has the populace in mortal terror of "Le Loup" ("the wolf"). Why the killer is described as a wolfman is beyond me because in each case, the victim sees a horrifying face in the window and is stabbed in the back with a dagger. When M. de Brisson's bank is robbed during one murder, he fears he will be ruined financially. Then a new client, Chevalier Del Gardo appears to entrust a substantial amount of money to his care; the Chevalier's motives are far from noble, however, as he wants the hand of the young, beautiful Cecile de Brisson in return for his help. Cecile is in love with "lowly" bank clerk Lucien Cortier, and Del Gardo attempts to frame him for the murders. Several additional murders are perpetrated during the course of the story, and Lucien's last opportunity to prove his innocence involves a great new discovery made by a "mad" (yet noble) scientist. This scientist has successfully used electricity to reanimate dead animals, and he is convinced that he can do the same for a dead human; in this manner, one of Le Loup's victims will be able to come back just long enough to name his murderer.

I found this to be an excellent early horror flick. Some elements of the plot are a little ridiculous, but the actors play their parts exceedingly well and do not at any time overdramatize and thus undermine the story. Tod Slaughter plays the evil Chevalier Del Gardo to the hilt and could rightfully make reference to a truly evil cackle on his acting resume, John Warwick as Lucien Cortier shines as the quintessential hero determined to clear his name and nab the true killer, and Marjorie Taylor is delightful as Cecile de Brisson. The special effects, such as they are, are also very effective, particularly the coalescing image of the hideous "face at the window." The introductory text that introduces the motion picture sums the movie up quite well; The Face at the Window is an old-school melodrama "dear to the hearts of all who unashamedly enjoy either a shudder or a laugh at the heights of villainy."
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