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The Faber Book of Science Paperback – 17 Mar 2005

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Frequently Bought Together

The Faber Book of Science + The Faber Book of Reportage + The Intellectuals and the Masses: Pride and Prejudice Among the Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939
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Product details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (17 Mar. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571179010
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571179015
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 4 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 349,203 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

The Faber Book of Science, edited by John Carey, charts the progress of science through its luminaries and heroes, from Leonardo da Vinci to Richard Dawkins, via Charles Darwin, T. H. Huxley, Jean Henri Fabre and many, many others.

About the Author

John Carey is an Emeritus Professor at Oxford University. His books include studies of Donne, Dickens and Thackeray, The Intellectuals and the Masses, What Good Are the Arts? and a life of William Golding., John Carey is an Emeritus Professor at Oxford University and a Fellow of the British Academy. His books include studies of Donne, Dickens and Thackeray, The Intellectuals and the Masses, What Good Are the Arts? and a life of William Golding.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Keith Appleyard VINE VOICE on 11 Oct. 2003
Format: Paperback
If you're interested in Science, but want to study some new topics, meet some new people, reading about their achievements in their own words or of their contemporaries, then this book cannot be surpassed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brian R. Martin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Oct. 2014
Format: Paperback
This is a collection of scientific writings spanning several hundred years from the Renaissance to modern times. John Carey has obviously read very widely to compile the entries, which range over many topics in the physical and biological sciences, and, as befitting a professor of English, he has made his choice not only on the importance of the topic, but also on the quality of the writing. The contributions vary from a single page to several pages; some have extensive commentaries from the editor, others just a note on the source reference. They also vary in style. There are classic pieces of writing about seminal discoveries such as radioactivity, X-rays, and the atomic nucleus, by the discoverers themselves; commentaries by eyewitnesses or later interpreters and biographers; and personal accounts by eminent scientists about how their ideas evolved with time. One of the longest entries of the latter type is Darwin on evolution. There are also occasional lighter pieces, such as the story of how Bird's Custard Powder came to be invented, and even a few contributions, including poems, from well-known literary names who were also amateur observers of nature. I enjoyed reading this collection. It is of course a personal selection and one can think of many other possible entries, but most are well written and informative and their length means that one can dip into the book and read some of them when one has a few minutes to spare.
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By Trigger on 7 Feb. 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book to dip into now and again. Well written and plenty of surprises for those that want to know more about the science that surrounds us.
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