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The Exorcist (25th Anniversary Special Edition) [Region 1 NTSC] [1974] [DVD] [US Import]

4.4 out of 5 stars 307 customer reviews

15 used from £0.13 2 collectible from £6.99

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Product details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (307 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 079073804X
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 76,743 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Seeing the Exorcist again now after nearly 30 years, I'm struck by how it stands out from its genre. Friedkin had already shown himself to be a master of characterisation and ambiguity with the extraordinary French Connection, and the Exorcist is definitely as good. The scenes between Karras and his mother are beautifully and subtly scripted, as are J Lee Cobb's scenes. Maybe the shock value of the possession scenes has faded a bit over the years, but the encephalogram scene is still incredibly powerful and affecting, showing the terrible ordeal Regan has to go through. Friedkin's commentary track is a bit disappointing, being little more than a step outline, but it is nonetheless interesting to hear his very personal confession of faith.
Horror movies (and genre movies in general) are fascinating when they step outside of the boundaries set by their genre, and the Exorcist - probably because it was written by the novelist himself - shows a depth of characterisation that few horror movies ever reach or even attempt to. Compared to the rash of stereotyped and unimaginative exorcism movies in recent years, the Exorcist has lost none of its power and stands head and shoulders above the rest of the crop. You don't have to like the horror genre to appreciate and be moved by Regan's suffering and her mother's desperation, and, for me at least, this is what the movie is about.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I was torn between purchasing a version of the Blu-ray that was £17.99 and this version £6.50. Reason being, the latter did not state whether it had the extended director's cut version along with all of the extras. However I chose to purchase this version [ASIN: B00BMVCYYG].

Now that I own this copy, I'm extremely satisfied and thought I'd do those who would like to know what's on this Blu-ray, a favour and list the details of what's on this version as it may prove helpful to some. I won't review the film as I don't think it needs one - it's The Exorcist and an excellent transfer considering original film stock.

Region Free + UV Copy

Disc 1:

Extended Director's Cut (2000 Version) 132 minutes
Raising Hell: Filming The Exorcist (Documentary)
The Exorcist Locations: Georgetown Then and Now (Documentary)
Faces of Evil: The Different Versions of The Exorcist (Documentary)
Commentary by Director William Friedkin

Disc 2:

Original Theatrical Cut (1973 Version) 122 minutes
Commentary by Director William Friedkin
Commentary by Producer/Writer William Peter Blatty
Feature Length 1998 Documentary - The Fer of God: The Making of The Exorcist
Interview Gallery Covering the Topics: The Original Cut, The Final Reckoning and Stairway to Heaven
Original Ending
6 Comments 45 of 47 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: DVD
I did not find this scary, well, in fact I lie, I did at the age of seven where I accidentally watched five minutes with my grandmother, before she realised what it was! But now, watching it fully and being able to appreciate its brilliance, this film makes you think long and hard, especially as I am not atheist. And entirely by the way, watching this film if you have any belief in God, then it is best not to take it seriously as it is terrifying. I am not decided about religion and I watched it not as a scary film, but a tragedy. Regan, played by Linda Blair (who is alive and well if anyone has heard the rumour she killed herself after filming it) and an array of other cast, bring the ideas behind the Devil to life. If you laugh through this film I think you are denying your true understanding of it as in no way is it funny, it is horrific to see how the Devil forces the girl to some controversial things, still controversial today, come to that. Being 16, I still have a lot left to understand about how the world works, but it is still enough to make you realise how precious life is, and I assume when you are older to respect the film even more. It is one of those films that sticks with you for a long time, one that you will never forget, and if you are in a thinking mood you can go to it to question the motives of living things.

The music, Mike Oldfield's 'Tubular Bells' makes a recurring rendition in your mind as the eeriness of the story evolves. The most shocking scene is where the priest enters the room and sees his sick mother in the place where Regan should be; the clever change in colour makes it all the more startling. Many refer to the more famous parts, like the 360-degree turn of the head, but its fame makes it less scary.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Overall I think both versions of the film look excellent. With a few scenes, especially the very beginning in Iraq, I wouldn't even guess that they were filmed in 1973, it's that good. However, I noticed some dark scenes that are a bit grainy, the scene with Father Dyer drinking with Karras after his mother's death for example. It wasn't bad enough to distract me from the film though.

The extras are also worth some praise. One of the commentaries contained a sound effects test which involved Blair's voice being compared/mixed with McCambridge's, that was pretty awesome. The new 3-part documentary was good, albeit a little short in my opinion. I still prefer the older documentary 'Fear of God: The Making of The Exorcist' (located on disc 2) which I think covered a broader range of the filming. Nevertheless, all the extras put together (including the three commentaries) gives you a clear idea of what it was like filming 'The Exorcist' and you learn a great deal about the film (which the director calls a story about "the mystery of faith", and you see why) and the effect it had on the world.
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