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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (30 Oct. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141042168
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141042169
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 124,263 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies at Oxford University. He is a former Director of the Development Research group at the World Bank. His are aof research is the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid; and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural-resource-rich societies. His multi-award-winning book The Bottom Billion was published in 2007.


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Review

Exodus is an important book and one I have been waiting to read for many years ... [it is] a work that is humane and hard-headed about one of the greatest issues of our times (David Goodhart Sunday Times)

Paul Collier is one of the world's most thoughtful economists. His books consistently illuminate and provoke. Exodus is no exception (The Economist)

Tinged with poignancy ... a humane and sensible voice in a highly toxic debate (Colin Kidd Guardian)

Paul Collier's new book on international migration is magisterial. It offers a sophisticated, comprehensive, incisive, multidisciplinary, well-written balance sheet of the pros and cons of immigration for receiving societies, sending societies, and migrants themselves. For everyone on all sides of this contentious issue, Exodus is a "must-read" (Robert D. Putnam, Professor of Public Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University)

[Praise for Paul Collier's The Plundered Planet]: A must-read (Sunday Times)

A path-breaking book (George Soros)

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By markr TOP 500 REVIEWER on 17 Feb. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a well reasoned exploration of the intentions of immigration and immigration policy and of some of the unintended consequences of the decisions taken by governments and indeed by migrants and their families.

Looking at the effects of immigration on host populations, for migrants, and for those left behind, the author, Paul Collier, has succeeded in providing a very readable account which stays away from the extremes of liberal or conservative mind sets, and provides good evidence throughout to substantiate his arguments.

Supplemented and illuminated by easy to follow graphs, this is a book to make you think, and to challenge some of the packages of beliefs held by many of us on this emotive issue.

It certainly made me challenge some of my assumptions about the ethics and effects of immigration, and to reconsider some of what I had previously held to be self evident truths, and to remember that the goldilocks principle of moderation really does apply to most things.

Very interesting and thought provoking
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By B. Sebastien on 4 Jan. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In a debate that is unhelpfully shrill and ideological on both sides, Collier takes a refreshingly cear-headed and objective path, walking his reader through the theory and empirical evidence to arrive at a few broad conclusions. In short, while immigration from the very poor, dysfunctional countries of the Bottom Billion to rich, successful countries is a huge economic boon for the migrants themselves and modestly beneficial to the receiving societies and economies too, the social and political costs are getting higher and higher as diaspora communities get larger and larger, and popular hostility among the indigenous population grows, jeopardising the high levels of mutual social trust and regard that made the complex cooperationn systems that advanced countries have put in place over time possible. Collier also looks at the cost to the countries of origin, who are losing many of their most qualified, enterprising and productive citizens.

The ideology of "Multiculturalism", which encourages migrants to keep their own cultures instead of assimilating to the host country's, exacerbates problems since it delays the assimilation process necessary to ensure their integration into the economy and society and undermines the high levels of mutual acceptance and trust welfare states require. He also questions the wisdom of encouraging migrants to hold on to social models that are in large part responsible for the dysfunctional societies they fled in the first place.

Given that on current trends and with the current policies in place, this migration is only going to accelerate in the years to come, Collier makes a convincing case that the flows have to be more tightly regulated in Europe than is the case today if we are to preserve our welfare states and ensure the acceptance, integration and success of the migrants already here.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By William Podmore on 7 Jan. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies at Oxford University. In this important book, he asks, how much migration is best for Britain?

There were 92 million immigrants in 1960, 165 million in 2000. Migration from the rich world to the poor world fell, as did migration from Europe to the USA. The big change was migration from the poor world to the rich - from under 20 million to more than 60 million. The increase accelerated decade by decade.

He notes that immigration's "social effects are usually likely to trump economic effects, in part because the economic effects are usually modest. For the neediest sections among the indigenous population the net effects of migration are often probably negative."

As he points out, "What is good for business is not necessarily good for indigenous people. The short-term interest of business is for the open door: it is cheaper to recruit already-skilled migrants than to train indigenous youth, and the pool of talent will be wider when the door is more open. It is in the interest of the indigenous population to force firms that want to benefit from the country's social model to train its youth and hire its workers. Germany stands as testimony that such a policy need not drive business abroad."

Collier states, "migration can be excessive. I show that, left to itself, migration will keep accelerating, so that it is liable to become excessive."

He explains, "left to the decentralized decisions of potential migrants, migration accelerates until low-income countries are substantially depopulated. The acceleration principle follows from two indisputable features of migration.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By tiger moto on 10 Mar. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Best book on migration.Distills the true economic and social costs of mass migration.Every politician should read it.His suggestion is that moderate migration is good for host and recipient country.Migration watch and UKIP seem to say the same thing,yet in the mass media they are seen as racist
With simple to understand diagrams the good professor looks at all the options and their consequences,and gives workable solutions to this most notty of problems.Buy this book and you will have the knowledge to evaluate debates on migration which often become polarised.
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