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Eve's Diary (Fully Illustrated) [Kindle Edition]

Mark Twain , LCI , Lester Ralph

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Book Description

-With 55 original Illustrations by Lester Ralph.
-Table of contents to every chapters in the book.
-Complete and formatted for kindle to improve your reading experience

Eve's Diary is a comic short story by Mark Twain. It was first published in the 1905 Christmas issue of the magazine Harper's Bazaar, and in book format in June 1906 by Harper and Brothers[1] publishing house. It is written in the style of a diary kept by the first woman in the biblical creation story, Eve, and is claimed to be "translated from the original MS." The "plot" of this novel is the first-person account of Eve from her creation up to her burial by, her mate, Adam, including meeting and getting to know Adam, and exploring the world around her, Eden. The story then jumps 40 years into the future after the Fall and expulsion from Eden. It is one of a series of books Twain wrote concerning the story of Adam and Eve, including 'Extracts from Adam's Diary,' 'That Day In Eden,' 'Eve Speaks,' 'Adam's Soliloquy,' and the 'Autobiography of Eve.' Eve's Diary has a lighter tone than the others in the series, as Eve has a strong appreciation for beauty and love. The book may have been written as a posthumous love-letter to Mark Twain's wife Olivia Langdon Clemens, or Livy, who died in June 1904, just before the story was written. Mark Twain is quoted as saying, "Eve's Diary is finished — I've been waiting for her to speak, but she doesn't say anything more." The story ends with Adam's speaking at Eve's grave, "Wherever she was, there was Eden."
The book version of the story was published with 55 illustrations by Lester Ralph, on each left hand page. The illustrations depicted Eve and Adam in their natural settings. The depiction of an unclothed woman was considered pornographic when the book was first released in the United States, and created a controversy around the book. One library in Charlton, Massachusetts banned the book for the depictions of Eve in "summer costume."
When contacted Twain replied:
“ The action of the Charlton library was not of the slightest interest to me. ”
Two weeks later, after testifying before Congress, he elaborated as reported in the Washington Herald,
“ The whole episode has rather amused me. I have no feeling of vindictiveness over the stand of the librarians there — I am only amused. You see they did not object to my book; they objected to Lester Ralph's pictures. I wrote the book; I did not make the pictures. I admire the pictures, and I heartily approve them, but I did not make them.

It seems curious to me — some of the incidents in this case. It appears that the pictures in Eve's Diary were first discovered by a lady librarian. When she made the dreadful find, being very careful, she jumped at no hasty conclusions — not she — she examined the horrid things in detail. It took her some time to examine them all, but she did her hateful duty! I don't blame her for this careful examination; the time she spent was, I am sure, enjoyable, for I found considerable fascination in them myself.

Then she took the book to another librarian, a male this time, and he, also, took a long time to examine the unclothed ladies. He must have found something of the same sort of fascination in them that I found…

In a letter to a friend, Harriett E. Whitmore, he commented:
“ the truth is, that when a Library expels a book of mine and leaves an unexpurgated Bible lying around where unprotected youth and age can get hold of it, the deep unconscious irony of it delights me and doesn't anger me.


Product Description

Synopsis

THIS 32 PAGE ARTICLE WAS EXTRACTED FROM THE BOOK: Their Husbands' Wives: Harper's Novelettes, by Mark Twain. To purchase the entire book, please order ISBN 1417902337.

About the Author

Mark Twain (1835 –1910) was an American author and humorist. He is noted for his novels Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), called "the Great American Novel", and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876). Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. He apprenticed with a printer. He also worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion's newspaper. After toiling as a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River, before heading west to join Orion. He was a failure at gold mining, so he next turned to journalism. While a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which proved to be very popular and brought him nationwide attention. His travelogues were also well-received. Twain had found his calling. He achieved great success as a writer and public speaker. His wit and satire earned praise from critics and peers, and he was a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists, and European royalty. However, he lacked financial acumen. Though he made a great deal of money from his writings and lectures, he squandered it on various ventures, in particular the Paige Compositor, and was forced to declare bankruptcy. With the help of Henry Huttleston Rogers, however, he eventually overcame his financial troubles. Twain worked hard to ensure that all of his creditors were paid in full, even though his bankruptcy had relieved him of the legal responsibility. Born during a visit by Halley's Comet, he died on its return. He was lauded as the "greatest American humorist of his age", and William Faulkner called Twain "the father of American literature".

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2987 KB
  • Print Length: 28 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: LCI Ebooks (19 Jun. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00L4Q5HI4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #877,914 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Mark Twain is the pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835 - 1910). He was born and brought up in the American state of Missouri and, because of his father's death, he left school to earn his living when he was only twelve. He was a great adventurer and travelled round America as a printer; prospected for gold and set off for South America to earn his fortune. He returned to become a steam-boat pilot on the Mississippi River, close to where he had grown up. The Civil War put an end to steam-boating and Clemens briefly joined the Confederate army - although the rest of his family were Unionists! He had already tried his hand at newspaper reporting and now became a successful journalist. He started to use the alias Mark Twain during the Civil War and it was under this pen name that he became a famous travel writer. He took the name from his steam-boat days - it was the river pilots' cry to let their men know that the water was two fathoms deep.

Mark Twain was always nostalgic about his childhood and in 1876 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was published, based on his own experiences. The book was soon recognised as a work of genius and eight years later the sequel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, was published. The great writer Ernest Hemingway claimed that 'All modern literature stems from this one book.'

Mark Twain was soon famous all over the world. He made a fortune from writing and lost it on a typesetter he invented. He then made another fortune and lost it on a bad investment. He was an impulsive, hot-tempered man but was also quite sentimental and superstitious. He was born when Halley's Comet was passing the Earth and always believed he would die when it returned - this is exactly what happened.


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eve's Diary: Mark Twain's tiny masterpiece, banned no longer 3 Oct. 2012
By John Williamson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Only someone with such a splendid sense of humor and a joy for life as Mark Twain could have pulled this off... but there's a story behind the story, and another one beyond that, so read on.

Eve's Diary is an entertaining, truly delightful piece written in the style of a diary kept by the first woman, Eve. This Kindle version has all of the illustrations that were done by Lester Ralph. Originally published in the 1905 Christmas issue of Harper's Bazaar magazine, it was popular enough to be subsequently published in book format in June 1906 by the Harper & Brothers publishing house. You'll see the red cover of that first edition posted by this reviewer in the images here.

Mark Twain was 70 at the time of the initial publication of this story, and his works in his later years were inclined to be somewhat critical and even vitriolic. But this little story was warm, heartfelt, and emotional. He had suffered the loss of his much-loved wife Livy in 1904, and it's clear that he had reflected on his married existence in Eve's Diary as his own private Eden with Livy. Through his words we see the `first woman' to be more open, candid and seemingly smarter than her companion, and his life was all the better for her being there.

Mark Twain wrote the story in the style of a diary kept by Eve, the first woman in the Judeo-Christian creation. It's claimed by the author to have been "translated from the original MS." The storyline of Twain's novel is the first-person account of Eve from her creation up to her burial by her mate, Adam, including meeting and getting to know him, and exploring the world around her, the Garden of Eden. The following is posted here not as a spoiler but as a teaser, and is the first entry of Eve's diary:

"SATURDAY. -- I am almost a whole day old, now. I arrived yesterday. That is as it seems to me. And it must be so, for if there was a day-before-yesterday I was not there when it happened, or I should remember it. It could be, of course, that it did happen, and that I was not noticing. Very well; I will be very watchful now, and if any day-before-yesterdays happen I will make a note of it. It will be best to start right and not let the record get confused, for some instinct tells me that these details are going to be important to the historian some day. For I feel like an experiment, I feel exactly like an experiment; it would be impossible for a person to feel more like an experiment than I do, and so I am coming to feel convinced that that is what I AM--an experiment; just an experiment, and nothing more."

In this Kindle edition, that journal entry is placed it's placed between two of Lester Ralph's beautifully rendered black and white line drawings. The story goes on and then jumps forty years into the future after the fall and expulsion from Eden.

This one of a string of books that Twain wrote concerning the tale of Adam and Eve, including 'Extracts from Adam's Diary,' 'That Day In Eden,' 'Eve Speaks,' 'Adam's Soliloquy,' and the 'Autobiography of Eve.' `Eve's Diary' was a short companion piece to his earlier comic story `Extracts from Adam's Diary,' a light comical burlesque on the Book of Genesis.

But there's more to the story than this.

The original book version of the story was published with 55 illustrations by Lester Ralph, and they depicted Eve and Adam in their natural settings... in other words, in their birthday suits. Some considered the depiction of an unclothed woman obscene when the book was first released in the United States, and that resulted in a controversy around the book.

Then The New York Times posted an article dated November 24, 1906, noting that `'Eve's Diary' had been among 100 books bought for the Charlton Public Library in Massachusetts, and had been barred by Frank O. Wakefield, one of the Trustees. The other Trustees concurred with him. The librarian, Mrs. Hattie L. Carpenter, had looked through it, and had brought this book to his attention. As the Times reported:

"After looking long and earnestly at on picture depicting Eve pensively reclining on a rock, Mr. Wakefield decided to act."

When contacted about this event, Mark Twain responded: "The action of the Charlton library was not of the slightest interest to me."

But the banned book story doesn't end there.

On September 21, 2011, the New York Times ran an article stating that after 105 years `Eve's Diary' was back on the shelf. Richard Whitehead, a new library trustee at that same library happened to stumble on the old forgotten controversy about the book. As the article reported:

"More than a century later, Mr. Whitehead and his fellow trustees voted unanimously (with one of the six absent) on Tuesday to lift the ban and bring `Eve's Diary' back to their brick library on Main Street. Two copies of the book -- with Mr. Ralph's illustrations, which now seem quite chaste -- were put into circulation on Wednesday, as was an audio version for those who prefer to conjure their own images."

Even better, the library made the book the focus of their exhibit for national Banned Book Week, which started that weekend.

And now you can enjoy your own copy of Mark Twain's banned book right here. Though there's no table of contents, this is a nicely formatted Kindle edition, and the publishers should be commended for keeping the original version intact... just as it was when the late library trustee Frank Wakefield opened the red cover of Eve's Diary over a century ago, and after looking "long and earnestly" at the picture that depicted "Eve pensively reclining on a rock," and he decided to act, obviously in the public welfare.

Something tells me that the ghost of Mark Twain had a good laugh over that.

10/3/2012
3.0 out of 5 stars A companion to "Extracts from Adam's Diaries" 7 May 2009
By DWD's Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
"Eve's Diary" and "Extracts from Adam's Diary" are often sold together but they were not originally published together. "Adam's Diary" is a must read before you read this one, in my opinion because "Eve's Diary" is really just supplemental to "Adam's".

"Adam's Diary" is also the superior work - it is much funnier, contains many more entries and is truly a stand-alone work.

However, they really are intended to be read as a set so go ahead and get them both.
3.0 out of 5 stars A companion to "Extracts From Adam's Diary" 7 May 2009
By DWD's Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
"Eve's Diary" and "Extracts from Adam's Diary" are often sold together but they were not originally published together. "Adam's Diary" is a must read before you read this one, in my opinion because "Eve's Diary" is really just supplemental to "Adam's".

"Adam's Diary" is also the superior work - it is much funnier, contains many more entries and is truly a stand-alone work.

However, they really are intended to be read as a set so go ahead and get them both.
1 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Eve's Diary 30 Nov. 2005
By Crackerboy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The reason i give this book 3 stars is because it gives a idea of what they might have thought about and the idea's he thinks they have had interest me. Especially the idea that someone stole the moon i liked that because they dont know anything so they are like little kids. I think thats funny. Grown people acting like kids. Mark really brings out there childness and i think thats cool. The author probably got sidetracked with his kids if he has any when he was writing this book.

One of the chapters that i really liked was the chapter on page 15 when she meats the tiger because i really like tigers and because she go so close and i thought that was very cool. I really think that eve should have been a little smarter in the beginning though. Adamn too because eve was smarter than him. How can you not tell distance? That just baffled me. Well i think the book was okay but could have been alot better and more interesting.

This book was short and is worth a look. I dont know why they are so dumb but it gave the book comedy so i give ir 3 stars out of 5.
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