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Everything Must Go [MINIDISC]


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Music

Image of album by Manic Street Preachers

Photos

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Videos

James Dean Bradfield on Postcards from a Young Man

Biography

“The secret of life is to have a task, something you devote your entire life to, something you bring everything to, every minute of the day for your whole life. And the most important thing is—it must be something you cannot possibly do.” (Henry Moore)

Most bands don’t get to their tenth album. Mercifully. By then, the youthful brio, the wit, the desire, ... Read more in Amazon's Manic Street Preachers Store

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Product details

  • Mini-Disc (10 Dec. 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B00004Y3GY
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 535,427 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Sept. 2000
Format: Audio CD
This is quite simply an outstanding album! And possibly the only album I own which doesn't have a single bad track! Even the Beatles "Sergeant Pepper..." and other classics have one or two less succesful songs - not so "Everything must go". "Design for Life" and "No surface all feeling" are classics. Though, to be fair, every track is a classic in it's own way. The lyrics may be dark - but they are to the point and oh-so-powerful. eg. "I look to the future, it makes me cry." The album as a whole, however, really is not depressing. It's an exhibition of pure rock genius! Simply superb.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "suck_a_lemon" on 25 Aug. 2001
Format: Audio CD
The first word that comes into your mind when listening to this is "Dignity". How a band could lose such an integral member (let's face it, Richey was slightly more important than just rhythm "guitarist"/lyricist) and not fall down on their arses under the weight of rumour, gossip and despair is truly remarkable. This album would be remarkable if it were made at any point in time but it just takes on so many layers of poignancy if you look at their history.
There is a gorgeous mixture of introspection and life-affirming tunes on this album. The most crucial line comes on the best song, Enola/Alone: "All I wanna do is live, no matter how miserable it is". Amidst the beautiful minor chord crunch that accompanies it, it's easy to get swept away in the emotion that you feel Nicky must have felt during the abyss of '95. No Surface All Feeling is in a similar vein with very calming vocals and it's a great sign-off, thought-provoking, sad, hopeful - even though it was written pre-disappearance. Also, the two understated and lovely acoustic numbers, Small Black Flowers That Grow In The Sky and Removables, are sparse and delicate gems. Two fantastic Richey lyrics accompanied first by a harp driven and morose melody and then a more cynical Nirvana Unplugged-style acoustic strum.
I would be hard pushed to point out any weak moments. Australia is the only song that lacks the mellow, bittersweet alter-ego of all Manics' songs with a lot of light but a disappointing amount of shade. Everything Must Go treads a thin line between epic and emotionless but just comes out on the right side.
This is the sound of a heart beating, despite tragedy, despite disaster and amazed and grateful to be alive despite all the odds.
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By B. Browning on 6 Sept. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Yep this is a good solid album and a great antidote to the bottomless pit the Manics likely found themselves in before and after Richey's disappearance.

Its been said countless times before by every reviewer, but to come back from that place, the Holy Bible this-is-how-it-is mindset, must've been incredibly difficult, especially without your best mate. Anyway, what do I know. The songs...

Well, there are plenty of good 'uns here. "Design for life" was overplayed, and to be honest I usually skip that one when listening to the album all the way through. It's a great tune though and -despite the lager-boy football terrace leanings- it was, and is, a very lyrically intelligent and musically exciting tune.

"Elvis impersonator" is a good opener, atmospheric samples and nice chord progressions, slightly desperate and tragi-comic imagery from the lyrics. "Enola/Alone" has oasis-style open chords and to be honest I wasn't convinced when I first heard it and wasn't sure how to take the sentimentality, but hey, it wasn't my mate that disappeared.

"Small black flowers.." Is desperately sad, despite a slightly cliche subject area. It is a pretty tune and always conjures up sad imagery when I hear it. The title track and Australia are OK - again they've been overplayed, but they are good pop-rock tunes.

"Interiors" is great, musically it is quite interesting with that staggered drum beat and nice guitar sound running through it. I'd never heard of Willem De Kooning but it was an enjoyable tune. "Further Away" and "No surface.." are good closing tracks.

A slow-burner but hats off to the Manics for such an achievement in the face of such adversity
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Format: Audio CD
'Everything Must Go' is a classic rock album that has lasted the test of time.

There are no weak tracks on this album in my opinion. From start to finish this album is energetic, fierce and very emotional...from "Elvis Impersonator: Blackpool Pier" to "No Surface All Feeling" this album keeps you on the edge of your seat.

After the masterpiece that was 'The Holy Bible' the Manics take on a different sound, perhaps similar to their second album 'Gold Against The Soul'. They take on a more poppy sound but still manage to inject the right amount of rock in this record.

One of many highlights on this album is "Enola/Alone", a song inspired merely by a photograph of the band and their management. It's a classic rock song with fantastic guitar playing and an astounding vocal performance. Another highlight would be "No Surface All Feeling" which has Richey Edwards playing guitar on the solo section. It's a lovely, beautiful song that once again has great guitar playing and a fantastic vocal performance.

I would advise everybody to buy a copy of this great album...Manics fan or not.
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