Everyday 2013

Amazon Instant Video

(13)
Available in HD

This potent film from Michael Winterbottom (The Trip, 24 Hour Party People, A Cock and Bull Story) is a story of a family apart and the celebration of the small pleasures of everyday life.

Starring:
Katrina Kirk, Darren Tighe
Runtime:
1 hour 26 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices

Everyday

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Michael Winterbottom
Starring Katrina Kirk, Darren Tighe
Supporting actors Stephanie Kirk, Shaun Kirk, John Simm, Robert Kirk, Shirley Henderson
Studio Soda Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By E. JACKSON on 18 Nov 2012
Format: DVD
A spoiler-free review:

I was lucky enough to get a ticket to the première of this film before it aired on Channel 4 last week, and have been hoping that it would be released on DVD. As a cinema feature it was almost overwhelming - on television, it was almost harrowingly intimate, and almost like a docudrama in feel.

As the previous reviewer noted, 'Everyday' really does benefit from having been filmed over five real years - everyone ages and whilst the most notable changes are in the children (the youngest was in nappies when filming began and at school when it finished!)the passing of time is also reflected in the two adult leads - Shirley Henderson stops looking quite so much like a teenager who could almost be an older sibling and more like a lonely and careworn mother; John Simm's hair gets greyer and his face more angular. That the four children were real-life siblings and the filming done in their own home really lends the whole thing such a natural feel that you instantly accept them as a family, and although none of the children had acted before they behave naturally with Shirley as their mum Karen. They also behave with natural shyness and wariness around John's character Ian when they go to visit him in prison (three real prisons were used in filming and many of the extras were real prisoners, the warders real prison employees)and the stilted conversation on both sides just feels so real it makes you want to cry for them all. Ian may not have a lot to say in prison, but his utter desolation as he realises that he is missing his children growing up is always there in every long-distance phone call, every too-short visit, bubbling quietly and desperately under the surface.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By pipnuts on 18 Nov 2012
Format: DVD
The film appears to have been shot in Lincolnshire and Norfolk, much in the Stamford area, and focuses on one family over five years, as they wait for the father to be released from prison. This is not one of those depressing `true life' stories, but is a non-judgemental documentary style piece about a family living with an edge of expectation of what's round the corner, with real life pending for the moment. The film benefits from being shot over five years, as there are no changes of actors as the children age. John Simm and Shirley Henderson are completely believable ordinary parents, and the natural performances of the children, who are real-life siblings, help create the documentary feel.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr David Penn on 9 April 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film wasted the talents of two fine actors in John Simm and Shirley Henderson, relying heavily on scenes of children doing very ordinary things.

We had close-up after close-up of children laughing, crying, chattering, singing, eating, brushing teeth,... well, you get the idea. Basically Michael Winterbottom seems to think that drama can be created by just watching essentially, home videos of children. It can't unless you are the sort of person who oohs and aahs every time a cherubic face appears on TV. Even then, you are likely to get more drama and be more entertained watching a few clips from 'You've Been Framed.'

The dialog was kept to a bare minimum. Indeed it could have been dropped completely and nothing would be lost from the plot, so banal and simple was the script. In fact, much was difficult to hear anyway given the backround noise and score. To be honest, that which was audible wasn't worth the effort of writing or performing anyway.

The only point of the whole film is for us to be taught how terribly sad it is that Dad's in prison and the wife and children have to fend for themselves - but that is about as deep as it gets. Add in a few pretty landscape scenes, a repetitive tune that becomes increasingly irritating and you have perhaps one of the most pointless films ever made. A real pity since the idea of filming the piece over several years allowing the children to age naturally could have made this into a classic had it contained even a shred of real drama.

I hate trashing films, but this one deserves it as I totally wasted my money buying this.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Natasha Martyn-Johns on 20 May 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Winterbottom's films are always semi-documentaries and this is no exception. Shot in real time over five years, it tells the story of one family whose father is in prison, serving a five-year prison sentence. We see the family make the journey to visit him in prison and the struggle to maintain intimacy with his wife and children during that time. Brilliantly cast and acted, it is a very moving and realistic portrayal of a family struggling to stay together under difficult circumstances.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ron on 25 May 2014
Format: DVD
Even though the film became monotonous at 20 minutes in, I continued to watch it because of the positive reviews on Amazon. How wrong I was. It is boring, monotonous and then tedious and finally thoroughly irritation because nothing actually happens. I do however get it ... prison is tedious and monotonous; however unlike the main character YOU have not committed a crime and therefore don't deserve to be punished with a sentence of 90 minutes hard labour. Avoid at all costs.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Effrosyni Moschoudi on 19 May 2014
Format: DVD
I am a huge fan of John Simm and I try to catch up with his work all the way from Greece (where I live) by buying the odd DVD. I came across Everyday and wasn't really sure that it would be my cup of tea. I had the impression it would be depressing, if anything. In the end, I gave it a try and I am delighted that I did. The film was anything BUT depressing. To start with, the fact that it was filmed over a number of years, added to the believability factor of this amazing family story, watching as the children grew up over time. It was an amazing trick by the creators that by the end of the movie, made the spectator feel like part of the family too. And how can you not feel involved? Filmed in a 'fly on the wall documentary' kind of way, with the camera work making it look like a home movie in other places, you couldn't help but get reeled in, mesmerized. During intimate scenes, it almost felt like voyerism between two real people; I was THAT involved in this incredibly realistic and moving family tale. I can't think of another movie that ever made me feel so emotionally involved. For one, I laughed and went 'aawww' to watch the kiddies during their antiques or silly emotional moments. But most of all, I felt appalled at the inhumane prison system that won't grant a couple some intimacy over the years. No matter the crime, surely, one should not deprive two people who have children and a home together this sacred right. In this sense, whatever can follow as a result to real people's lives out there is of no surprise at all. I think if anything, the film's mission was to highlight that and the unfair impact this can have on people's lives. This movie left me with a plelthora of feelings but most of all, it left me with the feelings of joy and relief that this family, somehow, made it.Read more ›
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