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Everybody Has A Plan [DVD]

Viggo Mortensen , Soledad Villamil , Ana Piterbarg    Suitable for 15 years and over   DVD
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £4.39 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Product details

  • Actors: Viggo Mortensen, Soledad Villamil, Sofia Gala, Daniel Fanego, Javier Godino
  • Directors: Ana Piterbarg
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: Spanish
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Metrodome Distribution
  • DVD Release Date: 23 Sep 2013
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00DUFBNSK
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 38,307 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Spanish-language drama starring Viggo Mortensen as a man who swaps identities with his twin brother. Agustin (Mortensen) appears, from the outside, to have an almost perfect life. Married to the beautiful Claudia (Soledad Villamil), he has a well-paid job as a paediatrician and lives in a pleasant Buenos Aires home. However, the arrival of his brother Pedro (also played by Mortensen) coincides with a period of personal crisis for Agustin. When Pedro reveals that he is suffering from terminal lung cancer, Agustin sees an opportunity to start a new life. Switching identities with his brother, he returns to the Tiger Delta region he grew up in and a simpler, if far from straightforward existence. There are difficulties when he discovers that Pedro is in trouble with a local criminal group, but hope in the form of his fledgling relationship with Rosa (Sofia Gala)...

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4.2 out of 5 stars
4.2 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No good deed goes unpunished 30 Jun 2013
By Rowena Hoseason HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
Fans of Viggo Mortensen will adore this brooding, tangled, slow-burn slice of South American noir. He dominates the narrative and the screen for the two-hour running time, playing dual roles as twin brothers going through the ultimate mid-life crisis and catharsis.

The action shifts from the swamps of the Tigre Delta where the brothers grew up, to the slick city of Buenos Aires and back again. The film contrasts the lives, characters and lost opportunities of the pair, who obviously chose different paths when they reached adulthood... but whose destinies seem to be woven together. When Agustín, a city doctor, starts to implode under the weight of his suffocating relationship, his twin brother Pedro pays a surprise visit and provides an escape route alternative existence. It's the ultimate get-out from a stifling life: ditch all responsibilities, flee to the rural badlands and a simple existence of bee-keeping, and return to the log-cabin life of childhood fantasy.
Except it's not that simple... because Pedro is not a moral man. His criminal activities and cronies dominate Agustín's return to the community. Agustín's gentle, thoughtful nature endear him to the young woman who helps tend the bees, but to Pedro's associates who kidnap, brutalise and kill, he is considered a weakling, not a *real* man like his brother.
Mortensen's performances are intense and compelling, crafting two distinct and credible characters with sparse dialogue (spoken in Spanish, subtitled in English). Agustín evolves throughout the film - at first not even wanting to touch his brother's shoes, then reflexively slipping into them when rousted from his bed by the local lawmen.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing Argentinian Film 10 Nov 2013
By Tommy Dooley TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
Viggo Moretensen makes his debut Argentinean film and gets to play twin brothers. The first is Augustin who lives a seemingly charmed life in Buenos Aries; he is a paediatrician and his beautiful wife thinks they have everything except a child to share it with. So she has decided to adopt and is full of the joys of spring at the prospect. Augustin seems to be less exuberant. Then his twin brother turns up after a noted absence. This is black sheep and alleged `bee keeper Pedro also played by Moretensen.

When Pedro reveals that he has terminal cancer it gives Augustin the chance to assume his brothers identity and go back to the rural life of their youth in the Tigre Delta. Once he gets there he finds himself not only attracted to one of the locals but also walking blind into the turmoil of his brothers past criminal activity. It seems he was making more than just honey. That leads to a past where debts are owed and he will have to take on the role of pay master.

So is it any good? Well yes and slightly maybe, Moretensen is always good value and a female supporting cast from Soledad Villamil (`The Secret in their eyes') as his wife and Sofía Gala Castaglione as his Delta island interest both give outstanding performances. Whilst some of the others are not as strong; this is somewhat made up by the excellent direction from Ana Piterbarg in her first time big screen production and the cinematography which captures the stark landscape and atmosphere really well.

It is not a feel good film but one that has a story to tell and it is good to see South America making so many good to excellent films lately of which I feel this is certainly one of the good ones. Presented in Spanish, Argentinean style, with good sub titles and a run time of 113 minutes, this is one to see at least once as the plot developments will mean that a repeat viewing is never going to be as satisfying so maybe consider the rental option as I did.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good foreign film 17 Sep 2014
By LINGO
Format:DVD
Great to see Viggo Mortensen in a challenging role that while some may find dreary and dull, the story is cleverly crafted, and coupled with the great cinematography makes for a compelling movie that does fly by despite its near 2 hour length. Yes you will have to read the subtitles (unless you understand Spanish) but it is worth the effort for what is a good film
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful 30 Jan 2014
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
The dvd arrived delightfully quickly. With a note from the sender inside, and thank you Terry it is wonderful!!! You did a good job there lad! When I put the disc on my big TV I lost the subtitles (must adjust the tv!) but on my PC it is perfect. And a superb film. Viggo of course is out of this world acting. The terror on his face when those kids fought.. and such subtle yet clear differences between he and his brother. Agustin's gentle fear of almost all, and Pedro.. careless of feelings.

A terrific film, with so many moments of sadness/action/pain tempered with understanding. The costumes and props terrific. I'm watching it again right now and there is so MUCH to see inside the film story itself. The subtitles don't detract as there's not a great deal of conversation most of the time, and one can guess what is being said almost from the superb acting.

Viggo is ALWAYS a feast of mind-filling superlatives. The other cast were also so well-set... even the bees! a Wonderful film and thank you Terry!!!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  15 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Trading Places 14 Jun 2013
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
Todos tenemos un plan (Everybody has a plan) is very slow moving Argentinean film written (with Ana Cohan) and directed by Ana Piterbarg. It seems the primary reason for bringing this story to the screen is to make use of the fact that fine actor and star Viggo Mortensen lived in Argentina for ten years, speaks the language fluently, and probably more than any other actor is able to bring off this tale of a man who assumes the identity of his deceased twin. The story jumps all over the place, leaving the audience confused at the events. It is clear that the title of the movie does not relate to the writer director: the grand plan of the film is missing.

The story deals with identical twin brothers whose lives could not be more different: Agustín (played by Mortensen) would appear to have the ideal life. He's a pediatrician with an attractive wife Claudia (Soledad Villamil) living comfortably in Buenos Aires. The couple is in the midst of arranging the adoption of a baby, but the idea of having an infant in the house reminds Augustine that he is not at all comfortable with children, despite his being a successful pediatrician. Agustín reverses his consent at the last minute, and his changed behavior creates a schism that brings to the surface the true sense of lack of fulfilment that Agustín feels with his life. In the midst of a depressive episode Agustín decides to lock himself in a room, Claudia leaves just to retreat from her disappointment and loathing of Agustín. Agustín receives a visit from his estranged twin brother, Pedro (also played by Mortensen), a beekeeper on an island by the river, who reveals he has terminal lung cancer. Pedro asks Agustín to help him die, but when that situation is realized Agustín escapes his obligation-filled existence and assumes his brother's identity, taking up residence in Pedro's rundown shack in Argentina's Tigre Delta island region where the brothers grew up. A romance develops with one of Pedro's much younger bee farm helpers Rosa (Sofía Gala Castaglione), while Agustín becomes caught up in the fallout from Pedro's past criminal affairs with some shady locals: Adrián (Daniel Fanego) is the crime lord responsible for a death and for gambling problems Pedro had and Rubén (Javier Godino) is caught up in the confusion. How the story ends is fragmented and somewhat unsatisfying.

Mortensen capably pulls of the difference in the twins and the similarities that arise when he assumes the identity of the deceased Pedro. The cast is very fine, the mood is unrelentingly dark, and the story resembles Swiss cheese - great flavor but far too many holes. Grady Harp, June 13
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No good deed goes unpunished 30 Jun 2013
By Rowena Hoseason - Published on Amazon.com
Fans of Viggo Mortensen will adore this brooding, tangled, slow-burn slice of South American noir. He dominates the narrative and the screen for the two-hour running time, playing dual roles as twin brothers going through the ultimate mid-life crisis and catharsis.

The action shifts from the swamps of the Tigre Delta where the brothers grew up, to the slick city of Buenos Aires and back again. The film contrasts the lives, characters and lost opportunities of the pair, who obviously chose different paths when they reached adulthood... but whose destinies seem to be woven together. When Agustín, a city doctor, starts to implode under the weight of his suffocating relationship, his twin brother Pedro pays a surprise visit and provides an escape route alternative existence. It's the ultimate get-out from a stifling life: ditch all responsibilities, flee to the rural badlands and a simple existence of bee-keeping, and return to the log-cabin life of childhood fantasy.
Except it's not that simple... because Pedro is not a moral man. His criminal activities and cronies dominate Agustín's return to the community. Agustín's gentle, thoughtful nature endear him to the young woman who helps tend the bees, but to Pedro's associates who kidnap, brutalise and kill, he is considered a weakling, not a *real* man like his brother.
Mortensen's performances are intense and compelling, crafting two distinct and credible characters with sparse dialogue (spoken in Spanish, subtitled in English). Agustín evolves throughout the film - at first not even wanting to touch his brother's shoes, then reflexively slipping into them when rousted from his bed by the local lawmen.
The supporting cast are equally well-chosen; watch the scene with Agustín and his wife visiting the baby in hospital to observe her intense need to adopt the child and his utter ambivalence to the situation - revealed not in words but in their contrasting physical performances.
The photography in the backwaters is equally impressive, reflecting the film's oppressive, twisted atmosphere in moments of visual clarity. A house on stilts blazes against the night sky; a lonely, battered boat weaves through the convoluted river. But always the camera returns to the focus of the film, and the inevitable confrontation which arises when two such similar men attempt to occupy the same space and time.

Don't expect Hollywood-style shoot-outs, or even the kind of slick, happy-go-lucky swamplife as featured in Beasts of the Southern Wild [DVD]. 'Everybody Has A Plan' is much more gritty and grim; it has moments of redemption but these only serve to accentuate the relentless awfulness of the inevitable outcome. Not everybody in this film has a plan, and they certainly can't escape the reality of who they are.
9/10
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Argentinean Tale of Desertion, Love and Familial Criminality. 10 Nov 2013
By Tommy Dooley - Published on Amazon.com
Viggo Moretensen makes his debut Argentinean film and gets to play twin brothers. The first is Augustin who lives a seemingly charmed life in Buenos Aries; he is a paediatrician and his beautiful wife thinks they have everything except a child to share it with. So she has decided to adopt and is full of the joys of spring at the prospect. Augustin seems to be less exuberant. Then his twin brother turns up after a noted absence. This is black sheep and alleged ‘bee keeper Pedro also played by Moretensen.

When Pedro reveals that he has terminal cancer it gives Augustin the chance to assume his brothers identity and go back to the rural life of their youth in the Tigre Delta. Once he gets there he finds himself not only attracted to one of the locals but also walking blind into the turmoil of his brothers past criminal activity. It seems he was making more than just honey. That leads to a past where debts are owed and he will have to take on the role of pay master.

So is it any good? Well yes and slightly maybe, Moretensen is always good value and a female supporting cast from Soledad Villamil (‘The Secret in their eyes’) as his wife and Sofía Gala Castaglione as his Delta island interest both give outstanding performances. Whilst some of the others are not as strong; this is somewhat made up by the excellent direction from Ana Piterbarg in her first time big screen production and the cinematography which captures the stark landscape and atmosphere really well.

It is not a feel good film but one that has a story to tell and it is good to see South America making so many good to excellent films lately of which I feel this is certainly one of the good ones. Presented in Spanish, Argentinean style, with good sub titles and a run time of 113 minutes, this is one to see at least once as the plot developments will mean that a repeat viewing is never going to be as satisfying so maybe consider the rental option as I did.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Viggo in Spanish 20 Aug 2013
By violetcherry - Published on Amazon.com
The most interesting aspect of this story is the pacing and Viggo Mortensen's performance, which utilizes his nearly flawless Spanish. I did not care for the relationship with the younger girl; it felt forced, especially for a character who clearly doesn't want much to do with anyone. A very interesting and peculiar film.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Strange, visceral crime thriller that makes good use of a simple story with suspense and intrigue 2 Jun 2013
By Visual Bureau - Published on Amazon.com
"Todos tenemos un plan (Everybody Has a Plan) is one different beast on its own for your modern British cinema. It is in Argentine Spanish, starring Viggo Mortensen speaking Spanish all the way and playing also a doppelganger, it was directed by a woman (Ana Piterbarg), and takes much of its steps to the classic writing styles of a Hitchcock and Polanski film. The story and the way it functioned was more interesting to watch than it being reviewed and noticed from online sources like IMDb. With the free ticket that I had for the film, I chose not to expect anything in particular.

While reviews were particularly mixed to negative on this one (which kind of contradicts the usual opinions that critics have for foreign, high-brow films), Everybody Has a Plan worked well in presenting a rather subtle, mute-paced, and often intense drama about the issues that reside with the high and low-class (Pedro was the fisherman and Agustin was a pediatrician) and how the past affects much of their decisions. It is also a story of correcting much of the wrongs, in this case, through a family member who could have got himself even more entangled with crime and cancer. Mortensen, as usual, provides good performances to characters who are mute and mysterious but have violent and aggressive impulses (think Cronenberg's A History of Violence) as well as Daniel Fanego as a menacing debt collector, pervert, and murderer. In addition, the cinematography and minimalistic soundtrack all create an excellent aura of dread and suspense that shimmers higher than the glossy, quite similar findings in the recent Girl with the Dragon Tattoo film adaptations.

The film, like how the reviews put it, does suffer from being a bit too vague and simple at parts and can come across as being a bit by-the-book. But then again, this was not really much of a concern considering my low knowledge of how it would turn out. Still, if you feel someone that appeals to emotion, heart, aggression, and mystery with a dash of culture, why not give this one a try."
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