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Everybody Digs Bill Evans
 
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Everybody Digs Bill Evans

1 Jan 2010 | Format: MP3

£4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:48
30
2
6:26
30
3
3:58
30
4
8:17
30
5
0:46
30
6
3:50
30
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7:12
30
8
5:18
30
9
5:18


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan 2010
  • Label: Hallmark
  • Total Length: 46:53
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00490NLGC
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 126,651 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Adam Ventress VINE VOICE on 20 Oct 2001
Format: Audio CD
This album,only Evans' second under his own name was recorded shortly before the historic Kind of Blue sessions with Miles Davis et al, and Evans' approach is quite similar on the two records.
His playing is spacious and delicate, and he is well backed by Sam Jones and Paul Motian. 'Minority' and 'Night and Day' are excellent swinging, uptempo performances, with Evans sounding confident and assured with his choice of material, while his playing on 'Young and Foolish', 'Lucky to be Me' and his own atmospheric composition,'Peace Piece' is hypnotically beautiful.
For all the brilliance of his trio records with Motian and Scott Lefaro which followed and his later solo recordings, this is for me his finest hour. Any Bill Evans fan will probably already have this, but for newcomers this is an ideal place to start.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Dec 2001
Format: Audio CD
This is a great album, yet it follows basically the pattern of what everybody else was doing - driving bass and drums, with the pianist being the star. This isn't not neccessarily a bad thing, but considering that Evans went on to become one of the great innovators in the jazz trio medium, it is fairly ordinary.
There are some great tracks on it. "Night and Day", "Minority" and "Peace Piece" stand out, the latter especially displaying Bill's legendary crystal touch and feeling, which he was to become known for in later years.
Some excellent driving jazz is featured on this record, and it is a good one to have in your collection, but just you wait until later on!!!
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By MikeG on 26 Jan 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is an important Bill Evans album, only the second one under his own name and containing the Evans classic: "Peace Piece". It preceded by a few months the session which produced Kind of Blue - a seminal Miles Davis album in whose music Evans himself was of major significance. It was to be followed by a long series of albums in which Evans transformed the nature of the jazz piano trio, making the pianist, bassist and drummer more a partnership of improvising equals. On Everybody Digs... the roles of bassist and drummer are still the conventional ones of accompanists to the pianist as leader and "star soloist". But the key elements of Evans's musical personality were already in place and it was obvious that his was an important and individual new voice in jazz pianism. The faster pieces such as "Night and Day" and "Oleo" carry echoes of be-bop (emphasised by the driving, intense drumming) and of the cerebral piano style of Lennie Tristano; but they already show a significant development beyond these influences. Evans's invigorating "swing" and rhythmic precision at this kind of tempo was to remain a key aspect of his music; but so was the more elegant and exploratory mid-tempo playing on a piece such as "Tenderly", played as a jazz waltz (another type of piece which was to remain a staple of Evans's music).
But the other key aspect of his music which was to be of key importance was his work on slow ballads. To these he brought a combination of qualities which took jazz piano ballad playing beyond the rather florid, "cocktail lounge" style.
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