Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

See Wishlist
Every Picture Tells A Story
 
See larger image
 

Every Picture Tells A Story

7 Feb 2014 | Format: MP3

4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 6.32 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:59
30
2
4:02
30
3
6:00
30
4
3:48
30
5
5:50
30
6
5:36
30
7
5:23
30
8
4:10


Product details

  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 1971 The Island Def Jam Music Group
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 40:48
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KUHFK2
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,464 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
45
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 46 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 April 2001
Format: Audio CD
The impact made by Rod Stewart on the music scene of 1971 should never be underestimated. When "Maggie May" rang out from radios all across the world you just knew that something special had happened. For those of us too young and unaware at that point of "An Old Raincoat Won't Ever Let You Down","Gasoline Alley" or work with the Faces and Jeff Beck Group, the voice of Rod Stewart rang straight and true. It spoke to you and for you. It was a voice of integrity. You knew Rod and he knew you. Here was a translator of songs who made them his own ("Seems Like A Long Time", "(I Know) I'm Losing You", "Reason To Believe"); a creator of songs to rank with the most critically aclaimed ("Every Picture Tells A Story", "Maggie May","Mandolin Wind") and here was an album so perfectly crafted that all these years on, you would not even want to imagine changes. Rod at the height of his abilities, with all components (and Ronnie Wood!) in place. There is no question that Rod Stewart should be recognised as one of the greatest vocalists ever recorded, if only on the basis of this one album - but what an album! Look at the front cover, it states "Classic Edition" and "Every Picture Tells A Story" was, is and always will be. Buy it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A. Macfarlane VINE VOICE on 23 April 2004
Format: Audio CD
OK everyone knows Rod Stewart from "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy" and all theother rubbish he's churned out over the last couple of decades. But thisalbum stands out as a reminder that once he really was very good. Thetrack most will know is "Maggie May", and it is rightfully a classic, butthere are more nearly forgotten gems here: the title track, a reworking ofDylan's "Tomorrow Is A Long Time" and the rawkous "(I know)I'm Losing" youin particular. This album is full of great tunes, a laid back style andsome decent song writing. What's even more surprising is that Stewarthimself was involved in the writing of them.
It makes you wonder what happened to him between the early albums and suchabominations as the 80s ablums "Foolish Behaviour", "Body Wishes","Camouflage" and "Love Touch". You should get a copy of "Every PictureTells a Story", listen to it and enjoy it. But if anyone ever offers you acopy of 1986's "Rod Stewart" - run screaming.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By alfredo on 20 Jan 2000
Format: Audio CD
Forget all that nonsense he did in the late Seventies and early Eighties, this is Rod's finest forty-odd minutes.
He takes on Blues, Folk, Rock 'n' Roll and Soul with the best and most enthusiastic pick-up band you could ever wish for.
This album comes from the time when he actually enjoyed making records - from the plaintive 'Mandolin Wind' to the hard-driven 'Losing You', you'll never hear him in better voice.
I just wish he'd ring Ronnie Wood and Martin Quittenton, book a cheap studio and do it all again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Docendo Discimus TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 30 Sep 2003
Format: Audio CD
"Every Picture Tells A Story" is Rod Stewart's masterpiece.
Without greatly altering his approach, he perfected his blend of hard rock, folk, blues, and country on this his very best record.
The band rocks, particularly on the Temptations cover "(I Know I'm) Losing You" and the acoustic title track, but the great triumph of "Every Picture Tells A Story" lies in its content.
Every song on this CD, whether it's a cover or original, is a gem, from the album's classic centerpiece "Maggie May" to the witty title track and the poignant "Mandolin Wind".
And the covers, including definitive readings of Dylan's "Tomorrow Is Such A Long Time" and Tim Hardin's "Reason to Believe," as well as a rollicking "That's All Right," are equally terrific, bringing new dimension to each and every one of the songs.
The sound is great, the arrangements are superb, and Stewart's vocals are rough but supremely soulful.
"Every Picture Tells A Story" is a beautiful album, one that has the timeless qualities of the best folk, yet one that rocks harder than most pop music...few rock records are quite this powerful or this rich.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Pieter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Sep 2000
Format: Audio CD
If Rod Stewart had carried on in this vein, he would have been bigger than Elvis now and with his credibility intact, like Springsteen, Tom Waits and the Rolling Stones. These songs are real gems, from the hard rocking Maggie May, Reason To Believe and That's Alright to the more folky numbers like Tomorrow Is A Long Time, Seems Like A Long Time and the deliciously sad but uplifting Mandolin Wind. A perfect blend of superb material and passionate delivery make this a classic rock album.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Feb 2003
Format: Audio CD
If you could only have one Rod Stewart album, this would be the one to have. It is quintessential Rod Stewart: brash and raucous one minute, poignant and mournful another.
This CD contains some terrific songs, and they run the gamut in feeling from the folksy "Maggie May" to the lyrical" Mandolin Wind" to the pure, Motown/rock refrains of "I'm Losing You". It also contains one of the greatest songs ever written by Tim Hardin, "Reason To Believe". As sung by Rod Stewart that alone, in and of itself, is reason enough to have this CD.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By SMc on 5 Nov 2011
Format: Audio CD
It's forty years to the very month (November 1971/2011) since I purchased first of all the double A-sided single "Maggie May/Reason To Believe" and then graduated to the full vinyl album "Every Picture Tells A Story". The album's front cover informs the listener of the singer's name, the album's title and the legend "Classic Edition" at the very top. Without doubt, the 'legend' is true. This was the first album I ever bought with my own money (as far as I recall) and though I'd grown up with the radio (The Light Programme but, mainly Radio Luxembourg) and both my mother's (Donegan, Darin et al) records and my elder brother's (Beatles, Stones, Small Faces and Who) records over the previous ten years or so, this album was a revelation to me at the time. What? Classical guitars with electric and acoustic guitars, mandolins, violins, pianos, organs and pedal steel guitars? It was new to me at the time anyway! Moreover, Stewart can be satisfied that he was one of the pioneers of 'acoustic rock' and helped create a 'template' for many others to follow.

Unknown to me (and I suspect many others at the time too) Stewart had already made two very good solo albums prior to this, made two 'band' albums with the Jeff Beck Band as well as numerous singles from 1964 leading up to this masterpiece, comprising mainly stunning covers of fairly obscure songs by Bob Dylan, Tim Hardin, Elvis/Arthur Crudup and The Temptations. Oh and three Stewart originals, one a solo "Mandolin Wind", one with Ronnie Wood "Every Picture Tells A Story" and one with Martin Quittenton, a little 'throwaway song, called "Maggie May".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?