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Every Nation for Itself: Winners and Losers in a G-Zero World Paperback – 3 May 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Portfolio Penguin (3 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670921041
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670921041
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 1.7 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 566,770 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ian Bremmer is the founder and president of Eurasia Group, the leading global political risk research and consulting firm. The company provides financial, corporate, and government clients with information and insight on how political developments move markets.

Bremmer created Wall Street's first global political risk index, and has authored several books, including Every Nation for Itself: Winners and Losers in a G-Zero World, which details risks and opportunities in a world without global leadership. He also wrote the national bestseller, The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?, and The J Curve: A New Way to Understand Why Nations Rise and Fall, which was selected by The Economist as one of the best books of 2006. Bremmer is a contributor for the Financial Times A-List and Reuters.com, and writes "The Call" blog on ForeignPolicy.com. Bremmer has a PhD in political science from Stanford University (1994), and he presently teaches at Columbia University. His analysis focuses on global macro political trends and emerging markets, which he defines as "those countries where politics matter at least as much as economics for market outcomes."

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Review

An author who is always full of insights (George Osborne)

Provocative ... a rising guru (The Economist)

One of the preeminent political analysts of our time (Nouriel Roubini)

Smart and snappy ... provides the most cogent prediction of how the politics of a post-America world will play out. (New Statesman)

A prodigy in the US global commentariat. Mr Bremmer's rehearsal of the consequences should make us all wise up (Financial Times)

A fresh perspective ... an exciting contribution to the galaxy of big ideas on international affairs (Huffington Post)

About the Author

Ian Bremmer is the president of the world's leading global political risk research and consulting firm, Eurasia Group. He has written for the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Newsweek, and Harvard Business Review. His six books include The J Curve and The End Of The Free Market.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Hardy on 4 Feb 2014
Format: Paperback
Easily the best current critique of international politics.
Some say that it comes from a pro-american standpoint. This is in my opinion unfair, it analyses America's role as a declinging global hegemon and as such is rather balanced in it's view.

I have worn this book out by how much I have read it.
If you are a politics or IR student, you will find no better book to explain the world as it is and the struggles it will soon face.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By marco polo on 19 Jun 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Enjoyed the book very much by this author. Initially you find yourself wading through (in fine detail many examples of the greatness of the US and it's graceful input to the world) which seemed to be falling apart at the edges until the 'great ole US of A stepped in' and solved everybody's problems....hmm? Once you have managed to escape from the swamp of American greatness, the book does have many positive points, as well as being difficult to put down! Slightly hypocritical from me, is the fact that the author 'does' offer much in the way of criticism of the US and it's ability to make a number of fundamental errors in its International Relations on more than one occasion over the years. It is a very easy read which is a big plus point, I am relatively new to Global Politics but this was a great all-rounder which incorporates the world as a whole both good and bad, inclusive of its lack of real leadership. It does leave the reader with a serious after thought, the author is correct to suggest that collaboration is very much needed in order to try and rectify the many serious issues that we may be faced with in the not too distant future. Having just read "Global Politics" by Andrew Heywood this is a much nicer and easier to understand read I can assure you. I look forward to reading further literature from this author. Highly recommended for students reading politics or international security.
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Format: Paperback
This is a book on the power dynamics of nation states: international relations that are red in tooth and claw.

It purges itself of any sense of wishful thinking that sometimes creates a too rosy global image to instead portrait a world of competing entities which would be familiar to Bismark. The author's central premise is that a world that lacks a centralising presence that the US played, Pax America, will be inherently more unstable. This will then make it more difficult to achieve consensus on issues such as climate change or the threat of cyber-terrorism.
However, it is not a wholly bleak picture. Some BRIC nations might be able to step up to achieve some forms of regional hegemony, eg China or Turkey, to maintain their trade & local influence.Furthermore the demise of a superpower such as the U.S. is less likely that a modest retrenchment as its military reach is still unsurpassed.
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By Andrew Makatrewicz on 18 Nov 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The guy is a guru in political consulting
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 16 May 2012
Format: Paperback
The debate over America's role in the world has only become more contorted as the 2012 presidential election cycle warms up. Frequently, and to deafening applause, Republican audiences would cheer whichever candidate made a point of applauding the permanent fixture of Pax Americana on the international stage. Ian Bremmer's new book addresses the insecurity that this nativism appeals to: how will China's rise affect the international order?

We've become used to an order where the Washington Consensus, the free market, and the reliance on post-World War II institutions (i.e. Bretton Woods institutions) were accepted, nay encouraged. A new order, which Bremmer detailed in his last book, The End of the Free Market, looks at how these neo-corporatist states look at the global stage. Bremmer's new book, Ever Nation for Itself (ENFI), ruthlessly exposes the perspective that Beijing, and other emerging nations, are surveying the world with. The emerging markets, ever the misnomer, have created an entire ecosystem of self-sustaining FDI until we saw the destruction (creative?) of the 2008 economic crisis. Brazil, perhaps learning its lessons from the E.Asian crisis of 1997-98, decided to throw up capital barriers to divestment and others flew the economically illiterate flag of protectionism. These were the opening salvos of a post-G20 world, which this book appropriately names "G-zero."

Overall, we are all going to do OK - if we're to believe Bremmer, which I think we should. As someone who has covered the global political economy for more than 15 years his insight is worth more than most. A recent article in the New York Review of Books by Benjamin Friedman (Whither China?) explores this idea in a more academic lens.
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