Every Man For Himself and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Every Man For Himself has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Every Man For Himself Paperback – 5 Sep 2002


See all 19 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£1.10 £0.01
£7.19 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Every Man For Himself + The Birthday Boys + An Awfully Big Adventure
Price For All Three: £23.37

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Abacus; New Ed edition (5 Sep 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0349108706
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349108704
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 191,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Amazon Review

After taking on the ill-fated Scott expedition to the South Pole in her previous book, The Birthday Boys, the novelist tackles a much larger 1912 disaster: the sinking of the Titanic. The narrator, a 22-year-old named Morgan, brushes up against real-life victims such as John James Astor early in the voyage, while falling in love with the beautiful and unobtainable Wallis Ellery. The deadly maiden voyage of the world's largest ocean liner becomes a journey of self-discovery in this portentous, postmodern work, short-listed for the 1996 Booker Prize.

Review

Extraordinary... a wholly new and highly individual work of art... beautifully written (INDEPENDENT)

Marvellous... exquisite pacing... stunning descriptions (INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY)

A narrative both sparkling and deep... the cost of raising [the Titanic] is prohibitive; Bainbridge does the next best thing (SUNDAY TIMES)

Bainbridge's masterpiece (EVENING STANDARD)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Phoebus on 7 Jan 2004
Format: Paperback
Whilst I would only give five stars to a handfull of books that I've ever read, this one merits it.

About the Titanic with an ending that could never fail to surprise, it was a riveting read. Bainbridge got beneath the skin of the characters and one felt more present at the scene than watching any film. The remarkable thing about reading it, though, was how it reminded me of Oscar Wilde's works. There really is a quotation to take from every page.
As Hilary Mantel said in the Sunday Times " ... the cost of raising the Titanic is prohibitive: Bainbridge does the next best thing." And it's true! I'm not on commission, I just love the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Eileen Shaw TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 16 Sep 2009
Format: Paperback
Beryl Bainbridge has invented her own writing style - no one else writes with such wit and acuity or with such brevity, which is her watchword. Her elliptical style has an astringency and abruptness (as if she's saying sharply, "Wake up at the back there! I'm not going over this twice!") that makes her unique - if you didn't look at the cover you would still know you were reading a Beryl Bainbridge novel.

At her best she can't be beaten and with this novel we see her emphatically at her best (I would be hard-put to choose an all-time favourite between this and her novel about the Scott voyage to the North Pole, The Birthday Boys).

Tackling the sinking of the Titanic, Bainbridge doesn't hang about - it's more like an extremely bracing march to the park than a voyage across the Atlantic, and perhaps this can be said to be a fault - Beryl, if you're listening, take a breather now and again, please? Characters? Zap, zap, zap. Period detail likewise, and then she might linger over some tiny inconsequentiality (or is it?) while the story rattles along and the characters deepen (keep up at the back there!).

Then, before you know it, it's the denouement and shut the book. One is left gasping, applauding, longing for more, but Beryl's off to her next appointment, or just to dust the buffalo in the hall. The thrill of it is in the particulars - Every Man For Himself is about the sinking of the Titanic, Master Georgie is about the Boer War, An Awfully Big Adventure is about repertory theatre c. 1955. Beryl wears her learning very lightly, but there is perfect period detail, and perfect characterisation, wherever she decides to shine her light. She's been shortlisted for various prizes (three times for the Booker) and won the Whitbread twice and the Guardian Fiction prize once.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Annabel Gaskell VINE VOICE on 11 April 2008
Format: Paperback
This novel is a masterpiece, and infinitely more rewarding than the film 'Titanic' with which it shares its subject matter. The fateful voyage is seen through the eyes of Morgan, a rich, young man related to the owner of the shipping line. Concentrating mainly on the first class passengers, to which set Morgan belongs, it paints a portrait of an insular group with an impressive array of vices. The title of the novel says it all - "Every man for himself" - and there is plenty of selfishness, silliness and snobbery on display here. However Morgan himself is basically a decent young chap, and does his best to look out for his friends as the disaster unfolds its course; will he manage to save himself too? This is not a long novel, nor does it need to be, as every word has its place.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By bookpike on 16 Mar 2006
Format: Paperback
Since you know what's going to happen to the Titanic it seems like madness to write a novel with this sort of backdrop. But Bainbridge is such a clever accomplished writer that she turns this inevitability very distinctly to her advantage. The story is magnetically dragged to it's conclusion by the ships date with destiny and along the way Bainbridge stimulates with writing that is perfection and characters that intrigue.
The pithy insights, the black humour and the spare but accurate descriptions fill her 'tardis' like writing. Bainbridge manages to convey in one sentence what it takes other writers several pages to achieve.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 31 Dec 1998
Format: Paperback
I found this book quite hard to get into - the characters were difficult to get to know and it has an odd structure because every reader will know what happens to the Titanic, so the end is hardly a surprise. However, once I got about half way into it I was totally engrossed. I just felt so shocked that these characters were going to be involved in such a horrible tragedy - the way Bainbridge paces the book towards its conclusion is really clever. It has all the subtlety and humanity that the film Titanic lacked, and without the mawkish sentimentality.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 1 Oct 2007
Format: Paperback
Wonderful book, but don't go expecting a novel about the Titanic. Yes, of course the Titanic features, but it's there as a plot device to expose the attitudes and insecurities of the upper class on board. Just as the iceberg rips through the underside of the ship, so it also rips though the underbelly of society, and for the main character at least the sinking literally washes away the chains of his past. It's all here - repressed sex, unrepressed sex, class divides, the insecurities of the privileged who have never had to work for anything. A satisfying streak of black humour runs through it all too. It's not perfect - the characters of Melchett and Van Hopper for example are pretty interchangeable (maybe that's the point?), but the plot rattles along nicely, without any wasted passages.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback