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Eve: The Burning Life Paperback – 25 Mar 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz; Trade paperback edition (25 Mar 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575090170
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575090170
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.6 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,011,720 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

Revenge on a Galactic scale - the stunning new novel from the EVE universe.

About the Author

Hjalti Daníelsson is CCP's lead narrative creator for the harsh universe of New Eden, the setting for CCP's flagship game, EVE Online. After years working as a Game Master he transitioned to CCP´s creative writing team. Hjalti is the author of more than sixty short stories set in the EVE Online universe, along with various other works including plays and storytelling game fiction. In his spare time he reads as many books as he can and indulges in sports where he tends to get punched in the head.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. Theobald on 12 April 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In a nutshell this book skims across the top of what is a deeply complex Intellectual Property and manages to give a shallow and unbelievable story line.

The story itself has little character development beyond the initial scene setting for the main characters and then tries to encapsulate all the different races and personalities within New Eden and introduce them all. You are lead on a tour around New Eden that is lacking in detail and never really conveys the differences of the races and factions to its fullest.

This then gives you a novel which is lacking in content, implausible with too many "major" players appearing it in and with an ending that I would expect to see in a ten years old first novel akin to the great Bobby Ewing shower moment in Dallas.

As a fan of New Eden this book was very disappointing but if you are new to the universe then this will give you an overview of the politics and factions within New Eden, just don't expect a great novel as well.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Orviss on 31 Jan 2011
Format: Paperback
People are too quick to judge a book, I found that this book gave me a complete different look on the pirate factions, a more in depth look and you see that they aren't just some pirate faction but civilizations. I was completely hooked to this book and I think even if you don't play the game its worth having a read because it really is a great book, I don't want to give away what the story is but this book deserves a lot better rating.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By L. Gonggrijp on 24 Jan 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is placed in the universe of the game Eve Online (PC).
EVE Online is a fascinating science fiction MMO game with enormous depth. It is also legendary in its complexity, user-unfriendliness and lack of documentation, help or manuals.

Unlike the previous book Eve: The Empyrean Age (Gollancz) Hjalti Danielsson does not assume that the reader has any knowledge of the world of EVE, putting him in the difficult position that he will be forced to explain many things about the world of EVE Online as the story progresses. This causes him to alienate both the EVE player readers, as they know all this stuff already, and the non-EVE player readers, who get the feeling they're reading an instruction manual or a history book posing as a novel.
There was only one way Hjalti Danielsson could have made his life any harder, and that is by trying to include most of the major factions in the game in his story, and further increasing the amount of backstory and explanation he has to include.
All of this does not help make for a smoothly runningstor story, as it is constantly being interruped with background story insertions and explanations. This is a common trap for science fiction writers to fall into.

However, Hjalti Danielsson does get serious bonus points for a very unexpected choice of main characters, actually pulling off his goals of including all that stuff while still having a readable story and inserting some nice twists in that story. The story itself remained fairly interesting to the end as the characters were such an unexpected choice.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Story Fanatic on 8 Oct 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I agree with the first reviewer, this was a real let-down after much pre-publishing hype by the makers of the game (CCP) that it is based on (EVE Online).

The Tony Gonzales book The Empyrean Age, set in the same game universe, is a _much_ better read - a totally different quality. I started playing EVE as a result of reading TG's book. If my first introduction to EVE had been The Burning Life, I would (a) probably never bothered finished reading it, and (b) certainly not bothered investigating the game.

Burning Life suffers from trying to cover too much ground (I assume in an attempt to introduce various game content) with thin to non-existent character development. I read to the end only in the hope it would improve, but sadly it didn't.

Play the game (seriously good), but don't bother with this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 11 Mar 2011
Format: Paperback
The Burning Life tells the story of a young fellow called Drem, who's life literally comes crashing down around him as his space colony is attacked by an anonymous and remorseless star warrior. Everybody on the colony dies, except for Drem, who quickly dusts himself down and decides to plot a course for revenge against the genocidal pilot.

Intertwined with all this is the story of Ralea, who's working life involves contracting star warriors to ferry goods between star systems, and blow up the odd space colony should one need eliminating. Ralea is a routine drug abuser and we meet her experiencing a breakdown. She soon goes AWOL and embarks on a journey of self-discovery that eventually crosses with that of Drem.

I liked Ralea. She was flawed, likeable and had a decent sidekick to accompany her. The choices she was confronted by helped her story bounce up and down in generally all the right places, in spite of the contrived tour around a very drab universe. Drem, on the other hand, came across like some whining little brat who seemed to find himself inexplicably in league with a succession of New Eden heavyweights, only chancing across Ralea at the very end, long after I'd frankly stopped caring.

The chief protagonist hardly seemed to have much control of his own destiny, having had to be rescued twice in almost as many chapters. Worse still, he was lead around the universe of New Eden as if being shown around the empty rooms of some faceless corporate HQ by an eager guide who felt the need to explain in great detail how the doors opened and closed. The exposition was well written, often brilliantly so, but so exhaustive in pointless detail as to mire the story, possibly because there wasn't much story to begin with.
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