Trade in your item
Get a £0.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Europe Central Paperback – 2 Jul 2007


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£6.63
Paperback
"Please retry"
£5.00
Paperback, 2 Jul 2007
£7.37

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product details

  • Paperback: 800 pages
  • Publisher: Alma Books (2 July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846880424
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846880421
  • Product Dimensions: 19.4 x 12.8 x 4.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 599,942 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
A squat black telephone, I mean an octopus, the god of our Signal Corps, owns a recess in Berlin (more probably Moscow, which one German general has named the core of the enemy's whole being). Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 2 Feb 2008
Format: Paperback
Where to begin?

This is an enormous, serious novel. If you are interested by the history of the first half of the 20th Century (as I am), a fan of the music of Dimitri Shostakovich (as I am), and a lover of literary fiction (as I am) the this book is tailor-made for you. If you are none of those things, you should perhaps approach with caution.

Vollmann has taken a number of 20th Century lives (notably Shostakovich, the defeated Stalingrad general Paulus, the turncoat Russian Vlasov, the well-intentioned SS man Kurt Gerstein, and many others) and woven them into a fictionalised saga to explore the moral maze of Hitler's and Stalin's Europe.

But this is no airport novel. The writing style changes frequently, sometimes spare and straightforward, sometimes outrageously experimental, echoing the music of Shostakovich whose role - in what Vollmann calls "an imaginary love triangle" - is the heart and soul of the book (access to recordings of the symphonies, the cello sonata and the harrowing 8th quartet is highly recommended as an accompanying "soundtrack").

I find it difficult to find suitable comparisons for this book; what it reminded me of most was not literary, but sonic and visual: the aforementioned Shostakovich music, the films of Tarkovsky, the grainy black-and-white images of the 1970s TV series "The World At War". Whatever one tries to compare it to, there is no denying that this evocation of the Berlin-Moscow nightmare world of the 30s, 40s and 50s is a remarkable achievement by a young(ish) American writer, whose work I will be exploring further.

The word "masterpiece" is undoubtedly over-used, but I feel it is justified here.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Oliver Paz on 11 Mar 2008
Format: Paperback
William Vollmann's EUROPE CENTRAL is quite simply a magnum opus. Utterly brilliant. I would go so far as to say that with it he must go into serious contention for the Nobel Prize. One review in the LA Times compared it to WAR AND PEACE. This is not hyperbole. In fact, Vollmann deliberately and cleverly draws up this comparison in the book himself, without ever saying it. He wants it to be compared. It should be.

What's it about? It's about the conflict between Stalinism and Nazism and the aftermath. The impossible choices that it left people. The bravery and heroism that can exist even in appalling regimes, and among those working for appalling regimes. It's about humanity, and what it's capable of. And if that's enough it's also about the nature of the creative process, how life becomes music, and what akes a work of art.

It's a vast, sprawling, huge work, something to take on a long journey (as I did) to get into it. But it's also hugely readable and gripping. If you could compare it to any author living it would be to Pynchon, but it's much more readable than Pynchon.

In a word, a masterpiece.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Margaret Kelleher on 14 Dec 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is superb. I've read countless WW2 fiction and this one easly comes in my top 5. Similar to Life and Fate (in my opinion this book is just a far better read)as it goes between characters in Russia and Germany.

I can't praise it enough. If you have any interest in WW2 then I promise this will take pride of place on your bookshelf.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Charles Edward Brooks on 6 Sep 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An engrossing novel. The biography of Shostakovich was interesting but perhaps too strongly fictionalized. Sometimes confusing as to just who is narrating.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Omnibus Biscuit on 4 Jan 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The other reviewers were pretty spot on but this only deserves four stars, for me, as it is too long. The editor should have sorted that out but as it stands it goes on forever.

The first half though is stunningly good. The chapters about hitler and paulus especially, the 'sleepwalker' and his downfall are portrayed exellently, entirely convincing and even scary.

Read this. Then go and read life and fate by Vassily Grossmann.

O.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search

Look for similar items by category


Feedback