See Wishlist
Ether Song [Explicit]
 
See larger image
 

Ether Song [Explicit]

15 Aug 2005 | Format: MP3

8.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:42
30
2
2:43
30
3
4:27
30
4
4:23
30
5
3:30
30
6
4:05
30
7
3:52
30
8
3:55
30
9
4:40
30
10
2:29
30
11
5:32
30
12
4:05
30
13
7:32
30
14
3:59
30
15
4:09

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 15 Aug 2005
  • Release Date: 15 Aug 2005
  • Label: Source UK
  • Copyright: (C) 2003 Mawlaw 388 Ltd T/A Source UKThis label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved.(C) 2003 EMI Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:03:03
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B001J8XLD0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 85,154 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 22 Jan 2006
Format: Audio CD
Turin Brakes is one of those excellent British bands that hasn't gotten much attention in the American mainstream yet, along with the guys in South, Elbow and Mercury Rev. And after their shimmery space-folk album "Ether Song," their second, we can see that this is totally undeserved.
A spacey organ buildup, a trippy beat and a folky guitar open the first song, "Blue Hour." This song sets the tone for the rest of the album, with its mix of spacey shoegazer and folk-rock, set to angsty lyrics about "let the sun be done/let the air wash the city clean." It's one of those songs that gets deeper and more layered the more you listen to it.
But the album really catches your attention with the soft, rising "Long Distance," which is the softest song that Muse never wrote. And in some songs like "Self Help" and "Panic Attack," the boys eschew the spacepop angle in favor of some mild spacerock. Nothing too hard, just a ringing electric guitar that weaves into the music seamlessly.
With those new additions, it's obvious that Turin Brakes is trying out new things, rather than sticking slavishly to what got them famous in the first place. The only flaw is that they seem a bit undecided what direction to take, and so "Ether Song" feels a bit unguided. But it's somehow pleasant to hear Ollie Knights singing in his slightly wobbly voice, "Remind myself that I'm not just in it for the money." Refreshing.
This U.K. duo started off with acoustic guitar, bass and drums, augmented by some low-key keyboard that adds a delicate edge to otherwise ordinary rock instrumentation. And in "Ether Song," Knights and multitalented bandmate Gale Paridjanian are experimenting with a less folk, more rock sound.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search

Look for similar items by category