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Escape From Tomorrow [DVD]


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Product details

  • Actors: Roy Abramsohn, Elena Schuber, Katelynn Rodriguez
  • Directors: Randy Moore
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: House
  • DVD Release Date: 20 Oct. 2014
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • ASIN: B00IZKAR6O
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 68,335 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

In this black comedy, Jim is an unsatisfied middle aged man on vacation with his family at Disney World. While his family frolics through the park and is enthralled with the sights and sounds of Disney, Jim is busy following two French women he lusts for. The park environment soon turns to something more sinister as Jim discovers. Jim must protect his adventurous kids, angry and suspicious wife, and defend himself against the happiest place on Earth.

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Roochak TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 12 May 2014
Format: DVD
A dark fantasy/science fiction hybrid that takes an intriguing premise and goes nowhere with it, ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW isn't much of a movie, but it's a great example of how a guerilla filmmaker can buck the system through sheer force of will.

The story of a guy with a troubled marriage who takes his family to Walt Disney World and loses his mind there could've been hilarious and/or horrifying. In this case, it's neither -- the film aims for a rococo David Lynch surrealism and misses by a country mile. What is the protagonist, Jim White's, connection to Epcot Center? Who is that little girl with the wicked witch? What the hell is "cat flu?" Why do I get the feeling that every plot twist is being thrown at the viewer as if it had been thought up on the day it was filmed?

I like the cinematography, and the faux-Disney musical score. Question is, will Randy Moore's next movie be one I'll want to watch more than once?
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 137 reviews
31 of 37 people found the following review helpful
A lot better than some make it out to be, if you actually realize what you are getting into. 16 Nov. 2013
By Audio - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This certainly isn't a film for everyone, but it's really more of an abstract piece than a narrative. For those that don't know about how the film was made, much of the footage was taken "under cover" at Walt Disney World and at Disneyland, including on actual rides. Just the fact that they were able to do this without Disney catching them is extraordinary when they had to do many takes of each scene, particularly on the rides (you will never see "It's A Small World" the same again!). It's also amazing that they were able to get this kind of image quality and look using nothing but natural lighting - anyone who knows anything about video can tell you that this is extremely difficult and admirable.

If you appreciate the Disney parks and have a quirky sense of humor, and appreciate more avant-garde film, it's a fun and interesting film. If you are looking for some Hollywood made horror film, you won't see it. Honestly, if you like the parks, just the neat park footage and again, particularly the on-ride footage (Snow White, Big Thunder, Mexico's boat ride, and Small World), is a treat - and the effects in "It's A Small World" finally make it the creepy ride we all know it really is, LOL. The amount of inside jokes and clever inserts (people on dang go-carts plowing through people in the park, what's really under Spaceship Earth, etc.) really make a big Disney park freak get a little extra, too.

This is a decisive film, either you get it, or you don't, either it's for you, or it isn't - it was for me, I really enjoyed it - and will definitely watch it again and show it to friends. Go in with realistic expectations and a love of avant-garde cinema, and it's a curious film to watch which I really don't regret purchasing. You may wish to rent instead if you aren't sure, but if I had just rented it I would have come back to buy it after because it really is very clever.
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW proves to be a colossal disappointment 2 Nov. 2013
By Steven Adam Renkovish - Published on Amazon.com
Director Randy Moore filmed Escape from Tomorrow entirely at the Disney World and Disneyland theme parks. As he did not have permission to do so, he used meticulously planned guerrilla tactics in order to shoot the film without being caught. The actors kept the script on their iPhones. The crew used handheld cameras and dressed as park visitors. Scenes were blocked and rehearsed several times in hotel rooms before shooting, and dialogue was recorded using digital devices which were taped to the actors. The film was also shot in monochrome, in order to avoid lighting issues. No one ever suspected the cast or crew of foul play. In this respect, Escape from Tomorrow is an incredibly risky one of a kind achievement. Randy Moore was afraid that Disney would find out about his little experiment, and so he edited the film in South Korea. The film was released at Sundance, and word of mouth spread quickly.

Ultimately, the unorthodox history behind the making of the film would prove to be far interesting than the film itself.
Escape from Tomorrow tells the story of Jim White, who finds out that he has lost his job on the last day of his family vacation at Disney World. He decides to keep it to himself, so that his wife, his son, and daughter can have a fun time without all of the drama. As he and his family ride the monorail to the park, Jim catches sight of two young Parisian girls – two little Lolita’s that he will soon become obsessed with. Make no mistake, Jim is a disturbed man. While riding the “Small World” attraction, Jim begins to hallucinate. The cherub-faced animatronics begin to grow fangs, smiling evilly at Jim as he passes by. Later, Jim catches sight of the Parisian girls once again, and follows them to Space Mountain, where he forces his son to ride. After the kid gets motion sickness, Jim’s wife chastises him, and she takes the boy back to the hotel to recover. Jim takes his daughter to the Magic Kingdom, where the son of a creepy wheel-chair bound man pushes her to the ground, scraping her knee. Jim takes her to the nurse, who seems to be a bit disturbed and warns Jim of a mysterious “cat flu” that is going around the park. “You can be a host and not even know it,” she says.

For the rest of the day, Jim will continue to follow the Parisian girls, he will fall under the spell of an ex-Disney princess who is now an evil queen, and he will learn that the majority of the ever-smiling Disney Princesses at the park are actually expensive hookers who sell themselves to rich Japanese businessmen, while also becoming the target of an evil plot at Epcot’s Spaceship Earth which will purge him of his vivid imagination. Hallucinatory images are sprinkled throughout to give the film a surreal Lynchian feel, but these moments are fleeting – which is upsetting, because these are perhaps the most involving sequences in the film, as the bulk of the running time is dedicated to Jim’s tireless pursuit of those darned Parisian girls. These scenes are repetitive and dull – and honestly, Jim is a poorly written character. After a while, I was ready to get away from him.

And then there’s the “cat flu” sequence, which brought back memories of a certain toilet scene from Dumb and Dumber. After a few more slightly trippy scenes, the film ends in a bizarre fashion that doesn’t quite work, not even in the realm of avant-garde cinema. The trailer for Escape from Tomorrow would have you believe that this is one of the greatest films ever made, a psychedelic wonder the likes of which you have never seen before. At the end of the day, all that it really offers is weak social commentary on the inherent creepiness behind family theme parks, featuring the shenanigans of a Lester Burnham wannabe. The one saving grace in Escape from Tomorrow comes in the form of Abel Korzeniowski’s beautiful score.

I wanted to love this film. I really did. While there are some clever moments here, they never really add up to much. I wanted this film to take me to new heights, to restore my faith in the medium. It didn’t do any of those things. In fact, it’s all painfully, unforgivably ordinary.
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
If not for the "guerrilla filming", this movie would receive no attention from anyone 14 Oct. 2013
By Picturesque Music - Published on Amazon.com
When I first heard about this I thought it was an amazing idea. I still think that. Filming much of a movie without Disney's permission on site is very clever. I disagree that it's particularly courageous/difficult (most scenes are not terribly long and without the number of people filming at Disney I'm not at all surprised somebody could pull this off); it's just something most people don't think of doing.

This is of course what gained the film notoriety and indeed is the only thing really of note. The rest of the movie is a combination of strange/silly/weird. Some of the green screen scenes made no sense, nor was I convinced that they had to be done on green screen (and the use of it was obvious, even though monochrome is more forgiving of green screen, I have to imagine).

I am really struggling to give this 3 stars, but will if only because the score of the film is decent enough, plus the aforementioned idea. The movie itself did not hold the weight of its hype, however.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Surrealistic head-trip 22 April 2014
By Matthew Scott Baker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
After I sat down and watched this film, I decided to get online and read a few reviews. Interestingly, people are mostly very adamant about either loving it or hating it…I didn’t find too many reviews that were neutral. I can see why some might balk at the idea of this film; after all, it basically ‘attacks’ a wonderland that is dubbed ‘the happiest place on Earth’. But what many of the naysayers may not realize is that the movie is a parody, and it is not meant to be taken literally. This is even discussed in a ‘Making Of’ featurette in the Special Features. I personally loved the film, and I’m recommending everyone out there give it a shot, if anything to see what all of the discussion is about.

As an independent filmmaker myself, I have to tip my hat to director Randy Moore. He shot the film guerrilla-style inside of Disneyworld and Disneyland, and as a result, was able to achieve a monumental feat. If you are not familiar with the word, ‘guerrilla’ in terms of filmmaking basically means he didn't have permission to use the location or images he was filming. He and his team bought tickets to the parks and then quickly shot their scenes amidst all of the visitor chaos. The finished product is a remarkable testament to working hard to chase a dream.

ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW is shot surprisingly well, considering most of the footage was obtained using Canon DSLR cameras. I am impressed with the lack of shakiness in each scene, especially those filmed on the rides. This makes the movie so much more enjoyable and allows the audience a deeper immersion into the film.

The acting is very good as well. Roy Abramsohn and Elena Schuber do a great job as the bickering parents, but the kids really steal the show for me. Katelynn Rodriguez and Jack Dalton portray the couple’s two children, and they do an excellent job with their roles. Granted, they are not the focal point of the film, however they are involved in almost every key part and do a phenomenal job as such. I particularly commend Dalton, for this is his first movie role (if his IMDB page is correct).

But the dreamlike story is what wins me over with ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW. Describing this film as ‘trippy’ certainly does not do it justice, but that’s exactly what it is. There are moments in this film where you don’t know whether to hide your eyes or rewind what you just saw. Certain elements of the plot play off of urban legends related to Disney, while other pieces are simply just way out there. But regardless of where the bizarreness comes from, it definitely entertains.

ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW is a big win for me, and I suggest you give it a look. Be ready to either love it or hate it, though…and make sure you can back up your decision because it is a good bet you’ll be asked if the film ever comes up in discussion. It will be available next week.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
There's Always Tomorrow 12 May 2014
By Roochak - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
A dark fantasy/science fiction hybrid that takes an intriguing premise and goes nowhere with it, ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW isn't much of a movie, but it's a great example of how a guerilla filmmaker can buck the system through sheer force of will.

The story of a guy with a troubled marriage who takes his family to Walt Disney World and loses his mind there could've been hilarious and/or horrifying. In this case, it's neither -- the film aims for a rococo David Lynch surrealism and misses by a country mile. What is the protagonist, Jim White's, connection to Epcot Center? Who is that little girl with the wicked witch? What the hell is "cat flu?" Why do I get the feeling that every plot twist is being thrown at the viewer as if it had been thought up on the day it was filmed?

I like the cinematography, and the faux-Disney musical score. Question is, will Randy Moore's next movie be one I'll want to watch more than once?
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